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Hello Everyone I'm both new to traditional archery and this forum! I shot compound bows for 20 years now and just had the desire to go traditional. I know its gonna be a challenge and a learning process feels like I'm starting bowhunting/shooting all over again! I was advised on another forum that a good starter recurve was the Samrick Sage so that's what I got. Figured I'd start there and then work my way up to a higher end bow. I dont plan on hunting with it for a year or more until I'm completely confident. If you guys have any tips, preferences, advice feel free to tell me anything! Shooting style?? instinct, string walking, gap ect...? Grip??Practice techniques anything I'm all ears!! I did have one specific question what do you whitetail hunting guys recommend for arrow weight ? Typical set up as far as spine, broadhead weight, insert weights ect.? Perferred Broadheads? Thanks guys feel honored to be apart of the traditional community finally!
 

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Welcome to our merry band, The Sage is a good training bow. What draw weight limbs do you have and how tall are you? We need that to help with arrow selection.

My general advice is to start up real close with no aiming, just point the arrow and work on getting great form right away. See the Trad Talk Classic link at the top of this page. When your form is good you can gradually work your way back. Somewhere along the way you can decide if you want to stay with instinctive aiming or experiment with aiming methods. Form first, aiming later. - lbg
 

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I guess the best advice is get over on YouTube and watch some shooting videos. Jimmy Blackmon has videos on different aiming methods, and explains them in depth and precisely. Masters of the Barebow video series is another great resource. Then there’s the great (and a lot of very accomplished) folks on here and other forums, who are always willing to help. The Sage is a great choice, many folks I know love theirs. Another bit, which can be somewhat vexing, for a beginner in stickbows is getting some arrows tuned to your bow. Once you have that figured out, pick an aiming system, learn it, stick with it. Of course there are lots of different ways to go about it, depending on what you want to do with your recurve. If you’re planning to hunt with it eventually, I’d recommend checking out Dewayne Johnson’s fixed crawl method video, he’s a champion target shooter, and a hunter as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome to our merry band, The Sage is a good training bow. What draw weight limbs do you have and how tall are you? We need that to help with arrow selection.
My general advice is to start up real close with no aiming, just point the arrow and work on getting great form right away. See the Trad Talk Classic link at the top of this page. When your form is good you can gradually work your way back. Somewhere along the way you can decide if you want to stay with instinctive aiming or experiment with aiming methods. Form first, aiming later. - lbg
I did what most guys told me not to do and I started with 55 lb limbs I just didn't wanna start low then have to retune, reshoot, relearn all over again. I know being overbowed can teach bad habits so I may order a set of 40 lb limbs as well to get my form down but plan on hunting with the 55 lb. I'm 5'10" draw lengths right at 28"
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I guess the best advice is get over on YouTube and watch some shooting videos. Jimmy Blackmon has videos on different aiming methods, and explains them in depth and precisely. Masters of the Barebow video series is another great resource. Then there's the great (and a lot of very accomplished) folks on here and other forums, who are always willing to help. The Sage is a great choice, many folks I know love theirs. Another bit, which can be somewhat vexing, for a beginner in stickbows is getting some arrows tuned to your bow. Once you have that figured out, pick an aiming system, learn it, stick with it. Of course there are lots of different ways to go about it, depending on what you want to do with your recurve. If you're planning to hunt with it eventually, I'd recommend checking out Dewayne Johnson's fixed crawl method video, he's a champion target shooter, and a hunter as well.
Hey thanks alot I've been watching a bunch of videos on youtube. The Push short archery film was really good on explaining alot! He explains the fixed crawl method really well!
 

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Get the lighter limbs to start, 35# even, don’t go backwards like I did, learn your form and pick your aiming system with a lighter bow. Trust me on this one.
 

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“Hey thanks alot I've been watching a bunch of videos on youtube. The Push short archery film was really good on explaining alot! He explains the fixed crawl method really well!“
I meant to mention that video too. Nothing wrong with learning different ways of getting the results you want, be it scores, or making meat, or both. Focusing on one system at first is probably less confusing. I like the KISS approach because my teeny brain can only handle so much information at once🤣😂🤣 You’ll have plenty of time to change styles later if you feel the need to confuse yourself further down the road. Enjoy the journey my friend 🏹🏹🏹
 

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Shorten the learning curve as much as you can. Get a coach and you'll be hunting next fall.

Without not so much.

Bowmania
 

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I did what most guys told me not to do and I started with 55 lb limbs I just didn't wanna start low then have to retune, reshoot, relearn all over again. I know being overbowed can teach bad habits so I may order a set of 40 lb limbs as well to get my form down but plan on hunting with the 55 lb. I'm 5'10" draw lengths right at 28"
There's a reason why everyone says start at 25# or 35# max... Which you have heard.

