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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, new user joining from SoCal. Saw TradTalk recommended as a place to learn about recurve shooting and the like so figure I would join up.

I'm an intermediate archer, did a JOAD program then shot mostly compound through high school and then didn't touch a bow for ~10 years. Getting back into it and I want to become proficient in recurve and traditional shooting; Asiatic bows seem very interesting but I think I'll stick to learning one thing at a time.

Interested to pick up my first ILF bow; a lot of info online and I'm zeroing in on what I want. Also have seen that I should pick up a copy of Shooting the Stickbow - plenty of learning to do. Thanks for having me! 馃憢
 

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lefty people are known to use more the artistic and creative part of their brain, we need them to put colors, feelings , and instinctive things in life , and archery of course.
welcome .
i was born right handed, but prefer to become a lefty after few weeks of life, it's so much better, it open my mind .
 

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Hi all, new user joining from SoCal. Saw TradTalk recommended as a place to learn about recurve shooting and the like so figure I would join up.

I'm an intermediate archer, did a JOAD program then shot mostly compound through high school and then didn't touch a bow for ~10 years. Getting back into it and I want to become proficient in recurve and traditional shooting; Asiatic bows seem very interesting but I think I'll stick to learning one thing at a time.

Interested to pick up my first ILF bow; a lot of info online and I'm zeroing in on what I want. Also have seen that I should pick up a copy of Shooting the Stickbow - plenty of learning to do. Thanks for having me! 馃憢
Welcome!

You can start with conscious aiming (assisted/system) or 'instinctive' (AKA split vision or instinctive gap, 'gapstinctive') just as well. My bias says the latter, but really I would suggest not even thinking about aiming yet, just work on getting good repeatable form.

In any case you can change aiming system later. Many are switching from stringwalking and conscious gap to 'instinctive', for the freedom and challenge of it - just look at a spot and put an arrow on it, without care to know the distance. Requires much practice, focus and self confidence, but is immensely rewarding. Others are going the other way around, wanting to be competitve at known distances and so take up the calculated and very accurate method of stringwalking, largely unbeatable at a tournament level. This method is used most in the 'barebow' division and gets results.
 

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I thought most Californians were Lefties already 馃. Does that make you Lefty虏. All jokes though 馃槀
Ha, you would be surprised how many normal down to earth hard working folks there are in CA. Not what you see on the news, its the fringe groups that get the headlines.
 
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Ha, you would be surprised how many normal down to earth hard working folks there are in CA. Not what you see on the news, its the fringe groups that get the headlines.
It's the same with most states. The majority of the wackos are concentrated in big cities. California seems like it has tons of outdoors opportunities but it's run by corrupt uneducated nutjobs so you have ridiculous regulations like banning predator hunting and having to buy tags for invasive species like pigs...
 

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Welcome to our band of merry men. Don't try to interpret that statement in a modern context.

The best advice I can give you or anyone can give you is get a coach.. You had coaches for every sport in high school, you need one for archery. If you want to lengthen the learning curve disregard the above.

Good form is easily repeatable form. You can get very good with consistent bad form, but it's going to take a long time. My advice is shorten the learning curve.

Bowmania
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you for the warm welcome folks,

You can start with conscious aiming (assisted/system) or 'instinctive' (AKA split vision or instinctive gap, 'gapstinctive') just as well.
Thanks for this Remote - I'm not familiar with string walking, but this made me think about what I want to do. So far I've been shooting compound with a sight, and recurve "instinctively". I find that when I shoot well instinctively, that is quite satisfying, so I will probably start with that, continuing to improve before trying other recurve aiming methods.

Is there a maximum distance/level of accuracy that is deemed achievable with instinctive aiming? I would be very surprised to nail tight groups at 50 yards etc..
 

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Thank you for the warm welcome folks,



Thanks for this Remote - I'm not familiar with string walking, but this made me think about what I want to do. So far I've been shooting compound with a sight, and recurve "instinctively". I find that when I shoot well instinctively, that is quite satisfying, so I will probably start with that, continuing to improve before trying other recurve aiming methods.

Is there a maximum distance/level of accuracy that is deemed achievable with instinctive aiming? I would be very surprised to nail tight groups at 50 yards etc..
Most "instinctive" shooters only shoot close range. The only barebow/trad shooters I have met that will shoot the long distances are Field and Outdoor target shooters. They all have aiming systems for the long shots. For NFAA field we shoot the adult stakes from 10 all the way to 80 yards. It is a mental workout getting through a course without marks or a written card. If your arrows are light enough and/or your anchor low enough for a 50 yard point on, you end up shooting the the 10 to 20 yard shot instinctive just because the gap becomes unmanageable. The 3d shooters I have met who claim to shoot instinctive become very inconsistent once the targets approach 20 yards.
 

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Hi all, new user joining from SoCal. Saw TradTalk recommended as a place to learn about recurve shooting and the like so figure I would join up.

I'm an intermediate archer, did a JOAD program then shot mostly compound through high school and then didn't touch a bow for ~10 years. Getting back into it and I want to become proficient in recurve and traditional shooting; Asiatic bows seem very interesting but I think I'll stick to learning one thing at a time.

Interested to pick up my first ILF bow; a lot of info online and I'm zeroing in on what I want. Also have seen that I should pick up a copy of Shooting the Stickbow - plenty of learning to do. Thanks for having me! 馃憢
...Welcome to a fellow lefty...
... Buying a copy of Shooting the Stickbow, is the best archery money you will ever spend!!!...
 
