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Guys I always gapped at the target but have been reading about gapping at the bow/ arrow lately. When I gap at the target I always aim in inches below the target for example my gap at 15 yds is 18 inches below what I want to hit. This gap gets smaller as I go in or out tot he target and to my point on distance respectively. In reading some guys are gapping at the arrow ie in fractions of an inch 30 inches from your face and not on the target. It seems to be the same thing but I think it's a lot easier to visualize 1 inch at arms length than 18 at 15 yards.
I saw a thread abut this here that was very interesting

http://tradtalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=46790

I didn't reply with this detail there as its old and long enough that it may net get read but I wanted to expand on this.

Do you have to focus on the arrow tip to make this effective can you still look at the target and still perceive fractions of an inch well? For those that do shoot like this what do you do what works better? Seems easy and while it's likely the same gap just the cone of vision is a lot smaller at arms length than at 20 yards it would seem to be able to see the same gap more easily and consistently in close especially with different backgrounds etc.

What are your guys thought how do you do this and we're do you prefer to focus to get the best results?
Thanks as always
Don
 

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I have gapped both at the target and at the tip of the arrow.

Try this. Take a clear piece of plastic in a square or rectangular shape, punch a hole in it. Now remove your field tip from your arrow, slip the plastic onto the field tip and screw it back into the arrow. Position the plastic so its vertical and take a sharpie and draw lines on it at 1/4" above the field tip, 1/2", 3/4", 1", etc. You are basically making a site at the tip of the arrow. Now nock the arrow, draw back and look down the arrow, look through the plastic, and place those lines on the bullseye (dont shoot the arrow). This is how you visualize gapping at the arrow. You are basically taking a 3 dimensional site picture and making it 2 dimensional, as if the target was actually at the tip of the arrow. When I did this it helped me alot. Hope it helps you.
 

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That's a pretty good tip UDS, never thought about trying it that way. I never could grasp shooting at a deer's knees to hit the kill zone or trying to figure out where 18" is at 30 yards. I found though that I can easily see an inch or an inch and a quarter between the arrow and the target so gapping at the bow seemed like best alternative. I do see the tip of the arrow in my peripheral vision and use it somewhat for windage but it's blurred and my main focus is on the target. I took a tip from a thread here by Bob Gordon and started setting a temporary sight, a toothpick taped to the front of my bow. Once I sighted it in I measured the gap but left it in place and used it for a week or so. Seemed to make ingraining the gap a whole lot easier as well as seeing exactly how each distance affects the gap....
 

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Practice.

Stand in front of the target at 10 yards and shoot the gap until it's almost instinctive. Then move back to 15, 20, etc.... Initially, your primary focus will be on the arrow tip. Eventually, you will just recognize the arrow in your secondary vision and the gaps will be second nature. Don't switch bows and arrows at first. Learn it with one set up, different bows and arrows will change the gaps.

If you aren't shooting 3 under make the switch. It puts the arrow under your eye, all the best shooters are shooting 3U.

If possible, raise your anchor, the closer you get the nock of the arrow to your eye, the smaller the gaps, especially for short range games like 3D.

A longer and/ or heavier arrow will give you smaller gaps, but you will compromise speed. It's a give and take. Personally, I try to hit in the middle, average speed, heavier arrow.

Focus predominantly on developing a strong shot sequence. Aiming is a very small part of the process. Making a strong shot on every shot will make you more accurate in the long run.

I am not a champion shooter, but I've learned this from champions, and am following all of the same advice myself.
 

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I was just out back playing with gapping at the arrow. All I can say is wow!! what an easy way to gap. I am not sure if I was doing this correctly but I was using about the front third of the shaft. Between 15yds and 40yds my gap never was more than 2 arrow shafts apart with a point on of 30yds. Who ever started this post a BIG thanks this is a major piece of the puzzle. I am I guess using the shaft to gap with and not the point but I really like it.
 

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Practice.

Stand in front of the target at 10 yards and shoot the gap until it's almost instinctive. Then move back to 15, 20, etc.... Initially, your primary focus will be on the arrow tip. Eventually, you will just recognize the arrow in your secondary vision and the gaps will be second nature. Don't switch bows and arrows at first. Learn it with one set up, different bows and arrows will change the gaps.

If you aren't shooting 3 under make the switch. It puts the arrow under your eye, all the best shooters are shooting 3U.

If possible, raise your anchor, the closer you get the nock of the arrow to your eye, the smaller the gaps, especially for short range games like 3D.

A longer and/ or heavier arrow will give you smaller gaps, but you will compromise speed. It's a give and take. Personally, I try to hit in the middle, average speed, heavier arrow.

