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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I’m a new member to the forum but I’ve been reading here and there throughout the years. I apologize if this question has already been answered but I can’t seem to find anything definitive…

I live in the northwest and plan to be hunting in rain and snow regularly, and am currently looking into buying a grizzly or kodiak magnum. I know these bows can handle a day of rain, but will they hold up on a backpacking trip of say 3 to 4 days in consistent rain?

Thanks in advance
 

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Hi all,

I’m a new member to the forum but I’ve been reading here and there throughout the years. I apologize if this question has already been answered but I can’t seem to find anything definitive…

I live in the northwest and plan to be hunting in rain and snow regularly, and am currently looking into buying a grizzly or kodiak magnum. I know these bows can handle a day of rain, but will they hold up on a backpacking trip of say 3 to 4 days in consistent rain?

Thanks in advance
Welcome!

As long as the coat isn't degraded, you should be fine. Problem is it just takes a nick on a rock etc. Humidity needs time to creep in far, but wood does expand in the process.

For the multi day hike hunts in very wet country (I do also) I place trust in a metal riser and monolith limbs, shot off the shelf. TradVanes on the arrows. So little to go wrong.

All said, I've rarely heard of modern wood lam bows having a problem in wet conditions.
 

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I would not worry as much on bow failure several days in the rain - more I would worry over my own level of comfort or "failure" haha.
consider all the millions of wood bows down the years that endured the weather.
WAX BOW GOOD & go.....pack some bow wax in your kit. dry it at night & wax it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the insight! I’m sure my concern over the bow failure is just a case of mild anxiety 😅. I’ve also been considering investing in a satori as the black limbs look to be completely encased in carbon and I assume would be more durable through the years. I live on the east side of the cascades and there is a lot of loose basalt that I’ve been known to slip on. Do you guys think the extra $400-500 is worth the piece of mind if I do happen to bang my bow against a rock?
 

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Being the bow is wood you are depending on that manufacturer has properly coated the bow. A wood bow would to be my choice hunting under those conditions, there are too many other better choices.
Hunting in an occasional rain is one thing but hunting in the rain and snow regularly a metal riser ILF bow with limbs that have no wood in them is a much better choice. Hunting regularly in the rain with a wood bow would keep me wondering about the condition of the bow.
 

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Thank you for the insight! I’m sure my concern over the bow failure is just a case of mild anxiety 😅. I’ve also been considering investing in a satori as the black limbs look to be completely encased in carbon and I assume would be more durable through the years. I live on the east side of the cascades and there is a lot of loose basalt that I’ve been known to slip on. Do you guys think the extra $400-500 is worth the piece of mind if I do happen to bang my bow against a rock?
If you are after a multi-day all-weather hunting solution, my bias says yes - a metal riser is the way to go. I personally do not like taking nice wood or any expensive risers, nor arrows, on rough hikes, lest of all multi-day. You need a bow you can really haul and thrash around without worrying about it. Drop down a cliff on a line if you need, slide down a slip, cross a river and fall over, not feel nervous about it taking a whack. You need a bow that you can afford to knock around, that will still hit hard and will go the distance. Rough going is no place for precious wood or otherwise expensive bows IMO.

You could just get the Satori riser but some better limbs for less. Or you could get another metal riser that is cheaper but does the job just as well as the Satori, and put some high quality inexpensive limbs on them. I can recommend the EXE Scream, sold by Lancaster Archery (F261 on Aliexpress, eBay, etc). that has a larger sight picture, is cheaper but arguably at least as good as the Satori in every respect. Machined 7075 aircraft alu. I would then grab some heavy hitting carbon monolith limbs like the Nika N3's (a lot of us around here shoot them now), or even the cheaper Nika C1's, or perhaps some carbon/foam Akusta's, Kinetic's, Sanlida's (if you want to save even further) or the slightly pricier TradTech or Buck Trail cross-carbon/woods.

Total outlay can easily be less than USD500.

EDIT: added Links
 

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I've NOT GONE & DONE IT - the several days in rain in the Pacific NW. so my opinion is moot.
but all of it is theory unless you have experience with it.
I'd say try it with the Bear bow you want to use, take care of it when you can, and use it like you want to, and see how it goes.
it's all experience. enjoy it. if bow fails 3 days out - it wasn't a good call.
but my money is = bow would be fine.....see my first line......I'm a poet & don't know it.....
 
