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Have you read "Shooting the Stickbow" cover to cover?

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Civil but Disobedient
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I finally decided that I needed to understand the buzz, and occasional anti-buzz, surrounding Anthony Camera's "Shooting the Stickbow". I bought a copy. I am not yet in a position to provide an opinion on the book other than it is encyclopedic, and probably took a great effort to assemble. So far I have liked the parts that I have read. But here is my question. Has anyone out there actually read the book cover to cover, all 422 pages?
 

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I've heard that it covers a lot of the basics pretty well.
The public libraries are full of good reference books written back in the fifties and sixties that cover the basics.
Tony don't come around here no more...
 

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Has anyone out there actually read the book cover to cover, all 422 pages?
Yes all the chapters, but not in order. I generally pick it up browse through it and if something catches my eye, I will read that chapter.

Forgot to say for me, reading it is different to remembering it all and then putting it in practice, I have a memory like a goldfish. LOL

I enjoyed reading it.
 

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I've read most of it, a lot of the 'design' stuff was wasted on me. The part about having a good shooting sequence stuck and helped me the most.
 

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Cover to cover, no. But I have plenty of bookmarks on pages that I refer to often. Mostly about tuning. Very informative book
 

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Personally, I think Shooting the Stickbow is an excellent book for both the beginner and the more experienced archer. I have read it from cover to cover (honest) and I return to it again and again for reference. Some of the text is a little parochial (who decided the Golden age of Archery was the 60's and 70's???) and some of the text on instinctive shooting wouldn't stand up to robust neurological examination .... but other than that I think it's an excellent piece of work and a valuable addition to the archers bookshelf
 

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Mine is highlighted in spots that I need to keep going back to. What this book desperately needs is an index. I've been reading Tony's posts here and there for years and this book is a nice compilation of his advice.
 

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I have tried to read it cover to cover, but have honestly not been able to stick with long enough. I have flipped thru it page by page. I also find that it covers the basics pretty well. For tuning I use tuning for tens, for alignment and form I use Kisik Lee's book. However, where Shooting the Stickbow might be more on the basic end, I find Kisik's book too much on the techincal end. I would like to find something more in the middle a little more in depth than Shooting the Stickbow, but a little easier to follow than Kisik's book.
 

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I voted I use it for a reference but probably have read it all but not start to stop, in stages. I thinks it's a great reference book and I have a lot of pages bookmarked I refer to. I also used the chapter on string making to help me with that. Good book to have around.
 

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I think I have read it all now, just not in order. It's been a great help to me many times, as has Tony himself. He's a good guy and always happy to help if you ask.

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I voted "Have never read it"....but wished there was a voting option for...

"Refuse To Buy/Own It"

Cause that's where I'm at with it....and please let me explain why before flaming me for expressing my feelings as here is why I feel the way I do...and as per usual?...I may be very unique in my feelings about it...but here's why.

I loved shooting my first stick bow as a 7-8 year old child in the mid 60's....there were many days my green/white solid glass Fred Bear kids bow with rubber molded handle was my best friend all day long...with cedar target arrows that cost .25 cents each or 5 for a dollar (about a months allowance for me) at Two Guys dept. store in north jersey and went on to own one or two other real recurves (I can't recall but I'm certain they were Bears) prior to joining the U.S.M.C.

Post Marine Corps?...my uncles my age were telling me about these new fangled bows with wheels...I had to try one and bought a Bear White-Tail hunter and loved it...then gave that to one of my uncles and bought a Kodiak Special Compound...then we took the NJ Bow Hunters Education course and the real journey began.

Several years later I moved back home to Florida and missing friends to shoot with?...I sought out the local archery club...which blew my mind...NFAA Sanctioned Treasure Coast Archers...and it was there that I first ran into archers who truly lived it and knew their craft very well and were extremely willing to help, coach and share their knowledge free of charge and only to happy to do so...Wonderful Folks!....Great People!...The BEST Days of my Life as they were the ones that took me to state level shooting stardom! :)

10 years later?...in the mid 90's?...The city fathers and their merry band of evil commissioners shut down our club/range by refusing to renew our lease citing liability issues because our club bordered their precious golf course where more often then not we were dodging and finding golf balls while not so much as one of our archers ever put an errant arrow on their holier than Sunday fairways...and that started the great depression and ended the fun for many.

I resorted to shooting in my backyard and then gave up all together for a decade and a half...and then returned several years ago...joining an old club 60 miles north of me...meeting some old smiling friends again (most of whom I can assure you have no clue that such a book exists) and in finding these forums?...discovered that someone took all that valuable knowledge (and first hand experience inter-acting with fellow archers) I learned from MANY others years ago, free of charge and happily relayed and put it into a self-published paperback to profit from as archers stayed home reading it...and maybe I'm being quite crass about it but for some reason?...it offended me to my core and went directly against everything I thought I knew about the journey and brotherhood of archery as I learned and knew it.

