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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I DUNNO.
So I'm asking.
About all my knowledge (skimpy at best) revolves around the low-stretch stuff.
I have a vintage Browning Wasp 56" bow coming probably TODAY.
Guessing it has & "needs" DACRON.
SOME SAY (I've read) B55 is significantly better than the old B50 standby.
What say you that have b50 & b55 experience?
thanks in advance.
 

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Bart Harmeling
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If you already own one or the other, just use it up. If not, you'll likely need to get B55 as Brownell products are pretty scarce.
 

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I've no extensive experience with both fibres. IMHO, the difference between
the two is Brownell's has one "5" and BCY's has two "5's". From the Net,
a confusing fibble-fabble:

http://www.n566aj.com/cgi-bin/bbs/archive.cgi?read=32790
"Dacron is a trademarked name for a polyester fiber and fabrics made from it.
So all Dacron is polyester, but not all polyester is Dacron®."

https://www.abbeyarchery.com.au/p/BRBD05/Brownell+B50+Dacron+Bow+String+Material+1-4+lb.html:
Brownell B50 Dacron Bow String Material 1-4 lb Description
"Brownell B-50 Dacron waxed bowstring material is a polyester composition."

3R's:
"BCY's B55 is a durable, 100% high-performance polyester string material.
(Polyester is the kind of material the old slower "Dacron" was made from.)"

BCY:
"B55 Bowstring - 100% polyester similar to Dacron
but with better durability and very low stretch."

and :confused::
 

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If you make your own strings you should take into account that B55 stretches about 5 to 6 inches. B50 stretches about 4 inches.
 

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Locomo
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If you make your own strings you should take into account that B55 stretches about 5 to 6 inches. B50 stretches about 4 inches.
Inches or Millimeters?.....
 

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If you make your own strings you should take into account that B55 stretches about 5 to 6 inches. B50 stretches about 4 inches.
Is this true? And if so, was it based on a single strand of a particular length, or a finished string? B50 is a smaller diameter strand which would make it stretch more if all other variables are the same.

Can you reflect on the string creep over time? My understanding is that if strings from both materials are pre-stretched in the same way the B55 will creep considerably less over time.

I'm interested in learning more about this. I have made strings from B55 without any real problems with creep after the initial settling period. The fastflight strings I have made seem to never creep at all, but I have no experience with B50.
 

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Think of it has a guitar string :

First string (first): “Fast Flight”

Second string (fourth): B55

Last string (sixth): B50

I use B55 mostly . . . but it depends of the bow itself.

What the bow doesn’t like & what the bow does like !

regards,

John
 

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Don’t know about stretch or do I care. I had 10 Ring make me a B-55 for my old super K. Sure is a improvement over the last B-50 I had made for it.
 

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Premium Member
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I used B50 for years before I upgraded to D97. I never had any Flemish or endless string stretch anywhere near that much.

Sorry, Steve, I don't have any experience with B55 so I can't help you.
 

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Maybe my B55 is different, but I expect it to stretch on average between .5-1" within the first week, and then not much after that. I consider this more of it settling in than stretching; although I'm sure it's doing bit of that too.

The only B50 string I had was the stock string that came with my Samick Journey, and I had to periodically add a couple of twists, but still not that much.
 

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jtrops mae a good comment about settling in. When you make a string the fibers are covered with wax and do not yet rest close to their mate. Rubbing the string hard with a bit of leather while pulling it tight will warm the wax and cause the strands to settle among themselves. So will handing it with a weight on it. This is all more settling than stretching and will be greater if the string was carelessly made without firm twisting, especially in the case of Flemish twist strings, whether the fiber is low stretch or not. The effect will be much greater in a carelessly made string. One of my first attempts to make my own slipped so much it fell apart. If well made they all stabilize fairly quickly. - lbg
 

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Civil but Disobedient
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Think of it has a guitar string :

First string (first): "Fast Flight"

Second string (fourth): B55

Last string (sixth): B50

I use B55 mostly . . . but it depends of the bow itself.

What the bow doesn't like & what the bow does like !

regards,

John
Speaking of guitar strings, I took five bows and tuned them to the notes of the minor pentatonic scale. I had to use compounds for the high notes, and I had to take what I got with them. I was not going to tune a compound. I posted about this a number of years ago. Not sure what forum that was.
 

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Barebow recurve
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Both are about the same, in my experience. Just be sure to make the string a bit short to account for the stretch so you don't end up with a crazy number of twists.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks FOR aLL THE GOOD ANSWERS.
I found my 2 B50 spools this morning after digging through some boxes.
I have made exactly ONE STRING......under Bart's careful tutelage.
I think I'll dig my stuff out & make several strings TO GET ONE RIGHT hahaa.....when it's colder and I'm inside more.
 

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I found a youtube video that demonstrates how to make a flemish twist string. It also show how much the dacron string stretches if anyoane is interested in watching.

 

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I found a youtube video that demonstrates how to make a flemish twist string. It also show how much the dacron string stretches if anyoane is interested in watching.

That is an interesting way to make a flemish string, but it is a very loose method. My thoughts are that the method of building the string is introducing a lot of slack in the individual strands, and he has more settling as a result.

My strings don't have nearly that much give in them after I string them. I do the same stretching method on my bow as he shows in the vid, but I only gain 1/2" or, thereabouts at that point, and by the end of the week shooting 1-200 arrows it is another little bit longer. After that it is pretty stabile.
 

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I must say, a lot of good information here, especially since I just got started in a recurve/trad bows. Now I know why my string seems to be stretching.... settling in.
 
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