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Well as the name implies they are faster, better? That depends on you, the archer. Many swear by them. and if Rick Barbee makes you one you will not be disappointed. I have a number of his strings both FF "Skinny" and Dacron, I personally prefer the Dacron string, alas, he no longer makes strings using Dacron.
 

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Simply put, FF is non-stretch, much more so than DACRON or B-50.
When bow hits brace after the shot, there is a lot of "shock" for lack of a better term, and FF require reinforced limb tips to handle it.
A lot of the older bows do not have the reinforced tips, so Dacron or B-50 (interchangeable terms) is required there.
Dacron or B--50 stretches a bit, "gives" at the shot, so is easier on the bow tips.
For all practical purposes the "shock" I speak of is all bow-related, not sensed or felt by the shooter.
 

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Fast flight is the nickname for modern, low-stretch string materials. "Fast Flight" was a originally a specific brand name, yet now has become the generic term for low-stretch materials ... just like how we use "kleenex" for "tissue".

Low-stretch isn't better ... it's functionally different than Dacron depending upon the archer's needs. "Better" is in the hands and opinion of the beholder on this one.

Before low-stretch materials was the Dacron (B50). Good stuff then and now. However, modern bows are often made with reinforced limb tips to accommodate the low-stretch nature of the modern materials to prevent damage to the bow. Older bow makers never thought about changing materials in the future, and built their bows for the Dacron of the day.

You can use the older Dacron material on any bow, but you need to be careful using the modern low-stretch materials on older bows. Debate rages, yet some folk use the low-stretch on older bows and enjoy its performance.

A bow will perform well with the appropriate string. If the Grizzly was designed with Dacron in mind, it will perform well with that type of string ... that is the nature of the bow' design.

There's a Super Grizzly designed for low-stretch strings. Better? Dunno. The "old days" produced some amazing bows that are still in happy service sporting Dacron strings.

Hope this helps.

(Edit: Steve, sorry to repeat yer speech ... I was typing as you posted.)
 

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I wouldn't buy a new bow that couldn't handle a FF type string, full-stop wouldn't do it. I've also considered doing phenolic tips on some of my older bows to enable them to use newer materials.
There is no bow which will perform better with Dacron then with FF, just some that might not last doing it.

-Grant
 

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I have read much on this and many of the well know string maker say it is the size of the string fit in the nock tips that are crucial to older bows being able to handle FF, hence the padded loops.

I don't think any will give you a guarantee though!
 

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I wouldn't buy a new bow that couldn't handle a FF type string, full-stop wouldn't do it. I've also considered doing phenolic tips on some of my older bows to enable them to use newer materials.
There is no bow which will perform better with Dacron then with FF, just some that might not last doing it.

-Grant
Nor would I Grant, and it may well be that "no bow will preform better with Dacron than with FF...": However and it may well be that I'm an "ole stick in the mud," I much prefer Dacron over the new FF type of string.: shooting:
 

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Fast Flight strings were first used on compounds and someone started to try them on traditional bows for some extra speed. The strings are lighter and stronger allowing less strands and stretch. Most users claim they are quieter as well due to less vibration.

Unless the bow maker specifically authorizes their use on the bow, I would not put them on any bow.
 
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