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I've NOT GONE & DONE IT - the several days in rain in the Pacific NW. so my opinion is moot.
but all of it is theory unless you have experience with it.
I'd say try it with the Bear bow you want to use, take care of it when you can, and use it like you want to, and see how it goes.
it's all experience. enjoy it. if bow fails 3 days out - it wasn't a good call.
but my money is = bow would be fine.....see my first line......I'm a poet & don't know it.....
Everyone seems to agree, a wood bow used in the way described is a roll of the dice. The key phrase is “hunting in the rain often”. Why create something to be concerned about.
 

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Spent 37 years on the “wet” side of Washington. Did a backpack 17 day hunt in the wilderness area 7.5 miles in with an old Chapparal Kaibab longbow. It made it through no problem. Weather ranged from 30’s and snow, 50’s and rain, and 80’s with hot sun. That was all in one day. Lol. Be more concerned with arrow prep, and string care. I will say that feathers on aluminum without a wrap was not a good choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks a million for the responses everyone. I think I know what I’ll do… buy the ILF bow first, then pick up some overtime throughout the year and buy a pretty wood bow. Luckily I have a beautiful bow from I think the 80s that was made by Mike Hatten. It was given to me by my uncle and he can’t recall who Mike Hatten is, but I suspect he worked for Damon Howatt. Unfortunately it has a pretty gnarly gash in the glass so I’ve only shot it a handful of times. As a side note, if anyone knows who Mike Hatten is that would be very interesting to me.
 

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I live and hunt in the inland nw.
Ive not experienced any issues with wood bows in the rain. I do lately heavily lean on metal riser though. Makes things more fool/bomb proof. As in I ran my bow over this year and had new limbs in under a week and back to hunting for the end of early elk.
Trade offs in all I guess. I much prefer packing a wood bow around.
 

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I too would rather have a light wood bow in hand on a long walk, any time really. Nothing feels better. But the moment I hit vines, dense foliage, rocky climbs and slips, I always wish I brought my metal ILF with me.

EDIT: only exception to this is when I hit the valleys with my Black Hunter bolt down longbow. That thing feels near-indestructable, and at under 200 bucks, also expendable. My hunting buddy swears by his for the hard country. Dymondwood/micro-lam riser and limbs that double as crowbars. If limb or riser gets a show-stopping nick or dent, I can replace it for very little. Hope to get out with it more in 2023.
 

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Ole Fred used his wood bows for walking sticks, hunted in Alaska, African plains, etc. If anyone abused a bow it was him. BUT, he had a backup. If I was planning a multi day hunt in the mountains, rain or no rain I would have a TD bow and a spare set of limbs.
 

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Ole Fred did not always have a backup. He once came to shore in a canoe or boat, threw his bow ashore and then dragged the vessel over it, breaking it. A buddy had a spare right hander but Fred had switched to lefty having lost a right finger tip. Fred carved and glued that righty into a lefty and shipped a replacement when he got back to the factory.

For me, there is more to go wrong in a takedown bow. I would take a wooden bow, a spare string and a lump of beeswax, which I do about every day. On a distant trip I would take a second bow. They only weigh about two pounds and I have several lying around. - lbg
 
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A good 3 peice bow has only slightly more to go wrong than a 1 piece(not an ILF) and because its its more compact its slightly less likely to break while traveling.

I think its six of one vs a half dozen of the other. .
 

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A good 3 peice bow has only slightly more to go wrong than a 1 piece(not an ILF) and because its its more compact its slightly less likely to break while traveling.

I think its six of one vs a half dozen of the other. .
True, but I can't replace a damaged riser, limb, or limbs on a one piece when I get back home. That's when the tradeoff becomes a little clearer IMO.

Any case for a week+ hard hike and hunt I would prefer to pack in a metal riser with a spare limb (if symmetrical) or limbs rather than 2 single piece wood bows. No brainer. This despite the fact I like single piece wood bows by far the most.
 

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Have you ever seen the videos Fred Bear made on his hunts? His bows were just as they are now and he'd throw them on the ground and bounce them around as if they were just tools to be used and abused. Guess what, they still worked. This is all much ado about nothing. Just go hunt.

Now, if your planning on using a homemade self bow, whole different story.
 

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If only all of us could afford to throw and bounce around pretty hand crafted wood/glass single piece bows on multi day hunts. Our Bear Cheyenne, a finely finished violin of a bow, stays at home.
 
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