Focus predominantly on developing a strong shot sequence. Aiming is a very small part of the process. Making a strong shot on every shot will make you more accurate in the long run.

I am not a champion shooter, but I've learned this from champions, and am following all of the same advice myself.
Now do it like I do it. Don't think yardage or gap, just look where you want to hit. In your peripheral vision you will see your subconcious mind move your arm and set the gap. Once the bow settles(don't fight it or second guess the gap), and everything feels right, then commit and run the shot.
 

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Wow, that's complicated!!! The way I gap, you don't have to know the yardage - very simple. Plus you only need to know ONE gap.

I start with looking at the spot I want to hit and seeing the arrow below in my peripheral vision.
Practice at one distance until you can group thinking in your mind 'that looks about right' and shoot. Once you can group at that distance every other distance is an estimation from the original gap. Smaller gap for longer shots and larger for shorter shots. Eventually it becomes automatic. A great advantage when you're hunting.

I would never admit to being instinctive, but that's what it becomes - you end up knowing the gap so well.

Bowmania
 

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Thanks for the picture Sam, that is very close to how I see it. I have to correct my earlier post with regards to how much of the shaft I am using. After looking at it again I would say I am using about the last 3 inches for the gap. I have a 30yd point on but at 22yds I am closer to just 1 shaft below. I guess it could be a lot of factors that cause that but in either case it is a lot less then the 22in gap I was shooting.
 

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If you give every gap a name like 1/4" or 3/8" or what ever it is your brain will remember this. It's like naming your dogs as soon as you see them there is no mistake this is why Ben Rogers told me to give every distance a name.
 

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I have only played with this for the first time last night for about an hour so I know I have some fine tuning to do. That is what I liked about it most. I could give an arrow shaft number to each yardage as opposed to a feels right gap and my groups were tighter at most yardages after just an hour. It is much easier on my brain so it lets me focus on making a strong shot and not fighting the site picture.
 

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I go with focus on the target. Helps my concentration. I would really like to shoot wood arrows but the trajectory difference is a lot compared to my Aftermaths weighing 100 grains less than the cedars. I went to a high anchor point so in order to shoot the cedars I have to hold way over. Now that anchor just feels natural so I stay with it.
Try different styles and go with the one that works best for you.
You never know until you try.
 

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I am new at this gapping method so I may not be doing it right. If not please let me know before I start pounding the bale. I look at the yardage and give it a shaft value. I then draw to anchor set the shat reference sight picture then my focus returns to the spot I want to hit and I can then take my shot to its conclusion. That feels right to me but let me know if I should change anything.
 

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I have gapped both at the target and at the tip of the arrow.

Try this. Take a clear piece of plastic in a square or rectangular shape, punch a hole in it. Now remove your field tip from your arrow, slip the plastic onto the field tip and screw it back into the arrow. Position the plastic so its vertical and take a sharpie and draw lines on it at 1/4" above the field tip, 1/2", 3/4", 1", etc. You are basically making a site at the tip of the arrow. Now nock the arrow, draw back and look down the arrow, look through the plastic, and place those lines on the bullseye (dont shoot the arrow). This is how you visualize gapping at the arrow. You are basically taking a 3 dimensional site picture and making it 2 dimensional, as if the target was actually at the tip of the arrow. When I did this it helped me alot. Hope it helps you.
Going to give this a try. I am an instinctive shooter but am just starting to shoot at the 40-60m range and notice that I am looking for a gap, maybe because it is much bigger and more noticable at 40m than it is at 20. I am definitely gapping at the target rather than the arrow though. Will need to palm hammer my forehead to switch this perspective I think :).
 

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Going to give this a try. I am an instinctive shooter but am just starting to shoot at the 40-60m range and notice that I am looking for a gap, maybe because it is much bigger and more noticable at 40m than it is at 20. I am definitely gapping at the target rather than the arrow though. Will need to palm hammer my forehead to switch this perspective I think :).
Rob what is your point on distance? Your gap will be the largest at the halfway point(approximately). For me my point on is about 35yds, so 40-60m I would be gapping off the shelf or hail marry. :lol:
 

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Rob what is your point on distance? Your gap will be the largest at the halfway point(approximately). For me my point on is about 35yds, so 40-60m I would be gapping off the shelf or hail marry. :lol:
Since I don't consciously gap, I have no idea where my point on is. Also, as I said, I mostly shoot at about 20m. But shooting out beyond 30 m, I noticed that I have to aim at a bit of sky :). Will pay attention next time I am on the long range and let you know.
 
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