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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi, does anyone know what would cause this? The black skid-mark on the shaft is where the arrow is contacting the leather strike plate after only a few shots. There's also scuffing on the leather strike plate and bow itself from the arrow.

The arrows then go high and to the right even at pretty close range.

3197

The arrow nock is pretty tight on the string so maybe that's part of the problem, I'm pretty new so don't know much about tuning yet.

Has anyone seen this type of thing before?

Any help would be great, thanks!
 

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If you put heavy enough points on them (like 200 grains) , they will fly straight, but be slow. You shop doesn't know finger shooting, he sold you arrows 1 or 2 spines too stiff. If you can get some Easton XX75 1716s they will fly better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you put heavy enough points on them (like 200 grains) , they will fly straight, but be slow. You shop doesn't know finger shooting, he sold you arrows 1 or 2 spines too stiff. If you can get some Easton XX75 1716s they will fly better.
That's a pain then. It definitely couldn't have something to do with the arrow nocks being too tight on the string or the nocking point being wrong?
 

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If the nock end of the arrow is just above (1/8-1/16 inch) square with the string it is close enough. Tight nocks aren't helping, but probably not the issue.
 

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good on you for being new to this & yet still seeing that your arrow is hitting the riser.
ANY TIME there's contact it means simply the arrow is not correctly matching up well, is too stiff or too weak.
I agree with c m shooter - - you need a weaker arrow, so your choice is EITHER - a different shaft or heavier points.
 

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I don't know actually. I have had the same problem as you. I have a 36 lb bow and have been recommended arrows from 400 to 700 spine. I also had problems with the tight nocks. I solved that with something called accunock but it didn't solve everything. People like to recommend different string diameters but that was getting too complicated for me. I did try the different weight on the tip. I have screw in points and it was easy to mess with that, and it does make a difference. I finally settled on 125 grains on 600 spine arrows and a thin metal strike plate. I wanted to try teflon but the brass was working well enough. Neither the strike plate nor the arrow seems to suffer a lot of damage and fly straight enough. I did shoot some bare shafts and impact was the same as the fletched arrows. Good enough for my purposes.
 

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Ya, those arrows are way too stiff for your bow with the points that are on them. The fact that you left them at the full 32" length and that your draw length is longish reduce the mismatch. If heavier points are readily available for those shafts, there is a simple remedy: get heavier ones, several if available.

Second, lengthen your draw. Most newcomers can readily get up to two more inches with postural and form improvements, which is highly desireable. Stiffish arrows remind you to work on that. which is a multiyear project unless you have a really good coach.

Or, you could just get some lighter spine arrows and save these until you are ready to get heavier limbs, say 35#.

I favor the first solution; heavier points and grow into these 600 shafts. - lbg
 

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I agree with others on the arrow being too stiff. I know from my experiences that at 30lbs I am shooting 800 spine arrows with 150 grain points. On a 600 I would be way stiff with 200 grains up front.
 
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