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Have a question as to correct draw length one should have...

I’ve been shooting with a draw length and using 29 inch arrows
on a 35# at 28 inches (60”) recurve for years. I shoot right handed. Just recently someone in the archery industry measured me and stated I have a 26.5” draw and should be shooting 27 inch arrows.

I did acquire some 27 inch arrows from one of my friends and have experienced shooting them. I really don’t notice the difference except for the fact that I don’t seem to have the stress on my right elbow area (I sense a tennis elbow soreness at times).
I also realize that at 27 inches my bow of 35# is not reaching it’s potential of power marked at 28 inch draw.

My question is this.... Should I just stay with the 29 inch arrow as I’ve shot during the last 10 years, its something I’m use to...or should I concentrate on a 27 inch arrow...find a bow that then produces 35/40 # at 27 inches and go along with what my draw measurement really is? All accordingly to archery shop findings recently.
 

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I shoot arrows longer than my draw for a reason. That is to close the gap on 3D shooting. There is really no "should" be shooting length arrow in reality. As long as you have tuned the arrow well you can shoot any length arrow that is long enough to cover your actual draw.

There are very good reason for shooting longer arrow and good reason for shooting arrows just long enough to get through the clicker.
 

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Two issues:
First, most measurements of draw length are flat wrong. The best way is to wait until you are warmed up and shooting well. Then ask a friend to watch your arrow tip for several good shots and see how much of it extends forward from your riser. If it extends well forward have him note how much of the shaft shows from the riser to the back of the point. Measure from his observation to the groove in the nock.

Then measure your bow from the riser where he sighted off it, horizontally to the depth of the low point on your grip. The industry standard is an inch and three quarters. If your bow is less deep, add the difference to your measurement.

Second, the idea that your arrow should match your draw length might make a little sense if you are shooting with a bow sight, but not much. For shooting barebow, where the arrow is a key part of our sight picture, whether consciously or not, having an arrow that short is flat wrong also. Two inches or more longer is better to get it out to where your eye can see it.

My advice is: don't bother. Shoot what you are used to, with the sight picture your eye has used for thousands of shots. - lbg
 

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Interesting thread redarrow / longbowguy...

Just to add another dimension to this discussion, in my day job I use a lot of anthropometric data related to the size of the human body. Looking at the data relating to the length of the human arm, (measured from the shoulder Acromion to the centre of a rod gripped vertcally in the hand) a 95%ile of 709.92mm works out to 27.949 inches. Seeing as a large proportion of archers default to a draw length of around 28 inches, could this be a good way of establishing accurate draw length, based on your own personal anatomical dimensions?

Be interested to hear your thoughts
 

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I love how people give out poor information

Like you should be shooting 27 inch arrows

As long as the arrow is longer than your draw length you are fine

Some like long arrows it adds in their aiming method

So e cut to tune and than the arrow ends up at a certain length etc but in no way is the guy that offered you info even remotely correct
 

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Captbill
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I got similar advise years ago and cut down my arrows. It did not work out so well for me either. Even after bare shafting I just couldn't my groups down. I went back to a bit longer arrow. Also keep in mind your draw length will change with different styles of grips and certain arrow material combinations may not work"short."
 

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Cutting down your arrows because they look to long is just wrong! Especially on a recurve as it affects the spine of the arrow dramatically. Giving you poor arrow flight and no consistence in your groups

Mike
 

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Interesting thread redarrow / longbowguy...

Just to add another dimension to this discussion, in my day job I use a lot of anthropometric data related to the size of the human body. Looking at the data relating to the length of the human arm, (measured from the shoulder Acromion to the centre of a rod gripped vertcally in the hand) a 95%ile of 709.92mm works out to 27.949 inches. Seeing as a large proportion of archers default to a draw length of around 28 inches, could this be a good way of establishing accurate draw length, based on your own personal anatomical dimensions?

Be interested to hear your thoughts
My coach measured me in this manner. He had me put my had against the corner of a door jam like I was holding the grip and measured to my anchor points. After converting to AMO standard, I think it came out a little shorter than what I was showing with the bow. Some of that difference could be low wrist grip on the door jam versus high wrist grip on the bow. Also, I think the shoulder girdle is expanded at full draw. Not sure how it is in your data.
 

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I have a 26 1/2 inch draw. My arrows are 28 inches long for two reasons that have nothing to do with true draw length
1. I use the point of my arrow for gap shooting. 28 inches gets me point on 21-23 yds. For where I hunt 95 percent of my shots are 20 and under.
2. It gets the broadhead past my hand even if I overdraw it some. Dont particularly like razor sharp objects on top of my hand at full draw
 

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Philosophically speaking, numbers are the bane of archery.

Left alone and naked in a storage room of unlabeled and unlimited archery equipment, an archer of some studied technique would select a bow for their purpose that they could draw and shoot with comfortable, repeated accuracy, and then select arrows to accommodate their shot.

After dressing back into their clothing and taking their selections to the clerk for payment, they would hurry to the range in excitement to eagerly play with their new toys, and return home aglow with exhilaration.

Later that night, as they performed some tedious, though necessary, record-keeping choirs at their desk (perhaps after perusing their favorite archery forums), they would enter the financial transactions of the day into their ledger. Before filing the bow and arrow invoice into their desk drawer, would only then take casual note of the draw weight and arrow specifications of that day's successful and rewarding purchase.

That singular, fleeting glance as the invoice made its journey from desktop to drawer would illicit but a casual and contemplative sotto voce "hmm", and ne'er be given a second thought.

Reality is from what numbers and specifications are derived. One must mate their equipment efficiently to their real biology with a mental detachment from mathematical labeling.

Numerical specs have their vital purposes, but they must follow and serve biology, rather than be forced upon it with the expectation that the biology will somehow conform to them.
 

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Thin Man,

I think one of the issues is a preconceived notion regarding what number is right or necessary. When I started archery, I had a draw weight number in my head. Over time, I have selected the bow that fits me best from that dark closet you describe. My number is based upon my body, my form, and my goals. I am happy with my number. Anyway, got to go. The Sleep Number Bed store opens in less than 30 minutes.
 

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Hank,

Sleep Number Bed, eh?

That brings up an interesting parallel to my comments. A "Draw Number" bow would allow the archer to select their optimum draw number. Couple this with a "Spine Number" arrow to complete the archery boudoir.

Here are the "Comfort Tips" from the Sleep Number website: http://www.sleepnumber.com/customer-service/sleep-tips

Ring any archery bells?

You really can't have a preconceived notion with this bed. Your biology makes the final decision (unless you want to guess in advance, absent experience, that a sleep number of 100 is somehow will present a night of comfortable sleep more so than a sleep number of 20).

In which case, you can save lots of money by sleeping on the floor.

Tossing and turning? No biggie ... you'll work up to it soon enough!
 

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I shoot my arrows at my exact draw length + 1 inch.
This does give me a smaller ranges of spines I can work with than if I bought heavier spines and left them full length.
But I prefer a softer spine, a lighter point weight and an over all lighter arrow than is more common today.
So I tune and cut everything close to achieve that.
I do also poke the stick at my mates with 6 inches sticking out the front of their bows.
It's just wrong,like walkin' about with your fly open.

Ok get ya' boots on.
John,,,LOL.
 

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When shooting gap I like as much length as I can get without losing too much speed (above 180 is fine), when stringwalking generally they are cut 1" in front of the button.

-Grant
 
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