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Ok guys I need some ideas on what I can do to make smaller gaps with the bow I am currently shooting. My gap at 20 yards is over 24 inches. To be honest its so large I don't even consider it when I shoot at less than 30 yards but just feel the shot. I do ok like this but know I shoot my best and most consistent with tighter gaps. Here's the things I know can make for smaller gaps:

* longer arrow - I'm already shooting full length arrows(32")
* raise your anchor - it works but I prefer corner of the mouth with second
finger to get the best pull/back tension/etc...
* heavier arrow - I don't want to do that because I like to shoot long
range and need a flat shooting arrow
* raise nock point - It's already high

Is there anything else I can try to close my gaps?

thanks
 

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What do you call a "high" nock?
Make sure your not healing the bow.
Make sure your head is tilted into the shot, not up. Use your nose as another anchor and touch it to the shaft or fletching. This might cause your head to tilt forward slightly, bringing your eye closer to the arrow = smaller gaps.
Some will tell you to gap at the bow, but its hard to see that gap for me.
If the distance at anchor from the nock to your eye is large, you are going to have a large gap. While it might not be comfortable, you may have to decide what is more important to you(smaller gap, or comfy anchor). For me personally, I no longer will accept a poor release from a super high anchor, so I deal with the gaps.
 

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The fastest, no need to change or buy stuff, is simply to shoot with a 3under hook and experiment with how high you can/want to raise your anchor point... Heck you can have a 10yd point on if you choose.

Tom
 

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Use gap at arrow tip not at target. My largest gap is 1" with my outdoor setup. Not sure how big that would be at the target, but my point on is 40 yards (currently), and I have a 1" gap at 15 yards. I look at the 1" between the tip of my arrow and the X ring. Very similar to stacking shafts... Every 5 yards is 1/4 approx. There is a great thread on this system by Gary Mccain on here and AT. I have found switching to this system has increased my scores dramatically, and also my hunting confidence.
 

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rsarns is spot on, it is SO much easier for me to gap at the bow than at the spot. Stringwalking? I wish that were an option, at 3D ranges I think I could clean up, it's a deadly accurate system. Unfortunately our rules say that "one finger must touch the nock at all times".
 

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rsarns is spot on, it is SO much easier for me to gap at the bow than at the spot. Stringwalking? I wish that were an option, at 3D ranges I think I could clean up, it's a deadly accurate system. Unfortunately our rules say that "one finger must touch the nock at all times".
If you hook with your middle two fingers and keep your index free you can string-walk and keep your finger touching the nock - play with it.

;-) LOL
 

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If you hook with your middle two fingers and keep your index free you can string-walk and keep your finger touching the nock - play with it.

;-) LOL
Unfortunately most rules state you have to have all fingers touching each other....The archer shall touch the arrow when nocked and drawing the arrow with the index finger against the nock. Finger position may not be changed during competition.
 

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Can someone explain this? Never considered that there was another way. My gap at 10 yds is shoot 12 inches low. My gap at 15 is shoot ten inches low ...and so on. Maybe that is actually "pic a spot" ?????
It means that instead of picking a spot or gap at the target, you are paying attention to the gap between the arrow tip and the x from the arrows perspective. For example, if at 20 yards you are gapping a distance of 12" at the target, the same gap could be only 1" from the arrow tip to the x.

Hope this makes sense.
 

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It sounds like you have your equipment set correctly for small gaps. Full length arrows, relatively high nock, etc.

Couple other things you might try if you haven't already...

Use two nock locators, one above and one below. If you just use one above the nock can slide down at release and this can give you a little hop and increase your PO.

If you shoot off the shelf use a softer material for the rest. I always end up with a longer point on when I use hard leather or something like it off the shelf. Likely due to the material not having any give.

If you don't already, try tilting your head forward until the string touches your brow. Depending on your head angle this may shave off a decent amount from your gaps.

You could try heavier arrows but for unmarked shooting I don't really like this option. I want flat and fast.

But, the biggest and most effective, is finding an anchor that allows you to tighten up the gaps. For example, if I anchor with my index on my upper tooth I have a PO of about 40 yards and midrange gaps around 18" at the target. If I anchor with the index on top of my tooth at the corner of my nose I cut that to a 30 yard PO and my gaps shrink by 2/3. I think my largest hold under is app. 6-7". That's with an arrow moving along at 200ish fps.

If an anchor change just isn't an option look into the gap at bow methods. Either the short gap like others have described or actually using riser features to set your gap.

Chris
 

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That's a great visual...but there are a couple of ways to find that gap. I've set a horizontal line on my bale press and shot point on it at different yardages, measuring and marking the point of impact at each distance. Then I'll go back and set a spot on both my point of aim(the horizontal line) and the point of impact. Then it's a matter of drawing, anchoring, coming point on to the lower target, and seeing the gap.

The best way I've found to get a solid, accurate measurement is a modification of Bob Gordon's method of using a temporary sight. Duct tape a toothpick on the front of the riser, sight it in for each yardage just like you would a wheel bow, and once sighted in, take the measurement between the arrow and the sight.

My point on with my Black Bear setup is ~ 46-47 yards. My gap from 15 to 20, the average of all our targets, is about an inch. Our max 3D yardage is 25. My arrow is still rising slightly between 20 and 25, so on what I feel is a max yardage target I add a hair or two to that gap and I'm dead on.
 

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24" gap at 20 is what I have and feel that it's no problem. I just so happens that my arrows are 24" from the BOP to the front of the wrap. So I look at the target, imagine that arrow standing up and gap from there. I have also taken that arrow and layed it against quite a few 3D targets to see what it looks like.
My gaps are 5yds 8", 10 yds. 16", 15yds 24", 20 yds. 24", 25 yds. 20", 30 yds. 12", 35 yds. point on. Works pretty slick at 3d ranges - most shots are about the same one arrow gap. Gapping at the bow has never worked for me.
 

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I have a hard time trying to aim 12 inches low. After reading the thread my mind starts wondering because of the "focus" points mentioned. I realize that instead of picking a spot 12 inches low and aiming at it, I'm aiming 12 inches low, if that makes sense. In other words, I have a varied focus of the intended point of impact and my arrow all the while factoring in what I think is 12 inches. I should pick a spot 12 inches low and aim at it as if I intended to hit that spot. Yep, that has been my problem. I can fix it now that I realize it
 

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That's a great visual...but there are a couple of ways to find that gap. I've set a horizontal line on my bale press and shot point on it at different yardages, measuring and marking the point of impact at each distance. Then I'll go back and set a spot on both my point of aim(the horizontal line) and the point of impact. Then it's a matter of drawing, anchoring, coming point on to the lower target, and seeing the gap.

The best way I've found to get a solid, accurate measurement is a modification of Bob Gordon's method of using a temporary sight. Duct tape a toothpick on the front of the riser, sight it in for each yardage just like you would a wheel bow, and once sighted in, take the measurement between the arrow and the sight.

My point on with my Black Bear setup is ~ 46-47 yards. My gap from 15 to 20, the average of all our targets, is about an inch. Our max 3D yardage is 25. My arrow is still rising slightly between 20 and 25, so on what I feel is a max yardage target I add a hair or two to that gap and I'm dead on.
I should try this. I have slowed my arrow so much trying to get my point on closer. Down to 152 FPS. It really falls out past 30.
 
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