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Does an elevated rest give you a competitive advantage?

  • Yes

    Votes: 49 79.0%
  • No

    Votes: 13 21.0%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you believe that an elevated rest gives you a competitive advantage over an off the shelf set-up?

Yes

No


Would like to know why you think either answer is true.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
My partner just texted from the McAlester OK. shoot that they no longer allow elevated rests in recurve. I cancelled at the last minute but was glad I didn't show up with my warf which I have always shot there. Still would have been fun, but I want to win it one of these days.
 

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Many people can shoot better with an elevated rest or at least have an easier time tuning.

But this idea of shooting 3 piece and metal riser bows with of the shelf because its "traditional" is an absurd joke perpetrated by the trad police.

I understand with self bows and one piece longbows - its a questionable proposition with one piece recurves as many trad recurves historically had elevated rests.
But its totally absurd for take down bows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If an elevated rest DIDN'T give you an advantage, there wouldn't be rules in some classes banning them. IMO
That's what I want to know...What is the advantage?
 

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I shoot a 3-piece ILF off the shelf. Can also use an elevated rest but the advantage is slight. (At my modest level of shooting.) Ease of tuning is more important to me and the lower plunger hole makes that a breeze.

So, it's an advantage IF you can take advantage of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What is the slight advantage?

I shoot an elevated rest (springy) to make it easier to shoot vanes. I want to shoot vanes to get around wet weather, especially on limited day hunts.

Are vanes more accurate? Don't think so.

Is the elevated rest closer to your hand like some people say is important to good trad shooting? No.

What is the advantage? Or is this all about wood vs. metal? My elk hunting pard's Border BD has an elevated rest in it's plunger hole. Is it about certain wood bows, some wood bows, fiberglass bows?
 

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-An elevated rest will give more clearance for vanes/feathers.

-An elevated rest will give a softer contact surface(this is the same reason thats some people use think hair rests.)

The idea behind both of these advantages is that it makes the bow more forgiving of you being inconstant in your shot.


The closer to your hand thing is a hokum IMO.
 

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I voted "Yes"...cause an elevated rest does offer advantages and does so in a number of ways.

Advantage #1: It gets the arrow up and closer too your eye closing the gap and?...

Advantage #2: Does so without having to resort to a ridiculously high anchor and?..

Advantage #3: You may now shoot vanes. (consistently)

Advantage #4: You will now experience and elevated level of forgiveness VS launching arrow off a leather covered hard shelf.

But there is one downside...if you employ a rapid style of shot execution?...having the arrow positioned that far above your bow hand is (still doable but?) not a good thing.
 

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If you are a hunter, easier to keep the arrow on an elevated rest vs shelf if you hang it up in a tree stand

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I disagree because if the archer is savvy enough to know all the little tricks of the trade when shooting off the shelf?...they do things like this...

This is J.D. Berry's "Personal" Misty Dawn Longbow he sent me to try where his arrow retention system was a well shaped and positioned wedge of leather inserted between the bows handle and it's leather wrapped grip like so...



But there are also other innovative methods of retaining arrows on their shelves that Bowyers of old often times employed such as this "Grooved Shelf" on my Tom Martini Yarak "Pure Poison" Longbow...



which is capable of retaining an 11/32 cedar shaft even when held in a reverse cant position nearly 90 degrees too the world....



and these are just two examples of old school ingenuity that is rapidly becoming...."Lost Knowledge & Know-How" :(
 

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I disagree because if the archer is savvy enough to know all the little tricks of the trade when shooting off the shelf?...they do things like this...

This is J.D. Berry's "Personal" Misty Dawn Longbow he sent me to try where his arrow retention system was a well shaped and positioned wedge of leather inserted between the bows handle and it's leather wrapped grip like so...



But there are also other innovative methods of retaining arrows on their shelves that Bowyers of old often times employed such as this "Grooved Shelf" on my Tom Martini Yarak "Pure Poison" Longbow...



which is capable of retaining an 11/32 cedar shaft even when held in a reverse cant position nearly 90 degrees too the world....



and these are just two examples of old school ingenuity that is rapidly becoming...."Lost Knowledge & Know-How" :(
Don't worry jinks. Those aren't loss tricks. I already passed them down to my oldest son (4). I still use them on all my shelf bows. I don't cant the arrow unless I spot and stalk in open country. In the tree, it's too much screwing around. No different than the rubber bands, after market holders, etc. Best solution for shooting off shelf on the tree is keep it on your lap or use the grooved shelf in a upright holder. When using the grooved shelf I either hang the bow with the arrow to the tree or use a third hand bow holder on my weak side.

Blustery, cold conditions in the November..my bow is in my lap when shooting off the shelf or on my strong side in a third hand holder with the elevated rest, quiver off.

Sorry for the rant but I have a pretty strong opinion and protocol when it comes to killing stuff. I spend much more time in the woods than in front of a practice target. Thanks for your opinion regardless. It's good to keep the young hunters informed.

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I figger there MUST be an advantage to elevated rest, but danged if I can detail it.
I figger the Olympic shooters use ER for a reason, but - not for ease of tuning, as they are likely tuning MASTERs - so danged if I can see a reason.
I think I can shoot my shelf bows as well as my rigs with ER.
Also, the elevated rest is only elevating the shaft ? 1/4" or 3/8" higher than a shelf covered with whatever, and if a guy wants HEIGHT for shaft, it is easily accomplished with a shelf BUMP, which negates any perceived height advantage given to an elevated rest.
see the CD risers and their high shelf bumps....I figger those are as high as most shelf bumps people use.
It would be INTERESTING for a top shooter owning a CD riser to shoot & tune it with both shelf and ER & then shoot a ton of arrows with both, and report in here.
Me, I shoot both shelf and ER, and I can't say there's a difference......but I yam sooo not a top shooter.
HA, I saw the poll, I'm one of the 2 NO votes.
 
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Easier to tune. Only advantage I can think of besides the vane thing. Seems to be almost a cottage industry in trying to ferret out any perceived/real advantage where 3D's and unsanctioned shoots are concerned. International, State, and Country organizations have rules. Pretty simple to shoot those, or not, depending on your equipment and desire to compete in a particular format.
It's the local pumpkin rolling's that draw the most controversy because lots of time rules are made based on flawed perceptions of what is "traditional".
If "traditional" means what "they" did in the 50's and early 60's, nobody gave a hoot what rest you had, arrow material, where your fingers were, etc.. You either shot a sight or not. Objects placed between the shooting lines and targets at regional championships were common, prisms were used, and if someone consistently proved that the way they shot won a lot, people tried to match that piece of equipment or style to be competitive. Way to many needless rules today, in my opinion. Usually the best shot wins, regardless of rules and equipment restrictions.
 

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Thank you Larry, very well put.


Something that hasn't been mentioned is using under the rest as a gap/hold over, I do it all the time, hard to do with a shelf, then I just gap at the target :)

Chad
 

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Not for me because I don't use them, unless a bump in between the shelf and rug is considered an elevated rest...don't know...don't care.
 

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One thing to consider,

Is the riser designed for an elevated rest or to be shot off the shelf?

This question does not have to do with shelf shape or size, rather about optimum limb balance. Some of my limb testing has address limb balance. Changing the arrow location, changes the nock height, which changes the balance of the bow. I would suggest that if your bow was designed to achieve optimum balance off the shelf, then it may shoot equal to or better than in that configuration. I still think that there is an inherent advantage to a rest. What this argument implies is that ILF risers designed to be shot off of a rest, will be best shot off a rest. For hunting style risers it really depends on how they were engineered.
 
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