Trad Talk Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently had a discussion with a friend of mine, who indicated that he begins his draw above his head, and drops the bow down as he draws. I indicated that I start with the bow low, and the bow comes up as I draw.

This of course led us to a discussion of which is "better". I don't see many people draw the way he explained, but he argues that it engages the back better. This seems to make sense...

For those of you who are familiar with the two, and have sources to back up what you do (either way) please share. I tend to think drawing "up" makes more sense (especially since a lot of Olympic shooters do this...) but have no real evidence that it is "better".

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
To add a twist to this:

I draw staight back, with the arrow pointing at the target as I draw.

I essntially "aim" at the target, as I draw.

When near full draw, I go from low wrist to high wrist and finish aiming at the same time..

Same priciple as, in golf, where you concentrate on your back swing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,355 Posts
That "Sky Draw" is usually the product of shooting compounds, trying to overcome too much weight. Maybe I've lead a sheltered life but I rarely see anyone draw much past horizontal with a bare bow. Normally I start slightly below my spot and draw straight back to anchor, engaging the back muscles in the latter part of the draw and pulling through until the shot occurs.
 

·
Barefaced tightropewalker
Joined
·
8,512 Posts
The high draw lowers the shoulders as you drop down and also helps get the correct back muscles involved. It doesn't have to be dramatic. A close look at some of the Korean ladies and you will see a slight high draw.
The difference between a 'sky draw' and a 'high draw' is the angle of the arrow at predraw. With a high draw it is level. With a 'sky draw' it is pointing up. One is allowed in competition and one isn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
I recently had a discussion with a friend of mine, who indicated that he begins his draw above his head, and drops the bow down as he draws. I indicated that I start with the bow low, and the bow comes up as I draw.

This of course led us to a discussion of which is "better". I don't see many people draw the way he explained, but he argues that it engages the back better. This seems to make sense...
Check out Brady Ellison's above-the-head method, I've copied it for myself and like it very much because it helps me engage my back muscles. A complete example of his draw can be seen at about 1:30 minutes into the video:

 

·
Barefaced tightropewalker
Joined
·
8,512 Posts
Here is a high draw from a BB archer.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
641 Posts
High draw, per Greyside's very cogent description. My bow hand rises to the height of my forehead and my drawing hand to eye level, then both level down to a lowish anchor.

Yet the most compelling reason I do this is that it puts the least stress on the rotator cuff of my drawing shoulder, which has seen far better days. Also allows back muscles to engage smoothly without undue "bad" torque on the rotator. In this case "no pain is gain" . . .

Regards,

Salskov
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thinking about my draw, I start my draw by hooking with the arrow down, my bow comes up above eye level slightly and then settles onto target at anchor. Similar to that youtube video, just not as high during draw maybe?

I think what I was envisioning was more of a mongol draw.

Kinda like this?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
That was an impressive video. While dealing with my target panic in the past month I switched to a higher draw. I don't have the study, but somebody on here said it helps engage the back. I have a whole new shot sequence, but that feels true.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top