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Victim of Geography
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I got hold of one of these from a local compound bloke. I am shooting off the shelf now but the rest that I had seemed more forgiving.

I see it is called a hunting rest. It looks like it could be pretty brutal on the feathers.

Should I trim that vertical piece off?

Thanks as always.
 

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Barefaced tightropewalker
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The vertical piece is a pseudo-plunger. Trim off if you're using a plunger.
 

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I think it's called a "hunting" rest as it's pretty durable as well as simple (no moving parts) to break…. not to mention it's cheeeeeeap.

I've found a number of others that are also relatively cheap and quite "bulletproof"..and require no trimming…. springy rest…. Check out Lancaster Archery.

All the best… Happy 4th!

Tom
 

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Victim of Geography
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
TradArcher, I have no plunger hole for a springy.

It cost the equivalent of $10 so don't know if that's real cheap or not.
 

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Civil but Disobedient
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You could also go with the actual Hoyt Super Rest. It is much lighter than the hunter version and keeps winning gold medals. It is not as rugged, but it is easy to apply a new one if it tears. Still, they last a long time. My wife still has the original Super Rest on her bow. The first picture is with a plunger. You cut off the flap of plastic that supports the arrow so that the plunger can do that job. The second picture is the fully intact Super Rest, ready to be used without a plunger.

http://www.lancasterarchery.com/hoyt-super-rest.html



 

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Victim of Geography
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'll just give this one a go. Don't have spare feathers that's why I was worried about it being harsh on them.

When I put an arrow on it, it seems to cradle it real tight, can't really see how it would slide out with the paradox without having big contact. But as gluetrap says if they are tuned they should be OK
 

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I shot both the Hunter and the Super rests for years and still have several of them I keep as give aways and for emergencies .
A local shop was selling all their older left hand Hoyt Supers last year, so I bought all of them for 50c each.
They don't damage feathers on well tuned rigs.
You can trim the fingers on both, or just shoot them as they come.
With the Hunter, keep an eye on the wear on the rest finger.
It's soft plastic and is constantly wearing as you shoot so your point on is constantly changing as your arrow sits lower and lower on the rest arm/finger.
You don't know it but do subconsciously adjust for it .
They end up with a deep groove worn into the finger and I've seen them almost worn through but the owners had never thought much about it.
An that is why I stopped using the Hunter.
In truth it probably never effected my shooting in the lest but just the knowledge that it was happening didn't work with my slightly obsessive approach to tuning.
I can't stand movement or stretch or anything that wears or comes loose without my express permission.

But yeah,their still a very good arrow rest. 8^}
John.
 

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I put one on my Rambo Warf. Maybe. I should have taken plunger off because it can be hard for me to seat the shaft in that curved, holder part. Works great for skinny shafts. I am letting my brother-in-law use the bow also. He had the same trouble. I seem to remember a (fix) for this but it has been many years memory going. I replaced it with a Brush rest that I drilled a hole in to accept the DAS shorty plunger.
 

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The "hunter" rest is designed for beginners, and hunters who sometimes have trouble keeping the arrow on the rest during the draw. Beginners, because that's just what beginners tend to do, and hunters because they sometimes shoot for awkward positions. The vertical lip is designed to cradle the arrow shaft to prevent this from happening.

The "vertical" portion can easily be trimmed off if you're concerned about it. Simply snip it off and round the edges with an emery board or a piece of extra fine sandpaper.

If your draw is decent, and you aren't torqueing the string or pinching the nock, you should have any problems with the arrow coming off the rest.
 

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Also, I failed to mention that if you feel your arrow is too wide to for the rest, this can easily be adjusted.

Simply heat the arm slightly with a hair drier and while it is warm, bend the rest arm back in the direction of the arrow. Let it cool in this position, or even run it under cold water if it isn't attached to your bow.

This will give you a couple more millimeters of room for your arrow shaft.
 

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For the mix, the Bear Weather rest is a rubbery material, rather than hard plastic, and the arm that the shaft lays upon is a gentle curve, or cradle, without that aggressive upwards tilt shown on the pictured Hoyt rest.

I prefer them because of this softer and more subtle engineering. As mentioned above, decent tune should find the shaft clearing an elevated rest as easily as it would a shelf and side plate.

Might not be one's cup of tea, but I thought I'd toss it onto the menu for consideration.
 
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