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Does anyone consider a deflex riser better? More pointable or accurate. I don't see many bowyers building deflex risers. Is is because useable draw length is lost with a deflex riser?
 

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most of the good risers have quite a bit of deflex in them.
Yes more pointable & "forgiving".
See DAS risers & Titan, and the Border risers are pretty popular, quite a bit of DEFLEX in all of these, and scope out most of the current popular Olympic style risers, not straight as a board or reflexed, most are deflexed.
 

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I saw a list on Borders Facebook page where people had measured the deflex on their risers and posted them, quite interesting.
 

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On a deflexed riser you tend to give some of your fastest possible attainable arrow speed. At the same time they tend to be more forgiving of various types of shooter errors.

So much of what we do is a compromise. Give up some of this in order to get a little of that.

So what do we mean by "better"?

I do know that I prefer it as it significantly helps me to reduce spurious bow torque.
 

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When I think of a deflexed riser I'm thinking of the limb pockets behind the grip throat. The more the grip is in front of the limb pockets, the higher the brace height usually is. Reflexed risers will have a shorter brace height and more speed but are more prone to torque issues.

These Quinn risers have a lot of preload and some deflex but Pocket angles change things like preload. More pocket angle actually adds to the deflex in the overall geometry like the one on the left that has had the pockets milled for more angle and will add to the brace and have less preload than the other. Less preload and more angle usually adds to brace height making it a tad more deflexed. It is not just about handle section in deflex, it is about pocket angles too.
 

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Here is some examples of limb pocket geometry and deflex in the handle section. Some are designed to try and eliminate torque but have more preload for performance, Some have both deflexed handles and kicked back pocket angles and will be slower but more forgiving.
 

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This whole family of Sky and Hoyts are very forgiving risers with a good balance of both limb angle and deflex in the handle section. Just use a straight edge to measure the deflex by laying it across the sides of the pockets and measure the distance to the grip throat.
 

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Sam, that PSE isnt as reflexed as its slinky lines suggest.

but here is the crux of the problem.
when a bow comes to closure, there is a BIG spike in the stresses in a bow.
the spike if mostly inline with the string. ie vertically, pulling the limbs together especially the limb pockets.

so if you imagine a line of compression directly between the two limb pockets.
an inline riser, can handle this, as the throat of the grip is where the loadings are centred. So this makes a column load. and all is good.

With a deflexed riser, these energies are outside the throat of the grip.
meaning that the riser has a hell of a stress running through it.

lets take a look at a horse shoe.
if you squeeze the two open ends together then distance will get less as the shoe bends.
there is nothing to support the shape of the shoe, so its going to bend.

If you put a vertical bar in there joing the two open ends, then you will have caught the two open ends, and the stresses into a column loading, so suddenly the shoe is ALOT stronger. infact, you can now cut the rest of the horse shoe away and the two ends still wont join.

We need to put alot of composit in the risers to resist bending.
We also need to do this to accomodate the 5/16" past centre.

now, there is a problem with composits and Timbers.

Timbers can shrink, while the composits wont. Sometimes you get a little step between the two, all wood risers, means that the riser all shrinks together. but you cant get the strength needed in an all wood riser.

So there is a double edge sward to run. we have chosen to run with what we think makes the better bow, while others might choose the better looking bow.

We chose this path when we went all carbon laminates, since you cant get clear carbon, so we cant do clear over vaneer on our limbs, that layup needs glass fiber.
 

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I look at the limbs where they leave the riser and draw a straight line between, then see where the grip is relative to this line. Most I see are about even
Using your definition, most of the risers I see are more of the deflex (right) variety, as opposed to the reflex variety (left).
 

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The one on the left would be very difficult to shoot with recurve limbs. It would also be very hard to shoot because of the low brace height and arrow timing when the string hit dynamic brace and lets the arrow go without torqueing it. Would also be a nightmare to keep string alignment and left right at full draw. Hill style Bows get by with an inline because of limb length, limb thickness and different geometry.
 

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so if you imagine a line of compression directly between the two limb pockets.
an inline riser, can handle this, as the throat of the grip is where the loadings are centred. So this makes a column load. and all is good.

With a deflexed riser, these energies are outside the throat of the grip.
meaning that the riser has a hell of a stress running through it.
Wouldn't a solution be mounting the limbs on the back of the riser (i.e. Black Widow, which is ugly IMO) thus keeping the riser deflexed but putting the stresses more in line with the limbs?
 

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One of the most if not THE MOST popular bows out there for the hunting crowd is the Black Widow. In my opinion this is due almost entirely to the fact that their extreme deflex configuration makes them very easy to shoot accurately. The look is a love it or hate it thing.
 

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we have a 62" MAII BW here. it has 1.5" from the back edge of the limb pockets to the throat of the grip.
the DAS 17 we have is approx 1.36"
a bear A mag riser is 1.2 approx.
a 17" covert hunter is 1.6".

all these are approx measurements...
 
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