Furthermore?...I can't think of a single dilemma or problem any archer new or old could possibly have that couldn't and wouldn't be readily answered by the many knowledgeable archers who frequent forums such as this...and like in the spirit of the days of old?...free of charge and only to happy to be of assistance. :)

Can I see where such a book would help fast-track a new archer?...yep...do I agree with it?...nope....and why?...because the enriched overall experience of the journey involves so much more than sitting home with a computer in the bedroom, a paperback in the living room and a bag target in the backyard...and if there were ever a time that archery needed the real, live in person support of all archers?...we're living in it.

As archery is so much more than one guy selling a book.

Now maybe my view is skewed...as it often times is but...

yep...I guess that sums up why I feel the way I do.

Thanks for reading...I feel better now and L8R, Bill.
 

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Yep, read it cover to cover.

There is some good accurate information in it. That information is taken from other sources, which are not credited.

There is a lot of misinformation and simple repetition of myths. The author is generally quite happy to take credit for that content himself.

What can you say? The author himself, in the book, lists his credentials as:

1) Played Robin Hood on a soap opera.

2) Dresses up and attends Renaissance Faires

3) Coaches Cub scouts

That's it. There ya go.

As Seven Arrows mentioned, he don't come 'round here much anymore.
 

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Yep, read it cover to cover.

There is some good accurate information in it. That information is taken from other sources, which are not credited.

There is a lot of misinformation and simple repetition of myths. The author is generally quite happy to take credit for that content himself.

What can you say? The author himself, in the book, lists his credentials as:

1) Played Robin Hood on a soap opera.

2) Dresses up and attends Renaissance Faires

3) Coaches Cub scouts

That's it. There ya go.

As Seven Arrows mentioned, he don't come 'round here much anymore.
RED! :lol:

But I have to admit...there is one thing he often times put into print that I can whole heartedly agree with...

"Viper Out"

:lol:
 

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I think Anthony Camera takes more of a hit for his book than he deserves. I have heard so much praise, and yet, so much criticism, that I decided that I had to read it for myself. I could not honestly recommend it to anyone sight unseen. To appreciate it, you have to understand the process of assembling a comprehensive book like this. Researching other books and sources is a common and accepted practice when assembling a book of this type -- meaning non original ideas. That is the way most college text books are written. At the basic 101 level, they are not referencing sources. It would be difficult to do so since each source pulled from some other source. The beginning of the chain is long since lost and mostly irrelevant to the goal of the book. The point is, he put in the effort and captured the information in one place, so folks that do not have a mentor, have a place to go. Also, it is important to have a reference to go back to, when you need help to remember what you have learned. That is why we have college professors, but still have college text books. I use Kisik Lee's Total Archery to clarify things that my coach is trying to teach me. Some ideas take time to gel, and sometimes you need the information stated another way in order to fully grasp the concept. You do not get rich writing books like this. Believe me, if you add up your hours, you can make a better wage working fast food. Like I have said, I am not sure, yet, whether I would recommend the book to others. I will need to read more before I can determine that. I do, however, applaud the effort.
 

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I voted "Have never read it"....but wished there was a voting option for...

"Refuse To Buy/Own It"

Cause that's where I'm at with it....and please let me explain why before flaming me for expressing my feelings as here is why I feel the way I do...and as per usual?...I may be very unique in my feelings about it...but here's why.

I loved shooting my first stick bow as a 7-8 year old child in the mid 60's....there were many days my green/white solid glass Fred Bear kids bow with rubber molded handle was my best friend all day long...with cedar target arrows that cost .25 cents each or 5 for a dollar (about a months allowance for me) at Two Guys dept. store in north jersey and went on to own one or two other real recurves (I can't recall but I'm certain they were Bears) prior to joining the U.S.M.C.

Post Marine Corps?...my uncles my age were telling me about these new fangled bows with wheels...I had to try one and bought a Bear White-Tail hunter and loved it...then gave that to one of my uncles and bought a Kodiak Special Compound...then we took the NJ Bow Hunters Education course and the real journey began.

Several years later I moved back home to Florida and missing friends to shoot with?...I sought out the local archery club...which blew my mind...NFAA Sanctioned Treasure Coast Archers...and it was there that I first ran into archers who truly lived it and knew their craft very well and were extremely willing to help, coach and share their knowledge free of charge and only to happy to do so...Wonderful Folks!....Great People!...The BEST Days of my Life as they were the ones that took me to state level shooting stardom! :)

10 years later?...in the mid 90's?...The city fathers and their merry band of evil commissioners shut down our club/range by refusing to renew our lease citing liability issues because our club bordered their precious golf course where more often then not we were dodging and finding golf balls while not so much as one of our archers ever put an errant arrow on their holier than Sunday fairways...and that started the great depression and ended the fun for many.

I resorted to shooting in my backyard and then gave up all together for a decade and a half...and then returned several years ago...joining an old club 60 miles north of me...meeting some old smiling friends again (most of whom I can assure you have no clue that such a book exists) and in finding these forums?...discovered that someone took all that valuable knowledge (and first hand experience inter-acting with fellow archers) I learned from MANY others years ago, free of charge and happily relayed and put it into a self-published paperback to profit from as archers stayed home reading it...and maybe I'm being quite crass about it but for some reason?...it offended me to my core and went directly against everything I thought I knew about the journey and brotherhood of archery as I learned and knew it.

