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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been wondering about the reason behind the wood-like texture on traditional arrow shafts. I'm in the impression there must be a practical reason for putting those "imperfections" on the arrows rather than for aesthetics.

Does it help with shooting... like off the shelf? Does it work in conjunction with the hair rest for better guidance? Even if the benefit is minute I still have to know, because I'm sticking with shooting off the shelf.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think aesthetics only.If you use your arrow as a sight they can be easier to see in low light conditions.
Are you talking about the texture or the general color? I don't see any role of texture when it comes to visibility.
 

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IMO just for looks and to justify the higher price they fetch. Also a hold over from the aluminum arrow days when Easton changed camo patterns every year. The Gold Tip blems came with a rough finish which didn’t care for. I used 0000 steel wool and DNA to smooth the shaft.
Now believe it or not there are guys who buy those shafts/arrows cause they worry the “trad police” will jump on them for not being “trad” enough.
I buy shafts with price in mind usually first. If they are “trad finish” so be it. So far the shafts I have gotten from Big Jim that are his version of a trad shaft are holding up just fine. $60 a doz for shafts puts them down there with the blems he used to carry.
 

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Just aesthetics and they are usually heavier without being any stronger.
 

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Now believe it or not there are guys who buy those shafts/arrows cause they worry the "trad police" will jump on them for not being "trad" enough.
I find it amusing that trad police would promote disguising carbon to look like wood. In my opinion, if you want it to look like wood then shoot wood. If you shoot carbon then own it. Putting a wrap on an arrow does not make it trad. In fact, it adds an additional layer of technology to the arrow that did not exist in "trad days".
 

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Marketing.
 
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Yes, wood grain on aluminum and carbon is only for the shooters psyche. What really messes with my psyche is that my carbon arrows are perfect for only one of my bows, but i have wood arrows that fly perfect out of four of my bows, including the one that likes the carbon arrows.
 

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Modern times - fake replacing real- fake wood, fake leather, fake cheese, fake meat, fake reality. Honest new materials are OK, some are great, but I am partial to reality, old or new. It is good to know what is what, where you are and what you are doing. If in doubt look on your phone. Modern times. - lbg
 

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I’m my experience black eagle vintage shafts have such a thick finish they are almost “sticky”...I continue to shoot plain carbon I can enjoy the look of my fletch vs the shaft itself
 

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Just another option we have to consider, which is a good problem to have. I shoot many types and like the wood grain "pattern". For those that hunt and notice the arrow either directly or indirectly, the lighter colored "trad" shafts are helpful in the low light situations you always find yourself shooting. The weight is also generally a little heavier on these models so that is a plus for penetration. I think there's more to it than just looks or marketing, but it's hard to argue that feathers don't look better on wood grain than the basic black shafts.
 

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The coating on the Gold Tip Trad XT shafts that I use is very tough. I am able to scrape it with a knife edge when removing old glue without any damage to the coating. Not quite as tough as anodized hardened aluminum, but close. After shooting a half dozen of these shafts for most of a year, none of them show any wear whatsoever. The coating is also much thicker than paint - thick enough, I suspect, to contribute to the structural properties of the shafts.

To me, the advantages of the wood grain on these shafts are:

1. Toughness - the coating is much tougher than bare carbon.

2. Added weight - I am primarily a hunter, and prefer heavy shafts for a wide variety of reasons. The heaviest shafts in nearly every line of carbon arrows are finished with a wood grain coating.

3. Aesthetics and camouflage - Some of the wood grain finishes are very realistic, and much better looking than any of the bare carbon, flames, blood spatters, skulls, etc. which are on so many carbon arrows these days. Furthermore, most of the wood grain finish colors and patterns reduce visibility in the woods much better than the other things you see on carbon shafts.
 

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My arrows are hermetically sealed in a fake wood grain wrap and have been stored on Funk and Wagnalls' door step since twelve o'clock this afternoon. So says the great archer Carnac the Magnificent.
 

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I shot them.for the gpi weight.

I found that the finish eventually wears behind the point and even chips off.
My biggest issue was when I went to refletching the shafts. The finish scrapes off.
I just went back to aluminum or Easton Aftermaths
 

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You raise an interesting question though. Does a glass smooth arrow fly better or worse than one that is slightly rough. What affects the laminar airflow along the shafts length? After all, it's why golf balls have dimples.
 

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Pretty sure it's to assist me in losing arrows when they bury themselves in pine duff.

They do sound a bit different when drawing compared to uncoated carbon shafts, but that would only matter off a wire rest. I don't notice any difference in sound off a fur patch.
 
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