If you are 5'10" I'd think you should be a longer draw length at full draw unless you have very short arms. You may not be even drawing 28" with your current poundage.
 

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I think everyone agrees that starting with ~ 25-35# is the best idea. And everyone agrees that having a coach get you started with good form is a good idea.

I personally would suggest that you start with either "shot gunning" or gaping to aim. I would advice against any of the "dont see the arrow" stuff. If you arent using at least a simple aiming system it can be hard to separate form problems from in your head problems when you are learning.

But no matter what you need good consistent form.
 

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If you're planning to hunt with it eventually, I'd recommend checking out Dewayne Johnson's fixed crawl method video, he's a champion target shooter, and a hunter as well.
That would be Dewayne Martin, not Johnson. Jimmy Blackmon also covers the fixed crawl method in one of his videos.

Welcome to the forum, Hoyt31786!
 

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although THE ROCK might be able to draw a string back........good catch Dave
welcome to the forum
 

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Develop a repeatable shot sequence. Jimmy Blackmon, Rod Jenkins and Tom Clum are great people to google or even get lessons from.

Welcome to the darkside, lol. This is a great place and the trad community is a wonderful group of people. Try to find other trad shooters in your area and attend shoots with them. You can learn a little bit from everyone in this sport.

Just keep it fun and dont stress too much about it. WE as a group tend to make this trad stuff seem more complicated than it really is. The best line Ive heard about traditional archery is this, "Traditional archery simple, you just have to do the same thing every single shot." You will get the comedy out of that line as you continue your trad archery journey.

Last thing, dont feel like you have to upgrade from the sage. It will do everything any other bow can do. As you shoot it and other bows you will learn what you like and dont like. I once had a custom bow made with a sage grip. That was an interesting conversation with the bowyer lol. Dont get hung up on upgrades, FOC or the latest arrow. Keep it simple, learn good form and then down the road educate yourself on tuning. I have a buddy who has shot a sage for the last 3 years and he has no intentions on getting anything else. He kills deer every year with his 40# sage and a 600 spine black eagle vintage arrow.
 

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and I'll say - - you might not ever need or want the 55 pound limbs.
hunting, 40# and a sharp SHARP broadhead placed right.....dead right there.
for now you should probbbBBly go 35# limbs......for learning FORM.
FORM takes a lot of repetitions......you will want to shoot a LOT of arrows....with good form.
Understand with the compounds you're holding 12 or 20 pounds......while the critter moves past that bush or comes down the trail............even at 35# it's like TWICE the weight of your compound you're holding at full draw for 30 seconds.
easy to say, HARDer to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Develop a repeatable shot sequence. Jimmy Blackmon, Rod Jenkins and Tom Clum are great people to google or even get lessons from.

Welcome to the darkside, lol. This is a great place and the trad community is a wonderful group of people. Try to find other trad shooters in your area and attend shoots with them. You can learn a little bit from everyone in this sport.

Just keep it fun and dont stress too much about it. WE as a group tend to make this trad stuff seem more complicated than it really is. The best line Ive heard about traditional archery is this, "Traditional archery simple, you just have to do the same thing every single shot." You will get the comedy out of that line as you continue your trad archery journey.

Last thing, dont feel like you have to upgrade from the sage. It will do everything any other bow can do. As you shoot it and other bows you will learn what you like and dont like. I once had a custom bow made with a sage grip. That was an interesting conversation with the bowyer lol. Dont get hung up on upgrades, FOC or the latest arrow. Keep it simple, learn good form and then down the road educate yourself on tuning. I have a buddy who has shot a sage for the last 3 years and he has no intentions on getting anything else. He kills deer every year with his 40# sage and a 600 spine black eagle vintage arrow.
Thanks so much yea doing the same thing every shot easier said than done hahaha!
 

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Yea, might be a good idea to get 40# limbs. (I also started shooting with a compound and still do most of the time.)
I've had 40, 50, and 55# limbs for a similar longbow. Even the 50s are hard to hold long enough for a precise shot. Ten yards on a deer maybe, but 40-45 if it means a precise shot, is probably the way to go.
I still shoot the 50s from time to time just for the fun of it. I learned on a couple of 3D shoots that 50# is too much to be accurate when you have to make one shot. 40# went much better. Shooting the bag in the back yard I can get good with the 50s after a few shots, but if your goal is hunting, that's not what you are doing.

