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I hear a lot of archers say they just want to shoot their bow and have fun, which I have no problem with. I love to compete with my archery equipment. There are way too many times when I go to competitions knowing I'm not up to par due to lack of practice, lack of talent,lol, equipment not tuned together, etc. It really doesn't matter to me because I just like to get out and fling arrows against other competitors. Losing isn't easy to people who are competitive, but it's part of the cycle, and, ultimately, makes you appreciate the wins all that much more. I see a disturbing pattern among a lot of the top and former top shooters of not showing up to competitions because they aren't " tuned to the moon", shooting lights out. I personally feel that this is one of the major reasons so many of the top archers in the nonsight classes fail to be able to match their practice scores in competitions. Getting beat, paying your dues, seeking out top archers at tournaments and signing up on their targets, are all ways to help improve you own game down the line. Three months after I first got into archery, I would go to every tournament I could and sign up on the target with our state champion. I was just brash enough to think I could beat him right off the bat. Of course, I couldn't, but those experiences and defeats paid dividends later in life. Losing an archery tournament doesn't make you any less a man or woman, but It can prepare you for great things later in your archery career.
 

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Ben, if losing an archery tournament did make one less of a man, I would have very little man left in me.;)

An intelligent person learns something in winning and losing.
 

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Spearhead
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Ben if I could put more than one thanks to your post I would put a whole bunch of thanks.
Very well put.
If you start at the top where do you have to go?

Yes I love to compete in shoots but what I enjoy most of all is shooting my bow.
I will quit the day I show up to win and only to win.

Just like hunting if the thril of the stalk/hunt is gone it will be over.

Just like martial arts, people reach a level and quit they reached their personal goal, once a goal is reached you go for another not quit.

Chad
 

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I hear a lot of archers say they just want to shoot their bow and have fun, which I have no problem with. I love to compete with my archery equipment. There are way too many times when I go to competitions knowing I'm not up to par due to lack of practice, lack of talent,lol, equipment not tuned together, etc. It really doesn't matter to me because I just like to get out and fling arrows against other competitors. Losing isn't easy to people who are competitive, but it's part of the cycle, and, ultimately, makes you appreciate the wins all that much more. I see a disturbing pattern among a lot of the top and former top shooters of not showing up to competitions because they aren't " tuned to the moon", shooting lights out. I personally feel that this is one of the major reasons so many of the top archers in the nonsight classes fail to be able to match their practice scores in competitions. Getting beat, paying your dues, seeking out top archers at tournaments and signing up on their targets, are all ways to help improve you own game down the line. Three months after I first got into archery, I would go to every tournament I could and sign up on the target with our state champion. I was just brash enough to think I could beat him right off the bat. Of course, I couldn't, but those experiences and defeats paid dividends later in life. Losing an archery tournament doesn't make you any less a man or woman, but It can prepare you for great things later in your archery career.
Good post. Whether you realize it or not, I think your last sentence, specifically the last two words, might be more insightful than you think.

"archery career"

I don't have an "archery career." I have an archery hobby. I have a huge passion for that hobby, but I don't, in any way, shape, or form, want it to be anything resembling a career. That would ruin it for me. It's all in how you look at it.
 

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Good post. Whether you realize it or not, I think your last sentence, specifically the last two words, might be more insightful than you think.

"archery career"

I don't have an "archery career." I have an archery hobby. I have a huge passion for that hobby, but I don't, in any way, shape, or form, want it to be anything resembling a career. That would ruin it for me. It's all in how you look at it.
Strictly semantics, Sylvan. Usually I say archery Journey but it's been a day or two since my last post and I forgot the phrase.lol
 

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There isn't anything more inspirational/humbling than a good old fashioned arse whipping too!

And competition can be so exciting that folks even shoot the wrong target. Correct me if I'm wrong here. :)
LOL. Denny, it was early in the year and I didn't want all the young guys to get discouraged before the outdoor stuff began.:pin:
 

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Chad,

I know exactly what you mean - that is why I am on my fourth wife! Just kidding honey!!!!

Alan

If you start at the top where do you have to go?

Yes I love to compete in shoots but what I enjoy most of all is shooting my bow.
I will quit the day I show up to win and only to win.

Just like hunting if the thril of the stalk/hunt is gone it will be over.

Just like martial arts, people reach a level and quit they reached their personal goal, once a goal is reached you go for another not quit.
 

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Ben, great post and I'm sure I hold the record on how many times a man can get beat...and yes it sure does make the victories that much sweeter.

It's not how you win it's how you lose that shows character.


Great post.


Dewayne
 
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itbeso I love the thread and all of the answers, it's one of my personal demons too. I love to shoot but I have to compete. When I started my "journey" I looked for the top scores in our 3D coalition, they all belong to one man, and that became my goal. It was not a goal set out of disrespect, just the opposite, he's actually an awesome archer and a great guy. I admire his abilities but I felt the need for a goal, something to strive for. Didn't matter that I'd been shooting for months and he'd been shooting for many years....my goal was to win tournaments he competed in and that gave me the drive to shoot one more group, spend one more session in front of the bale. I won one tournament on him last season but by and large he's still the top dog in my book and at my first state championship last year I came in second to his first. My best score is one point shy of his best score....so the way I look at it I still have work to do and I'll keep spending that extra time on the range. This year is my year.
 

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Mammoth Hunter
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I'll never forget my first league Vegas round. I sidled up to the line with my cheap longbow and cheaper aluminum arrows and shot a blistering 47 total score. I figure I'd probably still be there if I weren't so competitive. It's too easy when something is a fun hobby to remember the good shots, forget the bad ones, and convince yourself that you're better than you are. Every major change I've made to my form, aiming methodology, etc., has come from showing up to a competition and learning I wasn't as good as I thought I was - and I guess, most importantly, not as good as I wanted to be.
 

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Shooting the IBO shoots last year was the best move I made in my training plan. I struggled all year but walked away with a lesson learned from each shoot, especially Bedford! I knew my skills were not were they needed to be and all the more reason to jump in and start gaining the experience and learning from the top shooters. On top of that, I met some great people and had a lot of fun. Yes, getting beat by a large margin can be fun, it's all about the attitude and the pay off in the end.
 

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When Dewayne was kicking all our buts in Cloverdale someone said "he's just as nice a guy when he gets his but kicked " or something along those lines.

I thought that was one heck of a complement.
 
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