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Discussion Starter #1
which of these will have better sight marks through the full range of target shooting distances.

300 grains at 200fps

600 grains at 200fps


ie. which one will shoot flatter at 90m


no drag co-effiecents. just pure mass....
 

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Not talking about in a vacuum or anything silly like that are we?

Because even with arrows that were IDENTICAL in every way but weight the heavier one would have a higher sectional density, which would lead to better ballistics.

-Grant
 
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Discussion Starter #3
that will be why the x10 shaft is no featherweight...
and its sold as a 70m and 90 meter arrow.


there must be a paper or document that looks at ballistics vs momentum or some form of mass vs speed...
 

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The tungsten points are 120gr, not 120g. That is the weight of several arrows!
From what I've picked up it's the shorter shank on the tungsten point which changes the nodes on the arrow, but I have no idea what the benefit is.

At the 70m and 90m arrow diameter seems to be king. Wind is the factor much more than just drop though. Just judging by the results turned in by women who are shooting much shorter and lighter arrows it seems that weight alone is less important then horizontal area.

I think that until someone truly builds a thinner arrow we aren't likely to see any increase in scores at the longer distances. It will have to be significant as well, likely beyond the scope of current materials. Graphene perhaps?

-Grant
 

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there must be a paper or document that looks at ballistics vs momentum or some form of mass vs speed...
I am surprised there is no ballistic program for archery.

I shot Field Target Air rifle for a long time. We had a program called "Chairgun" designed in the UK. This allowed you to work out the BC of your pellets , click charts, retained energy, speed at all distances,compensation for temperature and altitude, wind drift etc. etc.
 

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There are ballistic programs for archery. I wrote one. There are commercially available sight tape programs which do this. I will have to dig it out and see what I get. There is someone else on this site that recently put one together and actually distributed it. Maybe he will chime in.
 
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I wonder why we don't end up seeing arrows that are essentially a super skinny solid carbon shaft? I know I noticed a huge difference in my sight marks when I switched over to ACEs from X7 shafts.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
im trying to work out if dropping 10fps but gaining substancial weight in arrow mass give better cast.
if mass gives better cast...then thier must be a cross over point where lowering arrow mass doesnt deliver any gains
 

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It likely won't improve cast to drop 10fps. But it might improve downrange accuracy and it definitely WILL improve downrange energy.

-Grant
 

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biggest issue I have is I can shoot a 300gr arrow 200fps out of my recurve. but I'm not Hoss enough to shoot a 600gr arrow 200 fps out of any recurve. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #14
lets say you can shoot 6gpp at 220fps or 8gpp at 215. which would you rather have?
 

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8gpp at 215 all day.
 

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which of these will have better sight marks through the full range of target shooting distances.

300 grains at 200fps

600 grains at 200fps

ie. which one will shoot flatter at 90m

no drag co-effiecents. just pure mass....
200fps is 200fps & the pull of gravity is the same regardless the weight, in a vacuum.

In the real world, with identical drag, the advantage would go to the shaft with the most mass, Flatter at any distance in front of the bow.

Google up "Martindales Calaulators".
They have some on archery and a lot on ballistics in general that should help.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
From what I've picked up it's the shorter shank on the tungsten point which changes the nodes on the arrow, but I have no idea what the benefit is.

-Grant
shorter shanks make more of the arrow bendable, as well as move the FOC forward.

long shanks stiffen arrows as that 1.5" of shank is bonded into the shaft, which means its non flexable.
 

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The lighter arrow will fly flatter for longer.
The heavier arrow will drop sooner but retain more energy on impact.
In a Hunting situation I would pick the lighter arrow in the search for precision.
In a distance competition I would pick the lighter arrow because is should fly flatter for longer, therefore further.
We're measuring distance, not depth,,,right ?.

Hey, I'm a truck driver ok.

John.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
John in NZ. if you and your truck were fully loaded. and doing 50kph. vs you and your truck empty doing 50kph.
which would stop the quickest.

now air is just like a brake. it slows you down the moment your arrow leaves the string. so if a heavy arrow (loaded truck) vs light arrow (unloaded truck) meet the same resistance. (brakeing) then the heavy arrow will not loose speed as fast. so with this analogy. if both arrows are doing the same speed. then the heavy arrow will travel furthest.


the trick to all this works in this principal. if a bullet is shot parralel to the ground. it should hit the ground at the same time as one simply dropped from the same height
gravity does care about the speed. .
 
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