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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
How do you think the offset will effect this riser with ILF limbs attached? The centerline is correct from end to end but note the built in offset.
 

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Hi Sam,

I believe this design will induce a symmetrical twist in both limbs when drawn. As well, the riser will want to rotate in the hand.

My 2 cents,

Rasyad
 
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Hey Sam,

I think the pulleys move the string to center, inline with the grip while the cables have the string over toward the slide.

Rasyad
 

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Well, if it doesn't work, you'll have conducted an experiment that adds to the body of knowledge. And you got to scratch an itch ;-)
 

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Bear in mind that once the first couple developmental generations of compounds (when they were building off of x-recurve risers) passed, the whole compound archery was being marketed to "second season" hunters who had very little or no exposure to traditional archery techniques, designs and learned values. so there were some designs that flew in the face of old and proven designs. A lot of the science that has evolved with the advent of the material/technology changes in traditional archery simply did not exist; so there was a lot of seat-of-the-pants engineering going on.
The compound market to new-to-archery bowhunters practically exploded and the pool of old school experienced bow designers became thin on the ground (and many of the good ones shied away from compound design). The compound also fell under the control and pressure of marketing oriented management and an automotive style new-model-every-year mindset fueled changes for money's sake, whether the changes were well thought out and tested or not.
Until Darton's al/mag casting plant had a disastrous fire that basically put them out of business; they were a major player in riser mfg. {Among others they may have been a supplier to Bear/Grayling--but I'm not positive about that} They did a lot of innovative stuff but had a lot of short lived designs. In retrospect it seems like they let the market do their beta testing.
The whole point to this is that there are a LOT of, perhaps the majority of, compound handles (once you move out of the origin trad-bow riser derived ones) that just don't work well enough to be worth the time, effort, and expense; other than for the learning experience.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Bear in mind that once the first couple developmental generations of compounds (when they were building off of x-recurve risers) passed, the whole compound archery was being marketed to "second season" hunters who had very little or no exposure to traditional archery techniques, designs and learned values. so there were some designs that flew in the face of old and proven designs. A lot of the science that has evolved with the advent of the material/technology changes in traditional archery simply did not exist; so there was a lot of seat-of-the-pants engineering going on.
The compound market to new-to-archery bowhunters practically exploded and the pool of old school experienced bow designers became thin on the ground (and many of the good ones shied away from compound design). The compound also fell under the control and pressure of marketing oriented management and an automotive style new-model-every-year mindset fueled changes for money's sake, whether the changes were well thought out and tested or not.
Until Darton's al/mag casting plant had a disastrous fire that basically put them out of business; they were a major player in riser mfg. {Among others they may have been a supplier to Bear/Grayling--but I'm not positive about that} They did a lot of innovative stuff but had a lot of short lived designs. In retrospect it seems like they let the market do their beta testing.
The whole point to this is that there are a LOT of, perhaps the majority of, compound handles (once you move out of the origin trad-bow riser derived ones) that just don't work well enough to be worth the time, effort, and expense; other than for the learning experience.
And this is what it actually is and many know I will try about anything to recycle an old compound.:cheers:
 

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And this is what it actually is and many know I will try about anything to recycle an old compound.:cheers:
Sam, I have had several Proline and Dartons that the Cams were centered in the limbs, but the string was offset to the outside, no cutout in the riser. It was the cams and the steel cables that they designed around, not a old recurve riser. When the cams with to the split cable on the outside of the limbs, risers had cutaways.

Hope this works.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you Gents. Has been a learning curve for me to really look at centerline also. I did this for a guy and will only charge him shipping.
 
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