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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've been shooting two bareshafts with each end of six arrows and am not sure if the bareshafts are flying correctly.

Pinnacle II riser with 36lb Axiom limbs, Bear Weather rest, 18 strand FF Flemish string.
Brace set to 8.25", nock tied over and under at .75", even tiller, limb bolts all the way in.
Beman ICS Bowhunter 500s (7.3 gpi), 140g field points, 3x5" feathers.
I draw 31", shoot split with a Bateman tab, am right handed.

I'm still a beginner, and my groups aren't consistent yet.
The bareshafts seem to group reasonably well with fletched arrows, but they land aiming down and to the left.
The setup isn't noisy, minimal vibration, but there is some wear to the nub on the weather rest.
I can't see any fishtailing or porposing.

I reviewed the bareshaft tuning instructions from ACS A&H, but I'm not sure if this flight is correct.

Here's a quick pictoral of how my bareshafts are landing. They group in the middle of my fletched arrows, just at a funny angle. Maybe it's perfectly normal, I'm not sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Only 10 yards in the backyard. It's a 16x16" target in front of a plywood backstop. I'm still getting used to instinctive, and I'm not quite comfortable shooting past 15 yards. Once I start going to the range I'll get more practice in without fear of stray arrows in the neighborhood...
 

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That could easily be interpreted as nock high and stiff. However, since you're grouping that with your fletched lets not jump to any conclusions yet. What distance are you shooting from? Well, add 5 to to 10 yards to that and try it again. If you continue to group bare and fletched together, since you say you're still pretty new, with less than tight grouping, call it good for now. If at the longer distance the bare then separate out from the fletched, you should then have results that are easier to interpret with a higher degree of confidence.

Many will say that tuning is a waste with a new shooter. Yes and no. Without consistent form any results from attempting to tune are somewhat questionable. But at the same time if your gear is so out of whack that you can't hit the side of a barn from the inside, then you get no feedback on whether or not what you're doing is working.

Tuning is never wasted time, because if nothing else it calls for the shooter to be as good and on top of their form as they can possibly muster. When approached properly, time spent tuning can also serve as some quality practice time.
 

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If inconsistent, Rednef is correct. It just takes a lot more arrows to get a result. Don't be afraid to throw out the obvious bad shoots.

BTW I have a target that kicks every bare shaft I shoot into it way left ten yards.
 

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Rednef said it better than I could.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
At 10yds I can consistently keep all arrows (fletched/bare) on my 16x16" target shooting instinctive.
Sometimes they land in a 6" group with one outlier, other times the spread fills the target.
Without fail, bareshafts land aiming down and to the left, within the group.
I interpret the bareshaft landing angle as an equipment/setup error, not a form error?
Fletched arrows almost always land nice and straight.
If I need to move back to 15/20yds, then I need to figure out a better backstop or hit the range on weekends.
Should I affix a temporary sight to reduce my aiming error?

Or, maybe just put away the bareshafts and call it close enough :)
 

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In my opinion Rednef pretty much nailed it.

I would work on your form and enjoy your bow. Readdress the tuning somewhere down the road when you can back up a little, tuning at 10 yards isn't telling you much.
 

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I am a new shooter and only has been shooting for about a year. Only the last few months that I started bareshafting. I only bareshaft up to around 30 meters since this is the distance that I can get good grouping, with shaft hitting about 10 - 20 cm to the right of fletched arrow.

If my form is consistent and my release is good, my arrow will fly ok, and I always tune for slightly weak arrow, I found that this give me a forgiving arrow. Regularly I will bareshaft at around 15 to 20 m. This is more as a form check rather than the need for bareshaft.

My problem is more with my release, or relaxing the muscles of my right hand to release the string. I usually pull back the string and in the process plucking the string. If this happened then no matter what distance, the bare shaft always show way too stiff shaft.
 

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Should I affix a temporary sight to reduce my aiming error?
As a dedicated Gap/conscious aim guy myself I would definitely recommend that.

I do admit that a high level of precision can be attained with "instinctive" shooting. However I do still hold that that only comes after years (decades?) of shooting and even if one puts in the time, odds are still against you. VERY VERY few people are properly "wired" to become very good with it.

Putting a sight on would definitely help with tuning in that it would provide more reliable results for interpretation. However it may be counter indicated if you're committed to wanting to shoot instinctive. It all kind of depends on what you want to do and where your head is at. If you think that you may want to transition to some form of a conscious aiming method the addition of a sight that will ultimately be taken off can actually help with that.

Given that I basically suck at instinctive I would say that if you're dead set on it, don't add the sight, just see what happens at a longer distance and then run with it for a while.

BTW thanx guys. I appreciate the thoughts. Wish I could say I was some sort of Sooper Genius, but most of it is stuff learned from others (some of whom are already here on this thread) or figured out the hard way.
 

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Put a ball in front of your target on the ground, move the ball forward or backward 'til you aim your point at the ball and your arrows hit the target.

Use it till you get a fair tune. You may learn the gap from that also
 

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Here is the idea. Put a ball down to aim the arrow point at. We don't care where the group is hitting on the target. We are just looking for the group.



Got the idea?
 

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A couple of bales of hay and a ratchet strap to create a bigger target might help you a lot. It's gotta be hard to focus on your shooting when you're worried about hitting a small target....
I have three bales stacked and compressed and use a plastic golf wiffle ball pegged at the bottom to do my tuning. I know you want to shoot instinctive but being able to put the tip of your arrow directly on a target adds some precision and consistency and until you have that I'm guessing that finding the right course of action is going to be difficult. Placing the point of the arrow precisely on that wiffle ball should lead to better groups and better, more consistent groups should let you know more precisely what's going on with your arrows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
OK, so here's my plan.
1. Improve my target and backstop, hay bales with paper targets, rubber/carpet backstop.
2. Find my point-on aim with the use of a movable target ball.
3. Try a sight, have a 4-pin from my old compound I can try.
4. Practice
 

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A couple of bales of hay and a ratchet strap to create a bigger target might help you a lot. It's gotta be hard to focus on your shooting when you're worried about hitting a small target.....
Great stuff here - your bale can never be too big. The one on my deck is 6 x 4 and the one out in the woods is 4 x 4 it lets you practice with out fear.
 

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Thanks Matt. I don't know how you can learn without a large target. I've used homemade bale presses since I started shooting back in the '70's. You can add a length of string vertically and aim point on at the bottom of that rope to adjust centershot/plunger/side plate by doing walk-backs. You can aim point on at a horizontal rope to determine gaps and map the trajectory of your arrows. You can do blank bale practice for form, horizontal and vertical drills for accuracy, multiple aim drills...the benefits are endless.
Heck, if you look at the wounds in the frame of this one it's pretty evident that you can miss one too, even one this big! Don't know how I could make it with a 16"x16"....
 

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I love the ball on the ground idea, especially since my POA is somewhere a few feet in front of the bale. Too bad I can't shoot on a range that way. I never know from one round to the next which lane I'll be shooting in, and they don't really care for someone wandering around before each round looking for a good place to put the ball.
 

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I love the ball on the ground idea, especially since my POA is somewhere a few feet in front of the bale. Too bad I can't shoot on a range that way. I never know from one round to the next which lane I'll be shooting in, and they don't really care for someone wandering around before each round looking for a good place to put the ball.
LOL - when we did Rusty's 90 meter challange I had to set up a step ladder to put the paper plate I was aiming at up in the tree - that really would have created a stir at the range.

Matt
 
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