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Sam, Jim is right. "The paradox" is that nocked on a bow an arrow points in a direction that is different than the one it will take when it is shot. The flexing of the arrow is how the arrow overcomes the paradox, it is not the paradox itself. A release will eliminate the flexing and the arrow will go in the direction it is pointed at full draw - not necessary where the archer wants it to go if the bow is not cut deep past centre.
Static vs. Dynamic.
I know this😜
Funny actually that you assumed I didn't🤪
 

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We knew what you meant, Sam and we knew you knew what you were saying. It's the teminology that folks use to describe it these days. No big deal, but the paradox is not the flexing of the shaft, vertically, horizontally or otherwise. :)

The archers paradox is all about where the "bow" is pointing at "BRACE" compared to where the arrow is in relationship to the mark. It might make it easier by remembering... the bow returns to brace at the shot too. So... the alignment during the shot does not effect the PARADOX. It still exists at BRACE.

The bending of the shaft is not Paradox but it's what overcomes/corrects/defeats the paradox.

Edit: ... and btw... that video you posted has absolutely nothing to do with the archers paradox; it's all about the flexing of the shaft. Video's like that are the reason so many people don't know what the archers paradox actually is.
 
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Here Draven✅

To tune what? If you can’t hit where you want any tune is worthless. The single time the D loop works for “trad” bows is when the archer is instinctive aimer and his brain will compensate for whatever left or right it will require to “hit where he looks”.

PS I think you didn’t read my previous post. The paradox is not that arrow bends but that the arrow hits where you want even if when it is supposed to leave the string it points in another direction - it’s about the two directions not matching. The bending is the reason the paradox can happen. If there is no bending the arrow goes one direction while the archer is expecting the arrow to do something else - go “that” direction. This will be the “archer’s obvious” lesson on D loop.
 

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We knew what you meant, Sam and we knew you knew what you were saying. It's the teminology that folks use to describe it these days. No big deal, but the paradox is not the flexing of the shaft, vertically, horizontally or otherwise. :)

The archers paradox is all about where the "bow" is pointing at "BRACE" compared to where the arrow is in relationship to the mark. It might make it easier by remembering... the bow returns to brace at the shot too. So... the alignment during the shot does not effect the PARADOX. It still exists at BRACE.

The bending of the shaft is not Paradox but it's what overcomes/corrects/defeats the paradox.

Edit: ... and btw... that video you posted has absolutely nothing to do with the archers paradox; it's all about the flexing of the shaft. Video's like that are the reason so many people don't know what the archers paradox actually is.
So Mote it be🙏✅
 

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It's perhaps worth remembering that the flight path of the arrow is a resultant vector of the total resolution of forces generated by the bow. Understand that and you'll understand there is no paradox
 
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To tune what? If you can’t hit where you want any tune is worthless. The single time the D loop works for “trad” bows is when the archer is instinctive aimer and his brain will compensate for whatever left or right it will require to “hit where he looks”.

PS I think you didn’t read my previous post. The paradox is not that arrow bends but that the arrow hits where you want even if when it is supposed to leave the string it points in another direction - it’s about the two directions not matching. The bending is the reason the paradox can happen. If there is no bending the arrow goes one direction while the archer is expecting the arrow to do something else - go “that” direction. This will be the “archer’s obvious” lesson on D loop.
Obviously I should be in the Woods more and the Internet less.
Lesson learned, Bow in hand during Rifle season has always given me more satisfaction.👍✅
Thank you for the reminder.
 

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too many words, guys, more important is to know what it is DOING, and be less concerned of all the different names for it.
this kind of thread with all the "right answers" is why we lost all the guys from 10 years go.
 
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If it is the matter of using ILF or DAS bows, or the addition of bow sights and mechanical or elevated rests and 'plunger' buttons and all other manner of high tech bow equipment to a trad bow...a recurve or longbow, why not just shoot a compound bow and be done with it?

Trad equipment did not originate with metal or carbon risers and limbs and all of that type of thing. They originated as wood bows and to use them any other way is, IMO, simply the delegitimization of the sport and practice. Buy a recurve and learn to shoot it well and if you want a longbow, get one of those and learn to shoot it well. If you want rests, and sights, adjustable this or that and releases then go with compounds or ILS/DAS bows.
 

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Bricksdad, for grins, how far do you go in your TRAD search. Buckskins & fringe?
if you shoot firearms, do you shoot all single shots?
 
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Sigh. What a thread.

