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Discussion Starter #1
I've been shooting over a year now and there is a progress but yesterday I released that all the hard work with my form (bale work for getting my back working) was a waste of time. All my plucking and arm-pulling is back, especially when there is stress involved and I try to be as accurate as possible. It's not easy to just work on your form when everybody else in the room is trying to hit tens.
I know what I need to do is more bale work but I also want to attend some tournaments, clubshootings and so on but I hate my style, it's ugly although I'm accurate with it.
What do you experienced guys think, is it possible to improve your form slowly while competing?
 

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Sounds like you've spent a lot of time creating a shot sequence which doesn't have any aiming in it. That seems to happen to quite a few people when they commit to shooting nothing but the bale and it's part of the reason that some of the worlds best Olympic coaches (Vittorio Frangili specifically) recommend against it. He considers extensive use of the bale to be a sure-fire recipe for target panic and I find that my experiences agree. It's great for trying something new and isolating that form item, but it's a very poor way to learn a shot sequence.
I think you need to commit to mastering the correct form while also including aiming in your shot sequence. That will include time at the bale but with an aiming point. The important thing is to reject any shot that isn't good and start over. If you can use this opportunity to master than skill they you will have gained by the experience.

-Grant
 
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""I hate my style, it's ugly although I'm accurate with it."'

When you are competing, your target says way more than your 'style.'
 
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Discussion Starter #4
I must add that accuracy with this plucking-style is only till 20 m or so. After that it sort of falls apart, groups go wider, it's the price I pay for my bad form.
 

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Sounds like you've spent a lot of time creating a shot sequence which doesn't have any aiming in it. That seems to happen to quite a few people when they commit to shooting nothing but the bale and it's part of the reason that some of the worlds best Olympic coaches (Vittorio Frangili specifically) recommend against it. He considers extensive use of the bale to be a sure-fire recipe for target panic and I find that my experiences agree. It's great for trying something new and isolating that form item, but it's a very poor way to learn a shot sequence.
I think you need to commit to mastering the correct form while also including aiming in your shot sequence. That will include time at the bale but with an aiming point. The important thing is to reject any shot that isn't good and start over. If you can use this opportunity to master than skill they you will have gained by the experience.

-Grant
Do Grants and this;
 

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My two cents worth is to develop the best form you can….and that means to find what is most consistent for you! It doesn't necessarily have to be a representation of someone else's "good form"…just what's best for you.

Training/bale/Bridge etc are all ways to bring the shot you're working on to the target so that the best results are achieved… Expecting to improve your form while competing, IMO, is unrealistic. There are things to be learned from competing though.

Finally, rely on your focused dedicated efforts to improve. Get AND LISTEN TO, good coaching… and Enjoy your archery. The learning and shooting should be enjoyable! All the best!

Tom
 

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You might try combining the bale with aiming toward the end of the session. That proved to be my best bet. My bale time is spent probably 60/40, closing my eyes and working on the feel of a good shot for the majority of the session and then opening them while still at bale distance and bringing aiming back in by shooting at a small spot like a strand of hay or hole in the target from a previous shot. If you make a "less than" shot, close your eyes and work on feel for a little longer.
 
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