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Which one?

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Discussion Starter #1
I’m admittedly a BH hound and I accept that. I just got acquainted with my first recurve and have a few options at my disposal. I’m shooting a Bear SK roughly 47 lbs at 29”. Arrow weight is 600ish once I put the lighted nock on. 577 without. Shooting BE traditional 400 spine footed with a 1.5” 2216. Here are my options:

Simmons Swampshark 175 (on order)
GrizzlyStik XXL 200 (flies great for its size but is quite loud)
GrizzlyStik 125 Maasai: Hammer bir small cut

I have a tendency to hug the shoulder. How well would the Simmons and GrizzlyStik do on a leg bone hit if I let my human like tendencies get in the way of a perfect shot? Anyone have experience with those heads with bone impact and similar bow specs?
 

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No experience with those but I have had experience with ACE and Zwickey's and they seem to hold up pretty well but I only hug the shoulder during rifle season.
 

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I think Redfin has it, "No experience with those..." You've chosen BH's that aren't very popular. I've probably purchased more broadheads than anyone on this site or/and the next. (bought a 1000 three times in my life, plus 3, 6, and a doz here and there) I'm only vaguely familiar with the first and the last.

Here's a couple of generalizations. You don't say what kind of shoulder. I shoot one BH for whitetails and smaller, and another for bigger game. At 47 pounds it doesn't matter what your choice, you chances of going through shoulder are slim to none. Single bevel is better for the slim chance. Single bevel blades are not as strong as double. Long is better than shorter. A 3 to 1 ratio is a mechanical advantage, but there's not many BH's with that ratio. Non-vented are quieter than vented. If the Simmons has a concave blade, they're very hard to get sharp. Or at least harder than what you're used to.

All that said, I know of two animals killed with field points. They both were mistakes and second excited shots. One was a caribou and the other a whitetail. The caribou went about 125 yards maybe 150 and the whitetail about 100. If we're not talking about mechanicals, the difference between any COC BH would be measure in less than an inch. And if you have a pass through, only wider is better.

Bowmania
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the input. Pretty much answered my question. That’s the poundage I’m comfortable with so looks like I’ll be sticking with broadside/quartered away shots until I can handle a stouter setup. Thanks
 

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You might want to narrow down your tuning range before picking the broadhead. Maybe you have more luck than I do but I can't run anything from 125-200 on the same arrow and get the same tuning results. That lighted nock will also stiffen the shaft and potentially influence your options. If you've got all that narrowed down and your budget is high enough for the broadheads mentioned it won't make a spec of difference which one you pick for whitetails. All 3 are great heads, the simmons cut an absolutely incredible hole but are a bugger to sharpen. The other two I'm not a big fan of but they work. (I don't like the steel or heat treatment in either one. With your current setup and a 600grn arrow you will make two holes in every whitetail you shoot at under good conditions.
 

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Bob hit on something I forgot to mention. I never buy screw in tips. If you do, you bought a broadhead of say 200 grains and the only way you can change that weight is heating carbon to change the weight of the insert. I don't like heating carbon. I know guys say that they've never had a problem, but I know that they will before I do.

Really simple to change the weight of an adaptor. On my moose/elk heads I've added a Woody Weight which can add as much as 200 grains to the broadhead/adaptor. I've been shooting pretty light poundage for these animals and now have a new shoulder so things might change. And guess what? I can lower the weight of my broadheads.

Bowmania
 

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What I went with for my 40-45# recurve is Magnus Stingers, they might not be the best but they are good enough. I have never had a “hit the shoulder” problem in 45 years, the shoulder roasts my wife makes are outstanding, so I learned a long time ago to stay away from the shoulder.
As far as heating the carbon for insert changes, I’ve never heard of that. I have a 200grn field tip I heat up lightly to remove inserts.
I use 50grn aluminum inserts for both weight and arrow support.
 

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Bob hit on something I forgot to mention. I never buy screw in tips. If you do, you bought a broadhead of say 200 grains and the only way you can change that weight is heating carbon to change the weight of the insert. I don't like heating carbon. I know guys say that they've never had a problem, but I know that they will before I do.

Really simple to change the weight of an adaptor. On my moose/elk heads I've added a Woody Weight which can add as much as 200 grains to the broadhead/adaptor. I've been shooting pretty light poundage for these animals and now have a new shoulder so things might change. And guess what? I can lower the weight of my broadheads.

