Trad Talk Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The better my form gets the more tired my body gets. The latest is my neck. I'm a right handed shooter and the left side of my neck gets stiff if I shoot for a long time. My thought is that I'm tilting my head to much and that is causing a stress. Do you guys have any ideas?
Thx
Mike
 

·
Civil but Disobedient
Joined
·
10,516 Posts
My upper back screams after a big shooting day. My arms are fine. That is why I know I am doing something right. Shooting with good form generally means holding longer, which translates into a greater energy expenditure. There isn't much that is easier on the body than snap shooting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,173 Posts
May not be a neck/shooting problem. Could be a spine problem. I'm working on that one from years of shooting heavy poundage.

Bowmania
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,355 Posts
My anchor determines where my pain comes from. My first year's pains were rhomboid. After a year of shooting with a low anchor I switched to a high one....and the pain moved with it. I should have bought stock in AsperCreme!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
I will toss in a "rogue" comment in the event that it may apply.

I preface this by assuming that you are properly bowed and that draw weight is not part of the equation.

Certain physiques may not be able to perform specific versions of "better form" with comfort and efficiency. Perhaps the natural flexibility of one's body, whether from birth or due to age, is such that a particular form ideal creates a "perceived hyper-extension" within the physique, so to speak (and for wont of a better term).

This type of perceived hyper-extension, while perhaps textbook in theory, may stress the physique to the point of discomfort and pain, though to the eye appears natural and proper.

I'll take the bow arm as an example. Literal hyper-extension would be taking a straight arm and forcing it to bend further backwards at the elbow joint away from straight, causing discomfort (and horrific arm slap!). However, during an archery shot, the naturally straight elbow joint may be perceived by a certain physique as "hyper-extended" to the archer's natural sensations of comfort and pain, and a slightly bent arm becomes the "normal extension" for their archery purposes.

Getting something "too right" may cross a personal threshold into a negative wrong.

Temporary physical discomfort, such as the minor "aches and pains" that always dissipate within few days, is part and parcel of new muscular employment.

Vivid and genuine discomfort and pain that are ongoing, and seem ever-present within the endeavor, indicate to me that something is amiss and requires remedial adjustment to eliminate the negative stresses upon the body.

There are several "textbook" archery elements that I cannot perform in textbook fashion simply because my innate flexibility hopelessly resists them. My natural posture is a bent wreck to start with, and certainly that affects how I perform archery technique in comparison to another archer whose own natural posture is "textbook" ... even before picking up a bow

(I should have listened to my momma when she used to chronically harp, "You need to hold your shoulders up ... you look like a blankety-blank turkey buzzard!" I ain't exaggerating, and I've lived to regret it - and let me assure you right now that her "blankety-blank" was one vicious whopper of a blankety-blank!)

Just some of my thoughts for perusal in the event that too much of a good thing may be presenting a bad thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,462 Posts
Watch out for anterior head carriage. Don't let your head jut forward and keep the shoulders down, Work a quick check of your posture into your shot sequence.

Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,903 Posts
Do you warm up before start of shooting?

Bow shooting, it's not a normal head position (specially with a closed stance) if you have no previous injuries you could do some neck stretches/exercises everyday between shooting, turn the head both ways and up/down, just enough to feel some pressure (don't over do it) over a number of weeks you should limber up those neck muscles.

Form can also cause issues, one obvious problem is raising bow shoulder during the draw, it will cause neck discomfort and injury, as suggested a video is a good idea, poundage may be too much for you at this stage, you may just be shooting too long sessions, it's always good listen to your body, if it hurts STOP shooting and give it enough time to heal.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top