Trad Talk Forums banner
1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Victim of Geography
Joined
·
1,160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I used to shoot a lot of Hare around here with an 12ft/lb airgun.

These are Scrub Hare (Vlakhaas) and get to about 10lb, they are a lot tougher than rabbit and can be found in early morning or late afternoon i.e. low light. Very active at night and easy to shoot when lamping.

I have a couple of Judo points, Blunts and things called Adders. Which would be best?

I have some old Zwickey 165gr broadheads I found at the gun shop but I have not tuned an arrow to shoot such heavy heads. Think these would be overkill!

My plan was to take a Reedbuck this winter but I can't guarantee my first arrow in 6" unfortunately, not for lack of practice though. Thought the Hare would make up for my hunting quest.

Thanks all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,355 Posts
For a rabbit that big I might use a broadhead too but I'd still back it up with an Adder. Adders with field points do a number on our cottontails but they sure won't make 10 pounds. I've even had good luck with a small washer behind the field point....
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zulu

·
Spearhead
Joined
·
3,581 Posts
Zulu, rabbits ESP jack rabbits are tough and fast, can't imagine one 10#, once shot they run like the dickens and into the nastiest stuff.
So if you want your arrow back go with a junk broadhead. Very least the adder.
This has been my experience with them, not a 10# one tho. Wow.

Chad
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,891 Posts
There is something like a Judo head spring collar that mounts on a shaft behind the point (maybe thats the "adder" but not sure). I'd think a broad head plus something like that to keep the arrow from completely passing though would be a real practical combination to use

I wonder what getting a "Grand Slam" on all huntable species of rabbits/hares would entail?..

I checked that out on squirrels some years back. there are nearly a dozen species plus a few sub species here in the US as I recall and world wide a fair number more including some seriously giant ones in the jungles of southern India.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zulu

·
Victim of Geography
Joined
·
1,160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all.

Yeah, believe it or not that is how big they get(4.5kg). I have always shot them with head shots and almost always drop on the spot but with a bow I suppose it's a different story.

They are pretty good eating.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,004 Posts
Yep a cheap broadhead will do the trick. I picked up a bunch of MA-3 heads years ago and bob the front about 3/8 inch and sharpen them as I do other heads. The bobbed point keeps then from sticking in trees when shooting grouse. I've shot snowshoe hares with them with great success.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,516 Posts
Are these Belgian hares?? We had some that got introduced where I grew up they were the damnedest think to see. When you first jumped them you were never quite sure what they were - your brain sure wasn't thinking bunny


---------------------------------------------------

Team Montana - we are coming for your quarters ;-)
 

·
Victim of Geography
Joined
·
1,160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Matt, these are an indigenous species. Lots of the farmers dislike them.

Jer, yeah right, the old eye shot. My shooting's not quite there yet!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,452 Posts
I have shot a couple pickup truck loads of arrows at black tailed jack rabbits (hares) in the Texas Panhandle. They weigh four to six pounds.

In cold weather they hang tight in fall stubble fields. you can walk them up when the cold wind is out of the north. Give you running shots as they explode from under your feet. Great sport. Carry a lot of arrows :)



We used cheap broad heads.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,978 Posts
for jacks i always just use .38 cartridges on a 11/32 wood shaft, staked on with a small ended punch. you get the shock needed to stop them and the penetration to destroy the lungs etc..
we shoot them at night in our seed alfalfa fields where they mow acres at a time. sometimes have killed more than a hundred in a few hours.
that makes a cheap reusable arrow that does the job.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,452 Posts
Larry in Stinnett, TX there used to be a junk dealer that would give you 25 cent a piece for jack rabbits. He ground them up and froze them in blocks for mink food.

I had a small one wheeled trailer that we would load up with jack rabbits. It left a heck of a blood trail down the highway :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,978 Posts
rusty, we used to do that out here too! but since the animal teror groups started vandalizing mink farms a few years ago that outlet dried up.
i always pick up all the rabbits as we kill them and just pile and burn them.
they are too diseased to eat for the most part. handle with gloves and watch for ticks and fleas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,065 Posts
The European Hare in NZ is very much like the American Jack Rabbit.
Bigger,tougher and a lot smarter than your average rabbit.
In NZ they have a habit of sitting tight when a person walks by so if your casual about your approach you can often get shots at them inside 10 feet or so as they lay flat to the ground.
Their also very territorial so where you see one one day will often be the same place you see them the next day.
Put a Beagle on one and they will often run a huge circle and end up back where they started.
They tend to hang out in pairs so if you see one it payes to keep an eye open for it's off sider as well,because it won't be far away.
In NZ their classified as a game animal mainly due to the flavour of their meat which is more like venison than rabbit.
I give the rabbits I shoot to my dogs,but the few Hares I shoot end up on my own plate.

John.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,355 Posts
LOL, sounds like every cottontail or swamp rabbit I've ever hunted! I've got'em so thick here that after a few months my Jack Russell just said "screw it, too many to chase and I'm tired of barkin'....".
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top