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I've been using a deep hook on my string hand when drawing my bow. I've noticed that as I draw, my fingers tended to open up a bit. I've tried to be a bit more aggressive lately in not allowing this to happen. This means a bit more tension in these fingers but the results have been reasonably positive and I seem to have a bit more control on when I release.

For those of you that use a deep hook, does this sound reasonable? Is it the correct way to draw or should I allow the fingers to open a bit???
 

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Mine is the same scenario Odin. A deep hook starting out puts the tips of my string fingers on a line parallel with the palm of my hand but they tend to open slightly as I draw and by the time I actually expand and release the bottom finger ends up just resting on the side of the string....it's just along for the ride. I've even tried a two-finger tab but for some reason can't make it work as well.
 

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I wouldn't fight it. Part of the advantage of a deep hook is to minimize hand tension. Trying to hold firm when the string is trying to open you up a bit sounds counterproductive. As long as the string isn't rolling back into the old "fingertip" position, I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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I shoot three under with a glove, but even when I shot split the string rides in the first joint of my fingers with enough hook to keep it there. If I tried to get the hook "deep" enough so that my fingertips were bent back parallel with my palm it would just roll the string back into the "flat" between the first and second joints or into the second joints entirely. Been there, tried that, didn't work for me, but might work fine with a tab, I just can't shoot one. To each his own.
 

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My method is to 'preload' by drawing back just two or three inches, (enough so I can feel the tension),squeezing the string as hard as I can, then deliberately relaxing 'ten percent' (I don't know what the actual number is, that's just my mental queue.

Now I have firm and total control over the string, and I forget it. Move on to the next step in the shot process.
 

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markliep
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I start off deep as I can then let it set itself - if my backs set up properly & I expand to release there are no Rt flyers - using a deep hook has been really helpful as its saved my string arm from a bit of tendinitis that was developing when I was shooting heavier weights - 2c done - M
 

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The Mad Scientist
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Ok this is a related question. I hook the string at the first finger joint. Since my middle finger is longer (isn't everyones?) it's bent at the second joint, not straight like the other two. It seems to work for me, but is that what others are doing? I shoot a Jenkins 3 under tab.
 

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My deep hook is half way to 2nd joint, with very little tension in my fingers/forearm it's really easy to keep everything relaxed and let the string go with minimal thought or physical effort. It kinda feels like as I rotate elbow around behind my head the fingers are just naturally just unfolding by themselves.

I always imagine a first joint or pad hold akin to hanging on a ledge by the finger tips, so much tension there it's either fatigue or it's forced in allowing those fingers off the string. It works for some people but making something happen seem much more physical/mental effort than just letting something happen.

:sbrug:
 

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Odin, I would offer that while there is nothing inately wrong with asking others about their "hook", a majority or consensus doesn't accomplish anything. What "works" for some.. even a majority does not, of necessity, have to work for you.

There are literally an infinite number of "depth of hook" possibilities to experiment with, as well as "strength of hook' (i.e., how much hold on one resists with in denying the string to roll or fingers to straighten)….. All this is best worked out patiently on the bale, giving adequate time to "investigate-assimilate-and evaluate" as to what is serving you the best.

You might be suprized to find that what proves to be best for you is NOT what "works" for others… even champions! The thing is, that they have found what best works for them and that is often the difference between being a champion and not… All the best!

Tom
 

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You might be suprized to find that what proves to be best for you is NOT what "works" for others… even champions! The thing is, that they have found what best works for them and that is often the difference between being a champion and not… All the best!

Tom
Well said Tom, I've seen all kinds of methods used with great success, it's about what is personally the easiest to repeat not just physically but mentally as well.
 

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I think the string should be hooked between the first and second joint, the same way you would carry a bucket of water. There is significantly less tension in the palm.

To release the shot, simply stop holding it, the same way you would drop the bucket of water.

The string will push your fingers out of the way and they will curl back up.
 

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I think the string should be hooked between the first and second joint, the same way you would carry a bucket of water. There is significantly less tension in the palm.

To release the shot, simply stop holding it, the same way you would drop the bucket of water.

The string will push your fingers out of the way and they will curl back up.
The thing is Jim, that I suspect, from an engineering prospective, the seemingly easiest would be the most consistent…. BUT that's not necessarily the case…. Most respectfully to all, the matter of what is most consistent, most easily repeatable must be determined through reasonably scientific and diligent work on the bale, and then brought to target for comparison. Ahhh, if it were only as simple as physics! :):):)

Tom
 

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Well said Tom, I've seen all kinds of methods used with great success, it's about what is personally the easiest to repeat not just physically but mentally as well.
Thankyou Sir!

I have always believed that the business of being a Champion is very serious business; and requires what most are either unwilling or unable to give! Aside from what it takes to perfect one's performance to as close to humanly perfect as is possible, the matter of mental focus, though for relatively short segments of time BUT ultimately for potentially extending for days, IMO, requires the most demanding discipline and sustained effort!

Being the best is plenty hard work. Watching an effort that results is world class performance is more than testament to the results, it's testament to the individual who was both willing and able to bring the best of himself forth and hold it together better and longer than all others!

Tom
 

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I think the string should be hooked between the first and second joint, the same way you would carry a bucket of water. There is significantly less tension in the palm.

To release the shot, simply stop holding it, the same way you would drop the bucket of water.

The string will push your fingers out of the way and they will curl back up.
That's what I do as well.
I start with the string in the second finger crease and allow it to roll/slide forward onto the second finger pad as I draw.
The string rolling forward also helps to keep the arrow against the bow face or rest for me.
When I release I swing my elbow back an it just lets go.:shooting:
 
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