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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why are Bows cut outward of center-shot?
Is it primarily a strength issue for Wood or laminated Bows in the handle transition point?
What benefit or draw backs to Bows cut outward of center-shot?
In the reverse, what are the benefits of having a Bow cut to center-shot or past?
 

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"Is it primarily a strength issue for Wood or laminated Bows in the handle transition point?"

That would be my guess, Sam.

"What benefit or draw backs to Bows cut outward of center-shot?"

I can't think of a single benefit. Drawback would be a limited arrow spine for tuning.

"In the reverse, what are the benefits of having a Bow cut to center-shot or past?"

Most obvious would be a wider range of arrows would tune to the bow. They're just easier to shoot.


Be very interesting to see what others have to offer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Perfect answer Jim, thank you👍
Hope everybody reads this.
Now, tell us why a wider range of spines (deflection) will tune in a Bow cut closer to Center-shot?
 

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My understanding is as follows:

Start with a bow cut past center using a plunger.

The plunger will depress to center the arrow based on the side force from the archer's release. This is why you set up bows with the arrow offset about an arrow width outside of center.

The spring will adjust for release variations by attempting to keep the arrow as close to center as possible without bouncing off the riser.

You can change the optimal spine by changing plunger tension....sort of. I think it is really just a way of fine tuning the correctly spined arrow.

Presumably, setting the arrow further off center will allow you to shoot a weaker arrow. But at this point you are relying on greater bend to make up for a poorly chosen shaft.

More bend means more arrow vibration. I would think you would want to minimize that.

As such, you are only partially mitigating the impact of not making the best arrow choice. With a plunger you get two ways to mitigate; without you only get center shot.

If the bow is not cut past center, you get only get center shot to adjust but you will have to introduce more vibration into the arrow.

Arrows do not swim through the air, so vibration is not something that helps.

My conclusion is that cut past center allows you to mitigate some of the impact from not making the best arrow choice, rather than providing you more choices.

This may sound like a pedantic argument. In my mind the distinction is significant.
 

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My understanding has been that cutting past center gives more rest, strike plate and tune options. Bows cut way before center are your shelfed Asiatic and D bows that are structurally narrow at that point, so can't afford it.

Bows cut way past center are a pain though for us shelf shooters as you have to build up strike plate too much. Folk say at center is an easy tune due to spine options but they are generally harder for me. I like it on center or a hair past, so that the arrow is just 'looking left' (RH shooter) once I have strike plate on. Then it's a quick and predictable tune.
 

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Cut past center.
Better sight picture.
String alignment.
CENTER favor broader arrow tuning selections.
Super curved or high TS limbs favor center shot.
I have already posted pictures of arrows rest and how a adjustable shoot thru is a myth buster. I have been shooting one since barner inertia rest with finger at top state level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
linear

lĭn′ē-ər
adjective
  1. Of, relating to, or resembling a line; straight.
  2. In, of, describing, described by, or related to a straight line.
  3. Having only one dimension
At Center shot, the Arrow is Linear to the Bow string.
All the Bows force is exerted in a linear path to the Arrow.
 

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This is not a criticism of anyone or anything, just my personal observation. My two goto bows are cut 3/8" outside of center. Since I do not shoot the bow, I shoot the arrow and a slight cant puts my eye over the arrow, the arrow flies centered to my eye. I do not have tuning challenges, both bows get perfect arrow flight with a number of spines and point weights. Although I will admit that I am not attempting to tune carbon or wide thin walled aluminums. Wood arrows are much easier with outside of center bows, with narrow aluminums coming a close second. I have tried to help ASL shooters that have come from the past center bows to Hill bows and attempted to take their carbon arrows along in the transition. Lots of messing around with insert weight changes, shaft length changes and point weight changes. In every case taking out my box of test wood arrows we easily found a number of cedar arrows that shot as close to perfect as we could see. It is always one of five pounds down in spine to 5 pounds up in spine will be the right choice, and I have never once, including myself, found a shooter that could outperform a perfect flying wood arrow. I do have a set of carbons that flies perfect out of one of bows, I can shoot fairly tight groups, but i do not see my groups any different from good wood arrows to the carbon or aluminum arrows. The odd part, those carbons only fly out of the one bow, I have fir and cedar arrows that fly perfect out all of my bows in the 50 to 58 pound range.
 

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Cut to enter give you more spine options for a shelf shooter. Cut past for them is about useless unless your shooting plunger and wire rest set up of some sort.

You can have a good shooting bow that outside of center. You will have a smaller range of spined arrows that will shoot well off it unless you start canting the bow.

seen plenty people shoot a way out of tune bow well. I often wondered if they shot one tuned how well the would really shoot?

HH~
 

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Another way of saying would be.
I can throw a ball side arm curve just as accurate as over hand, but not as far.
Casting works with cant with finger release the string side ways.
Off topic
Happy Thanksgiving you all
 

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I am not into the reason behind why but it’s just easier for me to tune a bow cut to center or passed. I realize the arrow bends less so I could by choice get away shooting a higher spine arrow. I also like using arrows that are not the normal 5/16” round. Like Easton Axis.
 

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Im fairly certain the following is the reason that being closer to center shot means less sensitivity to spine differences.

1 What matters is the flying arrows deflection from the line of the arrow at full draw(more or less.)

2 That deflection is a multiplicative function of the arrows tendency to flex, and the force exerted on the arrow by the riser.(the tendency to flex probably varies with the force but thats not really an issue here.)

3 As the arrow line approaches center shot the also the force exerted on are arrow approaches zero( really zero + release torque)

So for any 2 given arrows of differing spine, the farther from center shot, the greater the difference in deflection between them. .
 

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This riser is cut 5/16" or .3125" past center. I have a calf hair side plate .011" thick.
.3125-.011=.3015" cut to center.
.3015"×2=.603" diameter arrow shaft would center on this riser.
Tuned arrow shaft is .285 Gold Tip 500. Puts that shaft .159" inside center shot. In which compensation of my off face string alignment.
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Finger Wood Nail Carmine Human leg
 
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