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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, noob here. So, ive posted in archerytalk and would now like your guys' opinion. I have a bear grizzly recurve, 50# at 28", but my DL is 25". I just got some Easton axis traditional arrows, 500 spined, cut to 26.5, fletched with 5" shields. Now, I know this seems quite stiff, but they've been shooting perfectly for a while now. Is there any reason to formally tune them if theyre already shooting perfectly? Thanks in advance fellas
 

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Archery is feel and fit. And if it fits and feels right, it's as good as it gets. There are techniques because some of us are still looking. There is no formal tuning, you hit the spot you don't need to formally do anything but buy a round to celebrate. Although you've got an amazing talent if you are perfect with that set up.
 

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If they're flying perfectly, great! Try shooting a bare shaft to varify it.The bare shaft tells you what your arrow wants to do without the fletching correcting it. If your bare shaft groups with your fletched at 30 yards (maybe slightly weak and low) you're doing pretty good, if not, you would benefit from some formal tuning.:2cents:
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys!! Ill try some bareshaft tuning this week. If it turns out I need to tune, im kinda SOL because theyre all already cut to 26.5
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Another question, what are the downsides of an arrow that is too stiff? I know I might need to tune, but currently my 5" feathers are taking care of the downfalls. So, with that being said, im getting perfect flight and shots with arrows that are probably too stiff. Is too stiff bad?
 

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Any variance from a good state of tune is bad. Stiff, weak, whatever, too much one way or the other....not good.

You're losing cast/speed, accuracy, forgiveness, and if hunting you're losing potential penetration.

Also given that you're depending on big ol' 5" fletching to cover up any errors you're losing even MORE downrange speed and penetration due to drag.

Probably not what you want to hear but them's the facts.
 

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For a right handed shooter, too stiff will shoot to the left of where you are aiming. The longer the shot the more this will show up. Too stiff will also be less forgiving of form variance/release glitches. For hunting, poor flight will reduce penetration.
There is also the confidence factor. If you know your arrows are flying as good as they can, you know they will go where you send them.
It's also more fun to watch arrows fly that ain't waggin' their tail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
wow, thanks a lot guys. I only shoot at my local indoor 20 yard range and a max of 30 yards when camping. I don't do any hunting, but you've convinced me to tune my arrows. thanks again!!
 

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No! Don't do it. If they are going where you are looking your are good to go. Don't bareshaft; it might not come out as you wish and that will mess with your mind.

Wait until you are lose or damage a few and are feeling short of arrows. Do your testing then, so you will have an idea what to order. Until then enjoy what you have and don't worry about it. I find bareshafting hard on my confidence with a hunting weight rig. Maybe with a full on ILF target rig, but not with an off the shelf griz. Just shoot and enjoy. - lbg
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
No! Don't do it. If they are going where you are looking your are good to go. Don't bareshaft; it might not come out as you wish and that will mess with your mind.

Wait until you are lose or damage a few and are feeling short of arrows. Do your testing then, so you will have an idea what to order. Until then enjoy what you have and don't worry about it. I find bareshafting hard on my confidence with a hunting weight rig. Maybe with a full on ILF target rig, but not with an off the shelf griz. Just shoot and enjoy. - lbg
longbowguy, you just lifted a big weight off my shoulders haha! I appreciate the advice ive gotten here, the guys are great, but I agree with you. Im pretty OCD about my setup in archery and my firearms. Maybe I should just keep it the way I have it, as ive been pulling the best groups I ever have just in the past couple months. Youre completely right, if bareshafting doesn't go the way I want it itll completely mess with my mind and bank account.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thanks a ton to all of you! I think im just gonna stick with what I have now. My setup is doing ok and if I tune im just gonna blow money I don't have. Again, thanks fellas, I really appreciate your help
 

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Wow! This is weird, Steve (lbg) and I like hardly ever disagree. Maybe that's because he kinda actually knows what he's doing :)

Given an interest in learning to tune, then it should be pursued. Its something that needs to be learned at some point any way. And if you look at it, its even good practice as getting good results call for the shooter to really buckle down and shoot their best form.

But Mefferd I do get lbg's point. You could just keep shooting for a little while for practice, and once you get one or two with jacked up fletching, sacrifice them to bare shaft tuning.

Now one thing about bare shafting is that generally a shooter makes an initial shaft choice, and then begins the process with full length uncut shafts. That way he knows that unless he seriously screwed up his selection, he should initially see results showing that his arrows are weak.

Although your arrows are already cut pretty short, you may not be totally SOL. When you do get around to bareshafting you may be able to load up a heavier point to correct them if they do actually prove to be too stiff. Maybe even get a selection of point weights on hand before yo get into it.

