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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've hunted in snake country all my life and so far have never been bitten. Always wanted some genuine snake boots, and something tall to keep my pant legs from getting wet in the early morning dew. After looking for a long time, and checking prices, I finally found some at Cabelas. They are Trekker brand, with nylon uppers. They are lace ups and waterproof. Pretty lightweight too! They feel good, and I think I'm gonna like them. They are on sale right now. Thought I might pass it along. Hope it's not against the rules. If so, I'll pull the thread.

John
 

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Hunted in Arizona in my Youth and then later in south west Texas bowhunting.

I always stayed away from the clumps or clusters of Bush and kept my eyes on the ground as I walked.

I have had some close calls in Arkansas back when my brothers and I hunted Gin Sang all summer when we were young. Copperheads were the Problem, not so much rattlers. A Woodsman that is involved with his presence in the Viro, usually can avoid the issues but **** hunting at night was a gamble in warm weather. I waited till the Copper grabbers were in the ground before I hunted at night. I have been bitten by a grabber in my youth while digging in an Oak pile of milled lumber in the hand and although he did not get me good,,my hand swelled and I could not eat for a couple of days.:luck:
 

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yeah, i hear you. on the reservation land i farm there are a lot of rattlers and they stretch out along side of the sprinkler pipe when it's hot. you have to kick every pipe as you walk up to it or you may grab more snake than pipe when you are changing them. i've been around them all my life and still hate, (fear), them. but that has kept me from being bitten.
 

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A word of advice: They're nice but don't get lulled into a false sense of security by a pair of snake boots. I grew up hunting the coastal plains of NC and then spent 35 years stomping Florida swamps. Never worried about snakes but learned to keep a watchful eye, if you're worried about snakes you'd best stay in the house. The only time I ever got hit was the day I put on my first pair of snake boots, luckily on the back of my calf in a protected area. I thought the snake boots made me safe. I stopped being as vigilant because of them. They didn't. They just made me safe from short snakes that didn't like to climb up into stuff....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
longrifle, I had to laugh at your post. No, I fear man nor beast. I do hate snakes though. I've hunted in areas all my life that had the biggest timber rattlers and cottonmouths that have ever crawled the face of the earth. Been lucky I guess, and hyper vigilant. I knew they were there, and avoided them. I like high top boots for several reasons. With regular boots, my pant legs would get wet and that would wick down into my socks giving me wet feet. Then snakes of course. Wading shallow creeks keep your feet dry. We have a particular weed in Oklahoma that if it gets into your pant cuff, it will work it's way up your leg inside your pants. It sticks and drives you nuts. With your pants tucked into the boots, that stops that too. Then of course ticks and chiggers. Pants tucked in and a healthy dose of DEET, and you are in business. So, as you can see, I like high top boots. I used to wear high top rubber boots, but they are heavy, make my feet sweat, are a booger to take off, and they are cold on my feet. The main reason for the post was that I found some good ones, and for $89.95 a pair. Much cheaper than any that I have found in the last year or so.

I really liked your last sentence about short snakes. That's funny. I'm still laughing.
I like your quote too about being in a fair fight. Been there a time or two.
 

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OK so what has the cucumber smell, is it the snake?
Depends on where you are Steve? If your near a salad bar,,you need Ranch!:p

Simply by being snakes, copperheads are often the subject of myths, tall tales and unsubstantiated claims of extraordinary behavior. One old tale suggests that a person can tell when a copperhead is nearby because they give off an odor that smells like cucumbers. Fact is, most snakes when handled or frightened release a fluid-like musk from their vent. This is done to discourage predators. This musk has an unpleasant odor and is certainly not a smell that you would want on your salad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Steve, if you smell it, you are too late. You a city boy? Come see me. I'll take you to the rattlesnake roundup coming soon in Oklahoma. You can pet a big one! Eat some fried too. Rattlesnake that is. I'll watch it all from the next town! LOL!

Last summer I drove past one near where my wife grew up, on a back country dirt road. That thing was over six feet long, and big around as my biceps, and I'm a pretty big old boy! I could have jumped out and killed it, but I didn't want the danged thing in my truck. As big as it was, it had enough venom in it to kill a big man. No way in hell was I gonna handle that thing. There was a nice set of snake skin recurve limbs on him though, plus enough for accessories!

Forgot to add, cottonmouths stink too. That's a short, fat, dark gray to black, snake that inhabits still waterways. When it opens it's mouth, the inside is white. Hence the name cottonmouth. Sure would like to take Steve and Matt Potter hunting with me. They could walk point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have many snake stories, but this is the funniest. I was fishing a local farm pond. Tackle box in one hand, and rod and reel in the other. Walking a brushy part of the pond dam, along a cattle trail beside the water. My wife was walking about 10 feet behind me. Well, a big water snake slithered across the top of my feet and into the water. I hollered snake and started running in place. Couldn't get the forward momentum going. She screamed and started putting a new zip code between her and that pond. Pretty funny after I got my heart restarted.
 

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John, not a city boy here, I grew up in the country on an acreage, and hunted-fished-trapped with Dad from the age of 4, just no rattlers TO SPEAK OF here.
They're in a few places around the state but to large degree not much.
Couple of times I thought I've heard them, picking berries in the briars....not sure.
I've never seen one in the wild except a couple at Little Sahara in your state.
I never heard of the cucumber smell connection.
 

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I grew up in western Kansas and you learn to always know where your putting your hands and feet. Have had a couple close calls but never been bitten :) my uncle had a dog that had been bitten so Many times he was immune to rattler venom. That beware of snake instinct saved me from copperhead bite when we camped at lake of ozarks in Missouri.
Larry

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Picking berries in the briars around here can be a bit dicey. I'm really more careful about where I put my hands rather than my feet. My close encounters have been with copperheads. They make no noise. Just get ya if you get too close. Gives me the shivers just thinking about it.
 

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when i was farming corn and using open ditch irrigation it was always fun when a neighbor driving by put up a sign on a fence post that he had seen a rattler going in the corn at that point. made you sort of walk careful when you chased water that morning and evening.
when i cut and bale hay i see them almost constantly on some parts of the hay fields. the swather kills a few and when i bale you can see the come to the top of the windrow and slip off the hay just before it raises to go into the baler.
i have only baled a few of them in all the years i've been farming. they can really move.
i have my dogs immunized against rattler venom. they get bit once or twice a year it seems. still have to treat for infection but they do not suffer protein loss at all.
 

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John Ryan, I lived in Ok for several yrs and the first time I went hunting around Ft. Gibson area I spent more time sidestepping,flipping snakes w/ my walking staff and pulling my dog back than actually hunting. The cottonmouths tend to keep me more weary than others, spent more time around water. The craziest experience I had is a couple of gents wanted me to go noodling and ain't no way I am sticking my arm down some submerge hole to grab a catfish w/ cottonmouths around. I was taught as kid to keep an eye out and smell for timber rattlers along the Upper Mississippi Rv bluffs and islands. My brother was like a snake magnet, if one was around he would find it. His ex-Nam bud stopped by and said the same thing w/ him in Nam, never seen anything like it and he never got bit. My last Navy duty station in Tn. I lived by a church that believed in snake handling and no I did not become a member either.
 
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