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I joined TradTalk a few months back as I had just recently taken up Archery again after several decades. I have found this blog very helpful on getting up to speed on how best to re-learn long forgotten skills and also acquire all the knowledge that helps one hone those skills. THANK YOU ALL again.

I do historical research and thought I'd contribute something I think you all as Archers might find of interest.

Recently I was doing some research into the history of the Duke of Wellington/his heirs and the Battle of Waterloo as my GG Grandfather served under the Duke at Waterloo. And according to his obit - my GG grandfather even met Napolean as he was departing for exile in St. Helena.

An interesting Archery-related bit of history came from a more recent period. It seems in WWII, the 5th Duke of Wellington was a British commando who died in a fierce firefight near Selermo,Italy during the Allied invasion there. One rather interesting person mentioned in this history was 'FIGHTING JACK CHURCHILL.' Further research revealed him to be quite the eccentric but hard fighting soldier.

And one of the most unique things about 'Fighting Jack' - he carried both a Sword and a Bow into combat with him!

Fortunately I found a very detailed but interesting article about his life and times and thought I would share it with you all as it is a fascinating story with some unique ties to Archery.

Profiles Column
July 2005 World War II History Magazine

Fighting Jack Churchill survived a wartime odyssey beyond compare.

By Robert Barr Smith

The opening line of the story begins:

"It is not recorded what the German commander said when he learned that one of his men had been spitted by a broad-head arrow."
LOL - ouch!

The final line of the story:

"Churchill was one of that rare and happy breed for whom war is their element. That does not mean that he did not hate the suffering that war caused; it was simply that he thrived on the excitement and relished the chance to achieve and excel. His whole philosophy was pretty well summed up by a couplet he scribbled on a postcard he sent to a friend, a card whose face bore the regimental colors:

"No Prince or Lord has tomb so proud / As he whose flag becomes his shroud."

Now that is a very fine sentiment that I, as a veteran, can appreciate.

Here is the URL for the story

http://www.wwiihistorymagazine.com/2005/july/col-profiles.html

I hope you enjoy this bit of history as much as I did... pjh
 

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Welcome to the forum - interesting for the history!
 
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Torc. You're off to a good star here. Welcome. There are a few lovers of History mixed in among us here......
 
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Barefaced tightropewalker
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Torc. You're off to a good star here. Welcome. There are a few lovers of History mixed in among us here......
.............. and a few examples of living history. Particularly one.
 
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