Bowmania
On carbons I use the blue "cool melt" glue stick. Melts at a lower temp than original "hot melt" glue stick and holds not quite as well, but I've never had an insert come out. To install, have a field point in the insert and just heat the insert enough to melt the "cool melt" glue. Stab it in! To remove just heat the point a little till you can slip the insert out. The carbon won't be more than warm to the touich of you watch what your doing.

Cool melt works for me. I never put flame to the carbon and have no problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I appreciate the comments of concern. But I’ve been using the kimshe hot melt on hundreds of arrow with zero issues. I can And do currently have 125, 175, and 200 in my quiver simultaneously with the use of brass. No big deal. When I do my part, they’re all hitting within a baseball of each other out to 30.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I think Redfin has it, "No experience with those..." You've chosen BH's that aren't very popular. I've probably purchased more broadheads than anyone on this site or/and the next. (bought a 1000 three times in my life, plus 3, 6, and a doz here and there) I'm only vaguely familiar with the first and the last.

Here's a couple of generalizations. You don't say what kind of shoulder. I shoot one BH for whitetails and smaller, and another for bigger game. At 47 pounds it doesn't matter what your choice, you chances of going through shoulder are slim to none. Single bevel is better for the slim chance. Single bevel blades are not as strong as double. Long is better than shorter. A 3 to 1 ratio is a mechanical advantage, but there's not many BH's with that ratio. Non-vented are quieter than vented. If the Simmons has a concave blade, they're very hard to get sharp. Or at least harder than what you're used to.

All that said, I know of two animals killed with field points. They both were mistakes and second excited shots. One was a caribou and the other a whitetail. The caribou went about 125 yards maybe 150 and the whitetail about 100. If we're not talking about mechanicals, the difference between any COC BH would be measure in less than an inch. And if you have a pass through, only wider is better.

Bowmania
I just received the Simmons head and yes they are a bugger to sharpen. I messed around with one with my kids running around and can tell I have some work to do. Popped a few hairs but not near where I’d want it to be.
 

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Lanski knife sharpener that has the ceramic rods that cross each other works great with the Simmons, or use Simmons broadhead sharpener works great also.
Take that burr off and be very careful they are that sharp.

Chad
 

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I appreciate the comments of concern. But I’ve been using the kimshe hot melt on hundreds of arrow with zero issues. I can And do currently have 125, 175, and 200 in my quiver simultaneously with the use of brass. No big deal. When I do my part, they’re all hitting within a baseball of each other out to 30.
Come on now! When I do MY part they're hitting within a ping pong ball out to 30. But, I rarely ever do my part for two shots in a row. There is that.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
My only point is that the weight in the end of the shaft can be achieved in different ways from my experience.

However, I’m going to eat some crow on this one because that Simmons head that I received just does not cooperate. I think I may have messed up by making my footer too long and inadvertently stiffening the shaft. It’s a 1/2” longer than my other footers and it didn’t cross my mind that even though I was adding weight up front with the slightly longer footer, I was actually stiffening it. Despite weighing the exact same as my other shafts, the Simmons tipped shaft I built up continuously hits high and left. And I am not crazy about it’s structural integrity after putting into the middle Tennessee dirt a couple of times. Tip curl and bending of the blade are something I want to minimize, but this thing isn’t built for that. Too long and thin out to the point. Back to the drawing board.
 

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My only point is that the weight in the end of the shaft can be achieved in different ways from my experience.

However, I’m going to eat some crow on this one because that Simmons head that I received just does not cooperate. I think I may have messed up by making my footer too long and inadvertently stiffening the shaft. It’s a 1/2” longer than my other footers and it didn’t cross my mind that even though I was adding weight up front with the slightly longer footer, I was actually stiffening it. Despite weighing the exact same as my other shafts, the Simmons tipped shaft I built up continuously hits high and left. And I am not crazy about it’s structural integrity after putting into the middle Tennessee dirt a couple of times. Tip curl and bending of the blade are something I want to minimize, but this thing isn’t built for that. Too long and thin out to the point. Back to the drawing board.
If durability is the highest priority for you I would take a look at the RMS gear cutthroat head. Its just about bomb proof and I personally find single bevels very easy to sharpen. They now make a 3 blade as well that I will have in the quiver this year. I've turned into a real broadhead ho lately.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I shot them out of my compounds a bit. Very tough head. I may go back to them after all. I just like trying new stuff and the thought of a little wider cut has me chasing something new.
 
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