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Haybale Hunter
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Ive heard alot of varying opinions about follow-thru, some people feel it is an integral part of the shot process, others have expressed the opinion that it is irrelevant [ that once you release the arrow it doesnt matter what you do with your hands ].

I'm sort of undecided. I do feel that when I focus more on good follow-thru my accuracy is a little more consistent. What say you? Is follow-thru an important part of your shot process or not something you bother thinking about too much?
 

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Ive heard alot of varying opinions about follow-thru, some people feel it is an integral part of the shot process, others have expressed the opinion that it is irrelevant [ that once you release the arrow it doesnt matter what you do with your hands ].

I'm sort of undecided. I do feel that when I focus more on good follow-thru my accuracy is a little more consistent. What say you? Is follow-thru an important part of your shot process or not something you bother thinking about too much?
In terms of the string hand and forearm during the release, I don’t think the follow through itself is the issue, but rather what your hand and arm end up doing wrong before the release and or anticipating the release if you are not focused on ensuring they move straight back after the release.

In terms of the bow arm there are a couple things going on. With a traditional bow launching arrows at 150-160 fps, an arrow going from 0 to 150 fps will still be on the bow for roughly 1/30th of a second. That’s long enough to cause issues if your bow arm is dropping during the shot or pulling to the outside after the release. It doesn’t take much movement at the bow to create a fair amount of change at the target.

There’s also the same follow through issue for the bow arm as there is with the string hand. If you start anticipating the shot and are not focused on keeping the bow arm pointed at the target, you are far more likely to drop or pull the bow off to the side before the actual shot or during the shot. If instead you are focused on keeping it pointed at the target, if you jump ahead a step anticipating the shot, you’re not doing anything different with your arm or hand.

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Ideally, over time good form and follow through become ingrained in muscle memory and you just do it without conscious thought. That’s why it’s important to focus on good form early on, and stop when you get tired and your form starts to fall apart. It’s also where a lighter bow on the 25-30 pound range can be an asset when working on form as you can get more repetitions before fatigue starts to become a factor.
 

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I think for accuracy, it's more important to be able to stare down your intended target while at full draw and actively aiming at it, and pushing with your bow arm toward the intended target. If I get lazy with bow hand toward target or not letting my mind settle during the aim, I'm spraying arrows. Let the shot happen and let the follow through happen on it's own, and the follow through you get will inform you on your "form"
 

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once it is "really" gone, you can do backflips, doesn't matter. but it's not gone just because you released the string. staying steady/good follow-thru, whatever you want to call it, does make a difference. is it overdone? sure. i've seen target shooters not move for several seconds after release. but that does not make them miss either. merely an unnecessary continuation of a pretty good habit to have. jmho
 

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It helps me be more consistent with my release. If I am not "reaching " for my ear lobe after the shot, my release hand might go out, down, wherever. Problem is "where ever" is not consistent and if the hand starts the wherever journey before string is completely released, it often ends in an outward pluck for me.

If I am reaching or following through to the same spot, it is a lot more consistent.
 

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When you hunt rabbits, are you watching to see if the arrow hits the rabbit? That's follow through - it's mental action first, and it is taught as mechanical action aka "do nothing" consciously until the arrow hits the target after release. That's proper "follow through" - your body reaction at your mental peak while shooting the bow. As long as you don't will yourself in the movement of your limbs after release aka you don't lose the interest / attention in where the arrow goes, you are good.
 

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It helps me be more consistent with my release. If I am not "reaching " for my ear lobe after the shot, my release hand might go out, down, wherever. Problem is "where ever" is not consistent and if the hand starts the wherever journey before string is completely released, it often ends in an outward pluck for me.

If I am reaching or following through to the same spot, it is a lot more consistent.
Same here. I can attribute at least 90% of my flyers to some degree of plucking associated with a follow thru issue. Ask any Olympic archer, MLB pitcher, or PGA golfer how important follow through is……it’s everything. Try stopping your golf swing the split second after contact and see how you score. The follow thru is as integral as any other phase of the shot process and I guarantee you won’t find a single world class shooter that won’t say the same thing.
 

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It helps me be more consistent with my release. If I am not "reaching " for my ear lobe after the shot, my release hand might go out, down, wherever. Problem is "where ever" is not consistent and if the hand starts the wherever journey before string is completely released, it often ends in an outward pluck for me.

If I am reaching or following through to the same spot, it is a lot more consistent.

The issue with "where ever" is not in follow through but in your alignment which is not consistent shot after shot. You can educate yourself to touch your ear and in videos you can see how the string hand makes a big arc instead of straight movement back. Wondering why it missed because you touched your ear - and this was a sign of "good" follow through - is the worth situation to be into.
 

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when I focus more on good follow-thru my accuracy is a little more consistent.
I also find this to be true. By not dropping the bow arm too soon after the loose, it helps me before the loose...that brief window of time where I really don't know what I'm doing.
 

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I think the value of follow through is that its much better than actively trying to maintain a "static" release.
Some people try to completely stop there hand from moving at all and that requires counteracting the slight jump back that naturally happens if you simply relax your hand for release - this isnt constructive.

But the elaborate flying hand thing - if it works for you fine, but people shoot fine without doing it.
 

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I think it's more important what you do with your bow hand than your string hand. I have a slight motion with my string hand, and I work to stay solid with by how hand.
 

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“Follow through” is just a by product of good back tension so if you haven’t got that, your follow through will be forced, leading to plucks.


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Jake is super duper. - lbg
 
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Bow arm matters a whole lot, string arm just has to maintain inline with the arrow and recoil naturally.
 

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When I forget to 'think' about my follow through during my shot process, my shots don't feel as right as they do when I focus on it. Usually if I'm rushing my shots which I shouldn't do anyway. But when I remember to put it in my process, my shots feel more fluid. I definitively think it's important. For me my follow through consists of keeping bow arm up and pointed at the target and brushing my face with my draw hand on the way back past my ear. Otherwise I have a tendency to pluck the string or my hand goes out and away from my face on follow through which doesn't always lead to the best shots.
 

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Draven your reply to me is not correct. If you watched me shoot and had an idea of my anchor and form , maybe.

The Jake K video. He shoots a low anchor and his hand ends below his ear at his neck.

I have a higher anchor. If my alignment is good, just the expansion of my back as Jake teaches puts my hand from my anchor to my ear lobe. They are in a perfect alignment path.

When you are at anchor with proper alignment, the next direction of movement determines your release.

From anchor, you have to be consistent in that next step which is what I have always viewed as follow through. That may be the incorrect analogy of follow through, but the actual back expansion to me is part of the release, and follow through.

If I miss, I usually know why. Do I get sloppy, yep, but I know how to pull it back together most of the time.


Not everyone shoots an Oly style anchor and will have that flourish style follow through.

Look at Howard Hill and then look at Jake.

Both successful, both consistent in their form and I believe boh understood the cause and effect of what they do with each movement
 

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Broncman, it was not necessary an answer to you. Refer to the video above to understand why even if initially coaches are teaching the archer a motion that ends "there", they don't teach it as action but reaction. That video shows 4 follow through and most of us fall in the "natural follow through" which is "taught" usually through alignment awareness at full draw and sustained mental focus on the target until the arrow hits it.
 
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