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Thank you for the warm welcome folks,



Thanks for this Remote - I'm not familiar with string walking, but this made me think about what I want to do. So far I've been shooting compound with a sight, and recurve "instinctively". I find that when I shoot well instinctively, that is quite satisfying, so I will probably start with that, continuing to improve before trying other recurve aiming methods.

Is there a maximum distance/level of accuracy that is deemed achievable with instinctive aiming? I would be very surprised to nail tight groups at 50 yards etc..
My pleasure. With much practice you can group well out to your point on. I personally find 10-15m challenging with light arrows (9-10GPP not so), but as the point becomes more present in my periphery, confidence at aim is more robust. Then it just comes down to the intricacies of good and repeatable form.

I personally conscious gap no better than I 'instinctive gap' to my point on. Past my point on I conscious gap. I'm settling into aim for 3 seconds on most shots, 5 or 6 at the longest. Instinctive need not imply 'snap shooting', as many think.

Once you feel your form is consistent, try an aiming excercise. Start with a blank bale, put a square of very bright tape on it. When you can group 6 arrows within 6" 3 times in a row, walk back 5m and do it again. Keep walking back 5m at a time, doing the same.

Have fun, get to know your bow. The most important thing is to enjoy yourself!
 

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As usual, Bowmania is right on.
Though there is a lot of good info on the internet it really helps to have someone who knows how to shoot set you straight鈥. and keep you from developing bad habits.
 
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Indri,

I am both a left-handed archer and a Southern Californian. Our area quite possibly has the strongest archery programs in the country, so you are in an archery mecca.

We need to start with what area you live in and where do you shoot. This will help align you with the resources available in your area including local archery clubs.

What JOAD program were you in and did you shoot in any of the State USA Archery tournaments?

Unlike much of the country, we have readily available certified coaches. In fact, the Olympic Training Center is in Chula Vista, so we get a lot of the National Team coaches here.

We also have the second largest archery shop in the country, and they know a lot about traditional, and Olympic archery. They are experts in ILF equipment.

The son of one of the owners was once top eight at the Olympic trials.

I am a member of two archery clubs at this time. One offers extensive instruction for free. The other is a five-star rated field archery club with two 28 target NFAA field ranges.

There are many other local clubs, including four other field archery clubs that are close enough for me to join.

There is also a lot of barebow and traditional archery experience in this area.

The second question is what your main archery focus is. Much of the focus on this forum is bowhunting, so a lot of the advice has a bowhunting bias.

There are a growing number of barebow target shooters on this forum, such as myself, but bowhunting seems to color a lot of the recommendations.

Once we know the answers to your location and archery focus, we can better target the information that will support your goals.

Otherwise, you will have to sift through this information and try to figure out what is relevant to you.

Keep in mind that too much information and/or unfocussed information can be worse than no information.
 

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Welcome! I think you'll find that there are Trad archers of all persuasions on this site, which keeps participation interesting and helpful. You're lucky to live in an area of the country with all of the archery resources that Hank mentions above - particularly if target archery is among your interests.
 

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Keep in mind that too much information and/or unfocussed information can be worse than no information.
i'm agree with that! to much informations can be dangerous
i heard somewhere i have to read more instead playing with myself..... (inyago)... so i did it, took a lot of informations, and i never shot so badly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
My pleasure. With much practice you can group well out to your point on. I personally find 10-15m challenging with light arrows (9-10GPP not so), but as the point becomes more present in my periphery, confidence at aim is more robust. Then it just comes down to the intricacies of good and repeatable form.
Thanks Remote - this is encouraging to me; at this moment I would prefer to become competent at "instinctive gapping" than conscious - as it just seems more fun. But - I do also have an interest in someday shooting recurve at longer ranges with a sight, trying to get the best groups/score... do you find it difficult to switch back and forth between barebow and Olympic modern-style equipment?

Indri,

I am both a left-handed archer and a Southern Californian. Our area quite possibly has the strongest archery programs in the country, so you are in an archery mecca.
Hi Hank, thanks for the great info. I will direct-message you about clubs.
Edit: I think I need to be registered for slightly longer to do this - will get back to you :)
 

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Thanks Remote - this is encouraging to me; at this moment I would prefer to become competent at "instinctive gapping" than conscious - as it just seems more fun. But - I do also have an interest in someday shooting recurve at longer ranges with a sight, trying to get the best groups/score... do you find it difficult to switch back and forth between barebow and Olympic modern-style equipment?
Oh I haven't used a sight in years in fact. It is fun to experiment with them and you should. Many find sights on a bow a serious upgrade and like the confidence they bring. They can surely augment your shooting out to very long known/measured distances.

As for barebow, I for one don't have trouble switching between aiming with a conscious system and 'instinctively'. Far prefer the latter, both the challenge and reward of it. Due to being awful at estimating distances across diverse terrains past about 20m, with any reasonable degree of proficiency, I'm a lot more accurate at unknown distances shooting instinctive. At known distances I can shoot either conscious gap or instinctive gap with equal accuracy out to my point on, at least on bows I know well.

However once you really know your bow, you 'know your gaps' intuitively anyway, and so units of measure, numbers, need not be part of your aiming. The arc of your arrow is your measure. Your bow arm raises to where it needs to go, to put your point precisely 'there' in your periphery relative to your target, as you only look at where you want the arrow to go. It comes quite naturally and with no thinking or calculation as such.

----

EDIT: Some inspiration as regards instinctive gapping and accuracy, that I've posted here way too often. A Welsh master and champion. He talks for a bit about focus, and then walks his talk:

 
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