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All modern bows have enough cast to get the job done, from a faster bow to a slower bow the difference in lob is not as much as most would think from 30 yards and under and that difference is easily remedied by using a lighter arrow and a higher penetrating broad head in most cases. The finish that Nate Steen puts on his bows with a good coating of automotive wax will hold off wetness for years. Same for wood arrows a good finish waxed will keep an arrow from being water soaked after going through a deer , through the fall, winter and spring thaw and still weigh the exact same as when it was new. Feathers, Scotch Guard or dry fly spray keeps the feather fairly durable in everything except perhaps a waterfall. What I consider more important than wet conditions in rocky terrain is durability and can you shoot that bow with wet hands. For something durable and readily available and can be shot with wet hands, I would go with a Howard Hill longbow.
 

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Oh one little minor point, a vinyl water protecting and tied on bag over the arrows in a back quiver does a very good job in down pours. It will slow you up if you take a shot and want to go for a quick second shot, but things don't happen fast in mountain down pours anyway, other than lightening, which is really fast.
 

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I'd go with a takedown bow of some sort, for the first trip like this, and see what you run into. A nice one piece would be great to have, but, when it comes to wiping it down at the end of the night, drying it out, etc, a one piece would be rather unwieldy, especially if it's raining and you have to do it in your tent.

Yes, bows are tools. In this case, even though my experience isn't quite what you're referring to for hunting, I'd err on the side of caution for now. Go with a metal riser and some monolith or carbon foam ilf limbs. @Remote can attest to the effectiveness, considering that's what he uses to hunt in forested and jungle type areas. I went with similar, using a metal riser, and carbon wood limbs for use in the jungles of Guam, and even though I never got anything, I did get caught out in the rain several times, and had no issues with it whatsoever.

If you go carbon wood or all wood limbs, make sure you take a stick of string wax and a good cloth, both for waxing the limbs and string.
 
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The bow is the cheapest part of a multi day hunt for most if us.
My hunting buddy and I were after some goats, in real dense bush. We had just been on all fours under some giant grasses and vines and machete'd our way through a wall of gorse (thorny hardwood), using our bows to hold the rest of it back as we pushed through.

On the other side was a rocky slope and we needed some vantage for our next push, goats bleating in the distance. I opted to scout, so left my metal ILF at the bottom of the slope and boulder climbed my way up, a couple of handy root holds. When I pulled myself over the top fist sized rocks I didn't guess would be there tumbled down, straight to where my bow was (lesson learned). I could hear the distinct "ding" of two hitting my riser. I feared for the limbs.

Scout done, I dropped some para and lined down, checked the bow and it had a decent 2mm chip in the 7075 alu. Limbs weren't touched. If that riser was wood, hunt would've been over, no doubt. Stone would've been a chisel, bow gone.

Not just about the money, but about losing something more precious than money (love my single pieces), and a precious day or weekend out hunting.

Each to their own, I will always lean on metal for rough country, or a tough sub 200 buck TD like the Black Hunter.
 

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Further, this is a simple sport and has been for 60,000 years or more. Do not obsess about trivial issues. Master the basics. - lbg
 

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A bow is just a tool to be utilized. I have woodworking tools from as early as 1860 (many more from the very early part of 1900's) and use them all the time. Tool collectors faint when they hear this. The people who designed and built these tools had an expectation that they would be used and enjoyed. I think no better tribute to the those craftsmen is to wear them out by use and not put then on a shelf or behind glass to be admired.

Most of the dings and dents can be repaired, and should not affect the function of the bow. Bring a small bottle of CA glue to patch any abrasions in the finish. Once you get back after the hunt you can sand and blend it in with the surrounding finish.

New evidence for the use of the bow and arrow is 71,000 years. I would imagine even further.

 

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How do you think the human race survived without 3 piece bows? - lbg
Our ancestors in ancient Africa did great with true stick and string. I'm sure though they would have been pretty keen on adopting some of the fancy new tech we enjoy, like laminations with high tech glues, fibreglass and carbon backings, metal and wood take down bows with synthetic fibre strings, were they to appear in their hands. They bring many advantages.

Looking at any one of my single piece fibreglass-backed laminated bows I doubt they would even call them 'wood' They would want to know where this strange mix of materials grows.

I will try hunting with my single piece 50lb Slick Stick next year. So light and deft in hand. A great and simple bow for the easy country. Nothing beats a longbow among the trees. But not the subalpine and steep terrain where your hands are on the rocks, or all-fours under dense foliage or doing deep river crossings where you slip over almost always. For this a rugged takedown, in my backpack a lot of the time, is the best and most practical tool for the job. If going for a week I would prob pack spare limbs.

Compounds and single piece bows share the same base limitation there: more prone because they are less portable. In that way a lot more to go wrong.
 

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I guess the question to be asked is how many hunts were interrupted because of a catastrophic failure of the bow. Depending on the percentages if high enough then efforts should be made to remediate this from happening. If it is a low number then enjoy the trip and put your energy into the mission of being successful in the hunt. Risk analysis can help set the priority.
 

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My compound year. I sold my Hill Tembo. i bought a used Bear Take down, my brother dry fired it and blew up. Adlers Archery had a Wing Vantage Pro, I went to get it, they talked me into a Wing impact 2 wheeler and fiberglass arrows to go with it. The draw was way longer than it should have been. I had a small buck come by on opening morning, The only deer I have ever shot at from a tree. i shaved it twice with those impact razor blade thingies. Such remarkably bad arrow flight, I could hardly believe it myself and it hurt my hand when I shot. On the way back to the car I saw the riser was cracked right across the grip. That was 50 years ago, I went through 3 bows in one season that year. Durability counts.
 
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