As for the original question, if you want to use a mechanical release with a recurve or longbow, have at it. If I were going to do something like that, yes, I'd use a D loop, to prevent as much extra wear and tear on the serving as I could. There's a reason that it's the norm to run a D loop with a release on compounds. From what I've been told, it's easy to re-serve a string or twist up a new one, due to wear and tear. But if a D loop for your release slows down how often you need to do it, it sounds like a good idea to me.

Archer's Paradox. For as long as I've been on here, there have been more than one reference as to what this is. The string, as it rolls off your fingers, it oscillates left and right, on it's way back to brace height. Then it also oscillates forward and back also, when it gets to brace height. This is the thrum you feel in the bow, as you release. (This is why we practice our release so much, so that it effects the arrow flight the least amount possible) It plays a part on how the arrow bends around the bow in the sight window. The arrow bending in the window, is a result of a bunch of things. The resultant oscillation of the string from your release. The resistance of the weight of the arrow to the forward impetus of the string. The resistance of the rest as the arrow slides along it. And there's probably more that I'm not remembering. All of it combined is what turns it into what we commonly call archers paradox. And what is ot really? It's an observation of a couple of Newton's laws. The action that you stuck an arrow on the bow, drew it, and let go. The upright stick (bow) tries to return to rest, when you let go of the string, but is partially restrained, due to the string. The arrow tries to remain at rest, but is acted upon by the force of the string, causing the bending and fishtailing we observe in slow motion. There we go, a full explanation. So, there is something we take for granted. We use the bow to shoot the arrow, and watching basic physics laws in action. Whoda thunk it?

If it is the matter of using ILF or DAS bows, or the addition of bow sights and mechanical or elevated rests and 'plunger' buttons and all other manner of high tech bow equipment to a trad bow...a recurve or longbow, why not just shoot a compound bow and be done with it?

Trad equipment did not originate with metal or carbon risers and limbs and all of that type of thing. They originated as wood bows and to use them any other way is, IMO, simply the delegitimization of the sport and practice. Buy a recurve and learn to shoot it well and if you want a longbow, get one of those and learn to shoot it well. If you want rests, and sights, adjustable this or that and releases then go with compounds or ILS/DAS bows.
Wow. That's a lot. This is not an attack, just a simple response. If you take it an an attack, well, that on you. Metal and carbon risers. Compound bows. These are all technological progress. For better or worse, that's what it is. Actual traditional hunting can go back ad far as using sticks and rocks, and beating the poor animal to death. Not ethical, I'm pretty sure we all agree. So, the advancement to a fire hardened point on a stick, and then throwing it was a big leap in technology. As was the stone point. And eventually the bow and arrow. All technological advances. Over the years, bows improved. Improvements in the manufacturing, in the materials used, and tuning methods. This led to laminated bows, takedown bows, and alternative materials for arrows as well. Traditional archery, and the practice of it, is different for everyone, whether it's an all wood 1 piece bow, a wood and fiberglass bow, the addition of carbon and or aluminum, a chewstrap, etc.
 

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I did not mean to get people talking about how an arrow gets around a bow, only that I was surprised to see on the slow motion videos that i saw no improvement in arrow flight. In my attempts to get even an unofficial 300 PAA I tried everything. My highest scores were with the Wison strap tab. To use the strap tab for my 42 pound Widow hunting 66" recurve, I had to beef up the the strap to give my thumb something more to grab. remember the red Hotshot release, it was one of the first mechanicals that were popular. I tried one once, but with someone else's bow. The fellow had one set up palm down and one set up for palm to the face. I shot his bow with fingers, just to check where his sights were set,(so I would not hit the wall), then went to the release. I anchored put the sight off to where i thought it should be and released, my fingers. The release bounced off of the bow and stuck in the ceiling tile for a bit, then fell to the floor. The last one I bought has the wrist strap, still have it somewhere. Other than the sound, I can see that if one had to use one, it could definitely be done, but in my case, I would find it cumbersome in the field and a lot slower for going to that second arrow, when hunting rabbits and pheasants the second arrow is a real thing, and I did not see any great accuracy advantages.
 

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One of my shooting companions shoots with a Gemini ring or Roman ring as he sometimes calls it. Using various forms of release mechanisms has been common practice throughout history and around the world.

So in reply to the original question ... Yeah if it works for you "when in Rome"
 

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... Using various forms of release mechanisms has been common practice throughout history and around the world...

Those rascals! Didn't they realize they were deligitimizing the sport?

:mad:
 
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