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No.
 

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Of course it is--if you "need" to. You can use a release on any bow, compound, recurve or longbow. I don't know why you'd need a string loop though when you could just hook it to the string.
 

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You can use a D loop and release on a Trad bow and it can make good sense when using heavy draw weights. When my hands were really bad I tried a release and although it worked well it just didn’t feel right (mentally) on a traditional bow. I just layed off and let my fingers heal up.
 

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Only if your fingers are missing or don't work very well. I suspect that using a release with a longbow will come with a greater tuning challenge than it would with some other bow that has a shelf cut well past center. I see that this is your first post so I'll just assume that you might need to build your knowledge base. There isn't much information out there on what to do and how to tune trad bows when using a release. I've looked into it some because my hands are getting pretty arthritic. Not having the string roll off the fingers to begin the shot changes how the arrow bends while leaving the bow. If your string fingers are intact, just learn archery the normal way and you will have lots of written and video resources to help you along.
 

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I had tried it when i had hand issues. It felt awkward at first and while I didn't stick with it long term, I have no doubt that had I, it would have worked out fine had my hand not healed. I can tell you that it changes alot. You will most likely need a stiffer arrow as there is no roll off the fingers on the release. Also, you would be best served by a riser that is cut more like a compound IMO. Something like a Martin Jaguar for instance.
 

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I injured my hand several years ago with hunting season coming up. I got a wrist strap release and gave it a whirl. I was shooting a Bear B magnesium riser (cut out from center) and hooked the string with about a 2" crawl. That gave me the same look as shooting with fingers. It tuned easily and was absolutely, DEADLY POISON. :)
 

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May have tuning issues depending on what bow you go with. Purists are gonna cringe but it's your gear, your shot. When I first started I sucked really bad. But I threw a sight on my Sage and started hitting close to or where I was aiming. Taught me I could do it, just needed to work more at it. It lasted a couple weeks and came off. Great training aid, more mental confidence than anything but had I not, I may not have stuck with single-strings and gone back to compounds. So whatever helps in your journey, I say go for it.
 

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My late father used a d loop and a wrist style release with his recurve, when his hands would not allow finger shooting any longer. The bow had a large sight window, had a center cut riser and was was shot off a Bear weather rest. I would think that a longbow with a small sight window and shallow cut riser shot off the shelf would not allow you to shoot accurately with a wrist style release. Expect your tune to change... nock point, arrow spine and tip weight.
 

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I've tried it because of hand issues and general curiosity. The arrow was against the nock and the release against the arrow and son of a gone.... it worked well. Shot quite high but pretty much right down the middle. I did this on a Sage. - C
 

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I had a film student video my shooting a few years back with a high end camera. It was a big assignment for the end of her senior year, to film sports or whatever, in ways that would be educational and revealing. She wanted a variety of shots, plus slow motion close ups of the mechanics. I shot my longbows and target recurves with fingers, Wilson strap tab and a mechanical caliper release. With the outside of center style longbows, the archers paradox was no different than with fingers. The same was true for the targets bows that were set outside of center with the Berger button, but I was surprised to see how hard a Berger button works when an arrow presses against it. The horizontal paradox is caused by the string driving at the center of the bow and the arrow resisting motion while it is pointed away from the center of the bow. Take a fishing rod or anything that bends easy, put the end left of a definite mark and then push directly at that definite mark. The bendable rod will bend to the right, that is resisting forward motion, an arrow does the same. It first bends into the bow and then reacts to that bend and bends around the bow, in my case, the arrow stayed i contact to the bow longer than I expected.
Oh, about the original question, mechanical releases produce an audible clink when shot with longbows. They require a completely different aim, you may have a shorter draw length, but if it works for you, I say give it try.
 

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Until I saw the slow motion videos of my own arrows, I never gave it much thought. If the arrows were stable and heading towards where I pointed them by 10 or 12 yards, I figured it was could enough. Now that I am shooting bows that are 3/8" outside of center, I am back at that same place, I figure that I do not shoot the bow, I shoot the arrow and once the 'S' curve is completed if the arrow is stable and going where I pointed it, I am good to go. I do understand that carbon arrows have their own behaviors and specifics coming out of more center shot bows. What I see more often is hunters getting mentally tangled up when attempting game shots. Hard aim versus instinctive and shot form and timing. Something that may be very hard to explain or teach. Everyone has different experiences, i grew up a bunny and bird hunter with my bows, i still prefer bunny and bird hunting to sitting in tree stands, which I do not do. never shot a deer from a tree, who knows maybe I would like it. NA, I am staying on the ground and sneaking around. For myself, things happen too fast to think about things more than focusing on the spot and having confidence in myself and my arrows.
 

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I agree with Jim Castro. How anal and accurate do you want to shoot, your ability and how much time and effort are you prepared to invest. How much research are you prepared to put in. Most archers have a limit. Many archers get on these web sites ask for answers but are not prepared to do the research. Beginners I understand because they don't know better.. How many times have archers asked questions and then said I have worked it out. A damn waste of our time they are. Having said this I have vented somewhat. I am amazed at how much tolerance you guys on here have for some of these archers. It is what it is and I commend you experienced guys for continually answering. I have said my peace.. thanks all
 

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little john59, When someone is asking questions you never know who they are and where they are at on their traditional journey or how they will or will not use the information you are offering. On here and other forums I offer information that I may have on topics, what they do with it is up to them. I take comfort in that I may have helped someone like others have helped me.
 

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Sam, Jim is right. "The paradox" is that nocked on a bow an arrow points in a direction that is different than the one it will take when it is shot. The flexing of the arrow is how the arrow overcomes the paradox, it is not the paradox itself. A release will eliminate the flexing and the arrow will go in the direction it is pointed at full draw - not necessary where the archer wants it to go if the bow is not cut deep past centre.
 
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