I'll also add that hunting with traditional gear will take dedication. I got into traditional a few years ago coming from compound. Maintaining compound skills while learning traditional shooting is a long process, like years. If you are willing to give up compound shooting and go all-in on traditional might help, but your compound shooting will go down. If you start working on the traditional shooting all-in now, decide on August 1st what you will hunt with, then shoot only that. It's enough time to regain losses in your compound shooting if your trad shooting isn't where you want it to be. Then dive back into traditional after hunting season.
 

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I switched over from compound a few years back. Maybe some of my trial and error can help you. I'm no expert by any means but here are some of my conclusions based on my experiences.

While the sage is a fine starter bow, I had two, I would have recommended a Black Hunter. You can get both longbow and recurve limbs for the same riser and since you are starting out you can have some experience shooting both. I found to some degree this is a sport that lends a lot to personal preference.
I much preferred the LB to the recurve. Whatever you decide, I would seriously drop down to a much lighter limb. Have your draw length checked using the bow you are shooting. I was a solid 28.5 with the compound and with trad I run 27" to my anchor at the corner of my mouth and that is with perfect form and tension. That's a 3-4lb lose for me on most traditional bows. It becomes significant when you start getting into arrow spine. Most of my bows for hunting are somewhere between 43 and 48# at my 27".

I run 500 spine traditional only carbon arrows from 3 rivers at full length with either standard or 50 grain inserts and a variety of point weights from 125 to 175 gr. These arrows just seem to flat out work for me with bows in this range. They are pricey but extremely tough and long lasting. I wish I could recoup the money spent on lesser arrows. I could probably buy a really nice custom bow with that money.

My T/O hunting arrow weights run 460-560 depending on the bow. I shoot instinctively. I do not gap shoot or string walk but have an awareness of my arrow position as I use it somewhat consciously for the purpose of windage. Hope that makes sense.

As far as broadheads go for me, I wanted one that was 2 blades easily sharpened with a pull through sharpener and came in weights from 125-200 grains. The german jagger head is the one I zeroed in on. Reasonably priced and a decent head IMO. All the sizes I use are the same profile and length so I can change heads but my sight picture when shooting broadheads is the same. I'm sure there are better heads on the market but I find no problem with these so far. they suit my needs just fine.

My experience with a glove vs tab....I went by way of the glove. The best glove I found that saved my finger tips is made by American Leather and it's called the buffalo crossover. After I tried the first one, I bought two more for safe keeping. They are still in the packages. The glove gives me a slick release and it wears like iron and my finger tips don't feel a thing after hours of shooting. I tired probably 10 different gloves from $20-$40 and they all sucked and wore out quickly. This A/L glove is in a class by itself. Pricey up front but cheaper over the long haul and your fingers will love it.

Not sure if you have a trad pro shop by you. I don't. I found 3 Rivers online to be a great source for certain things. Buying bows online is hard however, Twig Archery is the place IMO. Small family business. John and his wife Gayle are wonderful people. You can get a black hunter ready to shoot and put on a scale so you know what poundage you are actually getting. I bought 5 bows from them and a couple of friend have done the same. Zero problems. Twigs premium fast flight flemish twist string in 16 stand is one of my go to strings. I'm not an endless loop string fan. The flemish twist from Twig as well as the 18 strand Fast Flight Plus Flemish twist from 3 rivers are the only strings I use now on all my bows. I probably went through trying 20 different strings before standardizing on these.

Think about quivers and what you prefer. If you want a bow mounted quiver start with one now. Shooting with a quiver will have an effect on your bow to a degree. If you are used to arrows on the bow do yourself a favor and start out that way. I would recommend the Thunderhorn 4 arrow. They make a standard non fancy model for @$55. You can get them through Twig or online elsewhere. It holds the 5/16 shafts that I shoot very well and locks onto the bow limb very well too. If you think you may not want a bow quiver mounted on the bow, I found the safari tuff duiker model side quiver to be my favorite way to carry arrows. While I have a couple thunderhorn quivers on a couple bows, I tend to prefer hunting without an attached quiver.

Think about how you hunt. If you are a treestand guy or a popup blind guy. Perhaps you like both or a climber? I spent the least time thinking about this and that I regret the most looking back at my first season with the longbow. With little exception, my ladder stand and blind setups were pretty much useless with the longer bows. No matter what you use regarding stands, spend a lot of time shooting from them and make the changes well ahead of the hunting season. I can't stress this enough. I read about this from other more experienced guys so many times but just seemed to skip over it. Dumb move on my part.

Best of luck. Hope some of my experience helps you find your way.
 

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I just stared a few months ago with a Sage and 30 and 40# limbs and that has worked great. Some told me not to worry about tuning my arrows to start but I found it much better to get the spine and head weight close.
I started out with recurves many years ago then went to compounds.
 
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