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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m pretty new to archery and have only shot off the shelf. I recently ordered a Hoyt Satori and am being swayed towards an elevated rest. Any recommendations on what rest and plunger would be appreciated.
 

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What are you planning on using it for?
I don't hunt, but quiet, reliable, and durable seem to win in that department based on reading a lot on this forum. I have some plastic rests that screw into the plunger hole and have a little cushion side tab on them. That's probably what I'd go with if I ever hunt. Super cheap.

If you don't care how loud it is then a flipper like the Spiga ZT, or the AAE Freeflyte Elite are a good choice. The Freeflyte is a bit sturdier for stringwalking if that's your thing.

I have had good luck with the Shibuya DX plunger, and I have a magnetic plunger that I like a lot (can't remember off hand what brand it is). Right now I have the Shibuya as my indoor 20m plunger, and the magnetic one for various distances outside (easy to adjust on the fly if needed).

Tool Font Metal Dagger Blade
 

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I shot with the Spigarelli ZT for a few years and it seemed very durable to me, I paired that up wit the Shibuya DX cushion plunger. The NAP Cente Rest is simpler, quieter, cheaper, and it is pretty bombproof, there’s not much that could happen to it. Just set it for you center shot adjustment and done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I shot with the Spigarelli ZT for a few years and it seemed very durable to me, I paired that up wit the Shibuya DX cushion plunger. The NAP Cente Rest is simpler, quieter, cheaper, and it is pretty bombproof, there’s not much that could happen to it. Just set it for you center shot adjustment and done.
Thanks, I really like simplicity but there are few things I’m really liking about a cushion plunger. I’m gonna shoot less than perfect for a long time so something that will absorb some of that lateral deflection will hopefully tighten up my group a bit. Fortunately it’s not too expensive if it’s not for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
What are you planning on using it for?
I don't hunt, but quiet, reliable, and durable seem to win in that department based on reading a lot on this forum. I have some plastic rests that screw into the plunger hole and have a little cushion side tab on them. That's probably what I'd go with if I ever hunt. Super cheap.

If you don't care how loud it is then a flipper like the Spiga ZT, or the AAE Freeflyte Elite are a good choice. The Freeflyte is a bit sturdier for stringwalking if that's your thing.

I have had good luck with the Shibuya DX plunger, and I have a magnetic plunger that I like a lot (can't remember off hand what brand it is). Right now I have the Shibuya as my indoor 20m plunger, and the magnetic one for various distances outside (easy to adjust on the fly if needed).

View attachment 37345
Thanks, I’m mostly just going to be flinging arrows behind the house but I would love to take a deer in the next year or two. I like quite and simple but I’m leaning towards a cushion plunger and flipper if it might help improve accuracy. I appreciate the advice.
 

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Thanks, I’m mostly just going to be flinging arrows behind the house but I would love to take a deer in the next year or two. I like quite and simple but I’m leaning towards a cushion plunger and flipper if it might help improve accuracy. I appreciate the advice.
How is your accuracy now? What size are your groups? If you have a 4" group at 20yds how close will it be to your point of aim? Or, if you score your rounds what kind of score are you getting, and at what distance?

If your form is causing problems with arrow flight I would hold off on the plunger until you have that under control a bit. At best the plunger could correct a bad release ( a little bit), at worst it will be another thing that you fiddle with trying to chase better arrow flight when the focus/time would be better spent sending arrows down range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
How is your accuracy now? What size are your groups? If you have a 4" group at 20yds how close will it be to your point of aim? Or, if you score your rounds what kind of score are you getting, and at what distance?

If your form is causing problems with arrow flight I would hold off on the plunger until you have that under control a bit. At best the plunger could correct a bad release ( a little bit), at worst it will be another thing that you fiddle with trying to chase better arrow flight when the focus/time would be better spent sending arrows down range.
At 20 yds I’m between a 4-6” group. I’m gonna talk with the owner at the archery store when I pick up my new bow about recommended arrows too. I understand there is nothing that’s going to help my groups more than proper form/consistency and time on spent shooting.
 

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Honestly, I think it is hard to beat a cheap stick-on rest with a plunger or simple bolt. Olympic Medals have been won with $3.00 Hoyt stick-on rests.

On my ILF, I use a Hoyt Hunter rest. It has a hole built in. I then use a flat-head bolt in the berger hole with a piece of velcro covering it. It costs $3, is indestructible, extremely forgiving, and I can cant my bow towards the arrow and it won't fall off. It's perfect for hunting. I much prefer it to any other elevated set-up I have tried.
 

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Thanks, I really like simplicity but there are few things I’m really liking about a cushion plunger. I’m gonna shoot less than perfect for a long time so something that will absorb some of that lateral deflection will hopefully tighten up my group a bit. Fortunately it’s not too expensive if it’s not for me.
I think a proper spined but not overly spined arrow is a better way because you will have more consistency. With a cushion plunger you will add variables with trying to coordinate center shot setting, which spring to use, and then spring tension setting which will vary in effect due to you center shot adjustments. This maybe fine for a seasoned archer but not for someone starting out.
Although I’m only into traditional archery three years I spent my first 20 years with compounds shooting off my fingers with a flipper rest and a Burger (cushion 🪠 ) button.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Honestly, I think it is hard to beat a cheap stick-on rest with a plunger or simple bolt. Olympic Medals have been won with $3.00 Hoyt stick-on rests.

On my ILF, I use a Hoyt Hunter rest. It has a hole built in. I then use a flat-head bolt in the berger hole with a piece of velcro covering it. It costs $3, is indestructible, extremely forgiving, and I can cant my bow towards the arrow and it won't fall off. It's perfect for hunting. I much prefer it to any other elevated set-up I have tried.
That sounds like a great set up. I suppose for the cost it wouldn’t hurt to start there. If it works for me there would be no reason to change anything.
 
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