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As I've posted before I had not shot my recurves with any regularity in 20 years. Last October I picked up my bow and started shooting almost every day since. My problem is that I had several dozen mis-matched aluminum and cedar arrows to begin with. When I last had purchased arrows only compound bows shot with release used those skinny little carbon arrows.
Well much to my surprize when I started shopping arrows the cost of cedar (and getting them in quality) was not really available to me. I couldn't find aluminum anywhere except online either. I was never a big fan of aluminum because they bent so easily.
So I purchased my first set of carbon arrows: Gold tip traditionals 3555 since I was shooting 40 to 45 lb bows seemed like a good fit. I put 125 grain points on them and started shooting. Out of my 45lb 56" Indian recurve I got good flight and was happy with the way they were hitting the target. I then picked up my first 40# recurve and no matter how I moved my nock point on the string I got porpoising down range.

I then ordered Beman bowhunter carbons 30" and no matter what field tip I put on it, nock point setting I got even more porpoising. I tried 90, 125, and 145 grain tips.

Well today on another post about grains per inch I noticed that I am shooting a very heavy arrow per inch 14.43, but still not much more than 432 grains per arrow. I grabbed a couple of the Gold tips and put the 145 grain field point went out and shot with my 40# and got my first consistent flight since I started using carbons.

So after all that long winded talk, how in blue blazes do you get the right information on those carbons to make a selection of what you need? I mean for cedar it's just your spine and diameter, and aluminum even easier first number diameter, second wall thickness then look at an easton chart to match the proper arrow to your weight and draw length.
 

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j-san = Jason
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Most carbon arrows have a spine rating at even intervals: .600, .500, .400, etc. etc. Some manufacturers use the spine rating as the naming of the shaft (eg: Ultralight 600), while others may use a draw weight range as part of the name (eg: GT Hunter 3555). The websites of the manufacturers often have recommended spine charts posted, and are often fairly close to what you need.

Do you have a top and bottom nock locator on your string? Have you bareshaft tuned your bow and arrows?
 

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I always use Stu's Calculator. Just downloaded a new one today that I found on the 2nd page of the leatherwall.

j-san has a very important statement - "Most carbon arrows have a spine rating at even intervals: .600, .500, .400, etc. etc. Some manufacturers use the spine rating as the naming of the shaft (eg: Ultralight 600), while others may use a draw weight range as part of the name (eg: GT Hunter 3555)." That .600, .500 really means something. It's deflection. Hence Ultralight 600 means something!!!! GT Hunter 3555 means NOTHING and I will not patronize any manufacturer that uses it. 0.600, .500, ect is universal and 3555 is GT. The reason they use it is so it's harder for archers to switch to another brand of arrow without trying to find the deflection.

Bowmania
 

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I'd try the calculator on the 3Rivers site...http://www.3riversarchery.com/SpineCalculator.asp?pass=2. Stu's will probably give you a similar result but I don't have a link handy. Either should get you close, and if you are just coming back close is probably good enough.

Eventually you will want to tune your arrows, this is a good link to one of the proven processes...http://www.acsbows.com/bowtuning.html Keep in mind that bare-shaft tuning can be frustrating if your form isn't relatively consistent.
 

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Bart Harmeling
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Here's the link to Stu's newest version. It does require Excel 2007 or higher and only works with the Windows versions. The calculator on the 3River site is Stu's online version which works in your browser.
 

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I always use Stu's Calculator. Just downloaded a new one today that I found on the 2nd page of the leatherwall.

j-san has a very important statement - "Most carbon arrows have a spine rating at even intervals: .600, .500, .400, etc. etc. Some manufacturers use the spine rating as the naming of the shaft (eg: Ultralight 600), while others may use a draw weight range as part of the name (eg: GT Hunter 3555)." That .600, .500 really means something. It's deflection. Hence Ultralight 600 means something!!!! GT Hunter 3555 means NOTHING and I will not patronize any manufacturer that uses it. 0.600, .500, ect is universal and 3555 is GT. The reason they use it is so it's harder for archers to switch to another brand of arrow without trying to find the deflection.

Bowmania
Nice Myth Bow,the deflections are listed on GT's web site.
 

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The reason they use it is so it's harder for archers to switch to another brand of arrow without trying to find the deflection.
The reason they use it is because most archers (make that people who shoot arrows) don't know what spine is.

I'm not particularly defending GT, but they were the first cross weave carbon shaft and their numbering system is no worse and better than some.

Read this... http://www.huntersfriend.com/carbon_arrows/hunting_arrows_spine_chart_by_deflection.htm

After you've absorbed all that, you also need to know that all mfgs do not use the same method of determining the spine numbers they advertise. It's a PITA which isn't likely to change. As individuals we're pretty much stuck with, research as best you can then experiment.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all of the information, I'll do more research in the future before purchasing my shafts.
 

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Try a half dozen CT Cheetahs from Tradtech/Lancaster, in .650 spine. Leave them long until you are -sure- they're too soft.

Carbons are not like the other children ;-)
 
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j-san = Jason
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One bit of info you may find helpful in tuning arrows - you can use the Bohning Cool Flex heat-reversible insert adhesive on your carbon arrows. It really helps when you can remove and reglue your inserts to determine your final desired length.
 
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