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I want to start looking for a heavy riser, used, to try. I don't think I want a long riser. Maybe the 21 DAS, but no more than 21. What risers are heavier than most so that I can look out for one? Wonder what an average riser weights?
 

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Here's a link to some weights & specs:

http://www.perrisarchery.co.uk/bow_matrix.htm

Gives you a pretty good idea of what the mainstream is producing, but of course no Stolid Bull or others who may be pushing the envelope.

Regards,

Salskov
 

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Try a warf. I just bought a Hoyt Game Getter on here for 250.00 bucks. Came with Trad Tech carbon Max limbs. The riser is 21 inches and Im really surprised how well it shoots. I just got back in from shooting her in some preety good wind. The heavy riser really helps.Its also quite and shock free. Best deal going in the archery! Glad I did anyway.
 

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I prefer the Hoyt Rambo type of riser like Fatzboys has, but for heavy - and I might be wrong here - I think the Bear Black Bear might be a bit heavier.
Someone surely knows, for sure.
Prolines also seem heavier, to me, but I never weighed a riser to see.
 

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This is a riser that I'm shocked I don't see used more.

-Grant
The riser is a tack driver but not to aggressive. For a 20 yard indoor riser it is perfect. To get 34# limbs on the target face at 80 withna 28" draw maybe not the best. For 28" or less draw string walking at 3D ranges it is hard to beat.
 

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This 14" bolt down riser weighs two pounds. For an all out hunter riser it is just the right weight (IMO). It is a solid riser, no lightening holes or cut outs. Alloy 7075 density is 0.101# per cubic inch. That means there is 19.8 conic inches alloy in this riser.

this riser balances the limbs very well. Not sure exactly how the physics works. Has very little lean back after the shot if any

 

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Where is the grip in relation to the geometric center on that ACS riser?

-Grant
 

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Let me throw a twist into things...

Does the weight of the bow affect the shot or shooter as the poundage goes down or up?

In other words does weight only help or seem to help when the poundage is light enough and comfortable enough for the shooter to notice and vise-versa, does the weight of the bow become negligible as the poundage increases thus causing the shooter to strain to draw the bow?

I've noticed form and ability to comfortable draw a bow far outweighs the physical weight of a bow.

I've also noticed arrow weight significantly affects a shot as well. When shooting wood arrows for example, heavier ones seem to be more controllable than lighter ones (75 to 100 grains diff. in weight)

Ryan
 

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As my riser weight has increased, so has my ability to shoot well-tuned lighter spined arrows with the same weight limbs. This has combined to allow me to use lighter longer shafts, lighter point weights, creating faster arrow speeds and a smaller resultant vertical variations on mistakes in range estimation. All great benefits of increasing riser weight, in addition to greater resistance to bow arm movement.

Mark
 

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Ryan, good point. I have had to reduce some time ago. I forget there are shooters still drawing 50 - 60#.

I used to shoot 60# Groves metal risers as hunting bows. I had a 64" 61# with a 12oz home cast lead weight. Weight was shaped like a "U" with a bolt at the apex. The weighted riser help accuracy a great deal
 
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