Furthermore?...I can't think of a single dilemma or problem any archer new or old could possibly have that couldn't and wouldn't be readily answered by the many knowledgeable archers who frequent forums such as this...and like in the spirit of the days of old?...free of charge and only to happy to be of assistance. :)

Can I see where such a book would help fast-track a new archer?...yep...do I agree with it?...nope....and why?...because the enriched overall experience of the journey involves so much more than sitting home with a computer in the bedroom, a paperback in the living room and a bag target in the backyard...and if there were ever a time that archery needed the real, live in person support of all archers?...we're living in it.

As archery is so much more than one guy selling a book.

Now maybe my view is skewed...as it often times is but...

yep...I guess that sums up why I feel the way I do.

Thanks for reading...I feel better now and L8R, Bill.
Thoughtful reply from a man that's contributed so much to the sport. Those that can, teach, those that can't become keyboard heroes.
Perhaps one day your educational videos and thoughtful insights will help as many archers as that book, but somehow I doubt it.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Thoughtful reply from a man that's contributed so much to the sport. Those that can, teach, those that can't become keyboard heroes.
Perhaps one day your educational videos and thoughtful insights will help as many archers as that book, but somehow I doubt it.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
And ya know what?...I'm okay with that John...as you are certainly just as entitled to express your honest opinions as I am...and like some may agree with me others will most certainly tend to agree with you...and again?...I'm okay with that.

For me?....the important part is that I'm okay with me...and I am...as I smile knowing and remembering the many Boy Scout troops where I showed up early on Saturday mornings at the range to drag all the TD glass recurves out of our storage shed...sort and inspect their practice arrows...make sure the front range was freshly mowed and paste and mount targets to assist them in acquiring their archery merit badges.

Nor the many merry moments we had at our monthly club officers meetings over a decade where I acted and served as range officer...then sec./treasurer...and finally VP...nor will I forget the sweet taste of freshly harvested, lightly breaded and deep fried bite sized chunks of moose back strap I and many other club officers were treated to one evening at a monthly officers meeting by Dillard "Buck" Bucklin and his wife from a moose he took while on a guided hunt with his best friend Fred Bear.

Nor will I forget this young man I saw 10 years my junior who showed up from Indiana with some extremely whacked out gear but rock solid form as I took him under my wing (in a "passing the torch" sort of way) and coached him to becoming Florida's BHFSL State Champion for several years running...and his parents were so grateful they flew down to visit him and went out of their way to take my family and I out to steak dinner...the following year?...they invited me to fly up with their son "Steve White" to hunt their family farm in Indiana...which I happily took them up on.

You know...archery things you can't get out of a book. ;)
 

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I have yet to purchase the book, but likely will in the near future. One thing I have noticed in my years of flinging arrows is that I often find something helpful to me just about everywhere if I keep an open mind.

And Jinks, I understand your point about folks helping others in their journey for free, but I do not expect a stranger to use his/her precious time, energy, and knowledge helping me without some type of compensation. Using your train of thought here, folks like Rick Welch and Rod Jenkins should offer shooting clinics for free. Folks like Rick Barbee and LBR(I can`t remember Chads last name at the moment) should make strings for the cost of material, and Norm Johnson should make me a Snakebit bow for 100 bucks to cover the cost of lumber and glue. My financial consultant doesn`t help me for free, and that SOB brings me less pleasure most of the time than watching the MBB series.;)
 
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And Jinks, I understand your point about folks helping others in their journey for free, but I do not expect a stranger to use his/her precious time, energy, and knowledge helping me without some type of compensation. Using your train of thought here, folks like Rick Welch and Rod Jenkins should offer shooting clinics for free. Folks like Rick Barbee and LBR(I can`t remember Chads last name at the moment) should make strings for the cost of material, and Norm Johnson should make me a Snakebit bow for 100 bucks to cover the cost of lumber and glue. My financial consultant doesn`t help me for free, and that SOB brings me less pleasure most of the time than watching the MBB series.;)
And Mitch?...I agree...you have some very valid points...but in keeping with your train of thought?...we could even add the likes of Fred Bear, Ben Pearson and Howard Hill to your list...and the men you listed?...for some reason?...in my book are very close to those I just mentioned...as there's a passion about them that wreaks of a level of authenticity that I just don't sense from Mr. Camera's or his book offerings...as while the aforementioned seem to be extremely focused on promoting archery?...I sense Mr. Camera is more intent on promoting himself and his books....maybe that's just me?...but it is my honest personal opinion and I'm perfectly willing to be wholly and honestly truthful about that...in an "To Thy Own Self Be True" sort of way.

And I have to agree with you about the MBB series....as most of it?...brings to the front of my attention just how much dedication and discipline is required of the archer in this particular venue to get good at it...so yeah...but I'm glad I watched every volume of it!...at least I know what I'm dealing with! :lol:

BTW...thanks for understanding my point...and seeing it for what it is an not making more nor less of it that it is...JMHO.

Thanks again and L8R, Bill.
 
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