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Victim of Geography
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I did some work for the local archery club and was given 9 locally produced broadheads.

Unlike Americans we are not very patriotic when it comes to local products. I was wondering how to test these. From what I have read the first thing I need to do is get rid of the pointed head and make it into more of a chisel (tanto?) point. Then I assume shoot them into some kind of shutter board? Bone would be better I would think but have none lying around.

I realize I would need to tune them and spin them to see if they run true first.

Any ideas would be welcome. The only other broadheads I have are Zwickeys, but they already seem to have good reviews.
 

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I'm not sure I'd tanto that point??? It looks pretty strong to me. I say this and do tanto the STOS broadheads that I shoot. I think I'd have to play with the head a little before making a final decision.

Bowmania
 

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Bart Harmeling
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A few years ago I tried to come up with a target for testing. I wanted to have something that demonstrated the effectiveness of really sharp BH's compared to ones that were dull. The problem is getting something that has similar properties to bone and tissue found in big game animals. What I came up with was Knox gelatin. I'd prepare the gelatin per instructions then pour it into a ziplock bag that also contained polyester fibers from pillow stuffing. I included the polyester because muscle tissue is full of sinew and connecting fibers. For ribs I split green bamboo lengthwise. The bags of gelatin went into a box with the ribs placed along the front and back. For my purpose it worked well. Arrows with dull BH's would would barely penetrate the box, while arrows with very sharp BH's would pass through and travel a considerable distance beyond.

Problems include the fact that gelatin needs to stay cool, so your time window for shooting may be limited depending on the outside temp. There is still a degree of inconsistency as the arrows never strike the ribs in exactly the same way.

But I think it is better that using foam, or plywood because this material places friction on the shaft of the arrow after the BH passes through. I'll try to include some pics.
 

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Victim of Geography
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have always used three blade broadheads.

Do you plan on mounting the two blades on a horizontal or vertical plane??
Horizontal.

I believe that's the way to minimize planing, seem to remember reading it somewhere. Maybe it is also better for me as I am gapping.
 

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Those are nice looking broadheads, the only tests I'd run on them is to make sure they are sharp and hit with my field points out to 25-30 yards.

After those grueling appraisals I'd test them on game...;)
 

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Premium Member
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Yes sir, Jason got it. it is the profile of the Deadhead. The deadhead had ALOT of fans and many hunted with it very successfully. Keep in mind that was in the days that most I of the hunters I hunted with were pulling 65# on their hunting bows. It flew and drove the dead head well. Had a nice heavy shaft and arrow to keep things on line.

It might be hard to drive the head with the light shafts we are shooting today. I really find that Howard Hills rule of three to one is a very good rule even today.
 

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Yes, three inches long for one inch wide. Excellent penetration and if a three blade like the woodsman. Cuts a hole on nearside and off side that leaves blood trail that my wives' Yorkshire Terrie can follow.

That is if Texas feral pigs are any worthy test medium. :)

The three to one do especially well in the lighter draw fast arrow hunting rigs. Imo
 

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Victim of Geography
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks fellows.

These are 2" long by 1 1/8" so sadly they don't conform.

I will be using them for Warthog in September hopefully so I'm sure your Texas hogs are a good test medium.
 

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Victim of Geography
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have just remembered reading of the mechanical advantage of a BH. I assume this 3:1 is a formula they use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
These have what they call a offset double bevel edge. Do I need a certain left or right wing feather rotation?
 

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Victim of Geography
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thank you.

While we are at it, are you footing you hunting carbon shafts or is it a case of if the shaft hits home you are going to write it off? I'm just thinking of giving me the best possible chance if the shaft hits bone.

Sorry for all the questions!
 

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They've got the Deadhead shape but not the Deadhead ferrule. I've been under impressed with penetration from a number of heads that had that type of fat blunt tipped aluminum body. Doesn't take much bone to bring them to a screeching halt. I'd find some locals that are using equipment similar to yours and see what they say about the head. If you can't find them, stick with your Zwickeys.

I wouldn't worry about footing your shafts, I've never had one busted by an animal where a footing would have been any help. I'd would suggest putting a steel washer between the head and insert if you decide to use the Pathfinders.
 
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