3 Rivers has field point test kits that give you a small assortment of screw in field point weights

http://www.3riversarchery.com/Screw-In+Field+Point+Test+Kit+-+516_iCF5-T_baseitem.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow! This is weird, Steve (lbg) and I like hardly ever disagree. Maybe that's because he kinda actually knows what he's doing :)

Given an interest in learning to tune, then it should be pursued. Its something that needs to be learned at some point any way. And if you look at it, its even good practice as getting good results call for the shooter to really buckle down and shoot their best form.

But Mefferd I do get lbg's point. You could just keep shooting for a little while for practice, and once you get one or two with jacked up fletching, sacrifice them to bare shaft tuning.

Now one thing about bare shafting is that generally a shooter makes an initial shaft choice, and then begins the process with full length uncut shafts. That way he knows that unless he seriously screwed up his selection, he should initially see results showing that his arrows are weak.

Although your arrows are already cut pretty short, you may not be totally SOL. When you do get around to bareshafting you may be able to load up a heavier point to correct them if they do actually prove to be too stiff. Maybe even get a selection of point weights on hand before yo get into it.

3 Rivers has field point test kits that give you a small assortment of screw in field point weights

http://www.3riversarchery.com/Screw-In+Field+Point+Test+Kit+-+516_iCF5-T_baseitem.html
thanks rednef! Ill try bareshafting when I lose some fletching, but like you said, im not so sure I even can since my arrows are cut pretty short. theyre cut to 26.5 and my DL is 25; I don't think I have much room to work with haha
 

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The main thing is to keep it fun, we do this for recreation. For me, tuning IS part of the fun. Enjoy the journey.
 

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FWIW, I'm in LBG's camp!!

Bare shaft tuning is a 2 edged sword. IF your shot execution is NOT perfect, bareshafts will amplify execution errors. Then, how do you decide if it is arrow "tune" or form errors that are producing the BS flight characteristics?

Here is an example. You shoot a bare shaft and it flies tail left (right handed shooter). Now, how do you determine whether the shaft is weak OR you muffed the release??

Many shooters use bare shafts to check their shot execution (form) AND Bare shafting has its place in tuning but unless you are totally confident that the arrow flight is not a result of form, you COULD end up just chasing your tail.

Just suggesting that MOST reasons for bare shafts to fly showing a tuning problem is from your shot execution and not necessarily a "tuning" issue.
 

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Just a tip
If your bare shaft impacts with fletched arrows, your broadhead tipped arrows will do the same, so if your shooting stiff arrows, your broadheads will shoot left of fletched arrows, same with weak spine arrows but to the right.
Just depends on what you want to do with your shooting.

Chad
 

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FWIW, I always keep a couple bare shafts out when I make up arrows, then throw them in during my shooting sessions. Yes there are occasional flyers due to form flaws, but over time I can see if I'm tuned well. One session shooting bare shafts may not tell you the whole story.
 

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In my opinion bare shaft tuning is really not very difficult, but it does require some skill and consistency on the part of the shooter. For practicing and improving your shooting abilities, good arrow flight is all that really counts and with field points that can often be accomplished with big helical fletching.

I don't know if you are intending to hunt or not but broadheads are not nearly as forgiving on the front of an arrow as a field point. If hunting is on the horizon the sooner you figure out your setup the better. Since you will probably be tuning with point weight unless you buy different arrows, tune to the best of your ability and then buy broadheads of the same weight.

I wouldn't buy different arrows until you try tuning what you have though. I would confirm your .500s are too stiff before you spend the money on other shafts otherwise you are just guessing again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks moe! Yeah, I agree. I'm going to hold off on tuning until I lose some fletching. Thanks again!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
FWIW, I'm in LBG's camp!!

Bare shaft tuning is a 2 edged sword. IF your shot execution is NOT perfect, bareshafts will amplify execution errors. Then, how do you decide if it is arrow "tune" or form errors that are producing the BS flight characteristics?

Here is an example. You shoot a bare shaft and it flies tail left (right handed shooter). Now, how do you determine whether the shaft is weak OR you muffed the release??

Many shooters use bare shafts to check their shot execution (form) AND Bare shafting has its place in tuning but unless you are totally confident that the arrow flight is not a result of form, you COULD end up just chasing your tail.

Just suggesting that MOST reasons for bare shafts to fly showing a tuning problem is from your shot execution and not necessarily a "tuning" issue.
Thanks Moe! that just made me feel a lot better haha. I slept on it, and decided to not tune until I lose some fletching and have perfect form. Thank you!
 
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