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Several years ago my father-in-law tried to give me a old Bear recurve. I didnt want to take as he bought it new in like 1960. Well he just passed away and my mother-in-law insisted I take it as she knows my love for hunting. It's Bear Alaskan, 62" / 45#, has black and orange limbs. My question. I would love to hunt with it as my father-in-law told me several stories of deer he harvested with this bow. But, if it's vintage and worth quite a bit or if being that old it may cause damage I'll put it up. Not sure?
 

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Bart Harmeling
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Some pictures of the riser, limbs and tips would help as far telling whether it is shoot-able. Do you know how the bow has been stored? Sometimes these old bows end up in the attic and have been subjected to high summer temps. I haven't been following vintage bear prices. I'd encourage you to hang on to it as it was given with respect. You know the stories that go with that bow.
 

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They aren't all that expensive so don't worry about that. What you have is a 1959 or 1960 Alaskan longbow. They shoot quite well and are pretty popular due to the striking colors of the glass. Nicknamed the Halloween bow because of the black and orange glass. I foolishly sold mine and it was destroyed in shipping. I used to try to shoot mine every Halloween just for the fun of it.
 

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Just a guess, but I'd say your father in law would rather see you take it to the woods than hang it on the wall.
 

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Take it to the woods! As long as the bow isn't coming apart and you use a dacron string, you shouldn't have any problems. I have a couple of late 50's and early 60's Bear bows that get shot quite often.
 
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