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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Can any one explain me why my arrows are dropping so much after 20 yards? At 25 yards they drop about 10 in.

I'm shooting a 62", 35# recurve bow, with Easton avance arrows. 660 spine, 110gr points, 29.25in length and AAE WAV vanes. 308gr total weight. 29in draw lenght.

Are the arrows too light or what?
 

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Hi,

Can any one explain me why my arrows are dropping so much after 20 yards? At 25 yards they drop about 10 in.

I'm shooting a 62", 35# recurve bow, with Easton avance arrows. 660 spine, 110gr points, 29.25in length and AAE WAV vanes. 308gr total weight. 29in draw lenght.

Are the arrows too light or what?
I think 35# will do it. Recurves are not like compounds and start off with very little energy, at lower poundages they will drop pretty fast. Coming from compounds this is something I had to deal with when I started traditional archery.
I am a backyard shooter and hunter, I limit my hunting to 15 yards, 20 yards max when using a recurve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think 35# will do it. Recurves are not like compounds and start off with very little energy, at lower poundages they will drop pretty fast. Coming from compounds this is something I had to deal with when I started traditional archery.
I am a backyard shooter and hunter, I limit my hunting to 15 yards, 20 yards max when using a recurve.
Hmm... that's a bummer. I'm shooting instinctive and it's kind of difficult to approximate the drop at longer distances. Guess I should pump up the poundage, right. But don't know if my shoulders can take it.
Cheers
 

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That sounds about right to me with a 9ggp arrow. If you want a flatter trajectory, you'll have to get a lighter arrow. 6 or 7 ggp will increase it a few yards.
 
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I don't know how flat a trajectory you were expecting but what you described sounds about normal give or take a little. It is just a matter of shooting it enough to learn to adjust your trajectory.
 

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Sounds like you're point-on at 20.
You'll need some shorter and/or faster arrows to push that out a ways.
 

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If you have a copy of "Shooting the Stickbow" in one of the chapters the author shows a theoretical table of arrow drops for a bow shooting 200 fps, and sighted in for 20 yds. The table shows that at 30 yds, there is already a drop of over 13". After the theoretical table, he goes on to states that most recurves are significantly below 200 fps. They will be in the 160 to 190 fps range, and the arrow drop will be even greater.

As a quick aside, in the same book, the author notes that most of his students shooting bows between 25-30# have no trouble reaching 70m with their recurves, albeit they have to crank their sights way down.
 

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Tracker1,

Don't know, you'd just have to shop around, but the OP is using 110 grain tips. If he'd change to 55 grain tips that would drop him to 7.2 ggp--big difference in speed.

I've got some Linkboy 800 carbons, 29" long with 55 grain tips that weigh 240 grains. That would make 6.8 gpp at 35#.

In my 3D bow (70" Hoyt Matrix riser w/Uukha Ex1 Evo2 limbs) I use Linkboy .600's, 32" long with 75 grain tips and they weigh 290 grains and that gives me 8.2 ggp.

My gap ranges from 6" low at 10 yards to 3" high at 25 yards (9" gap). If I put my Gobi's on the riser, it drops the gap by about 1.5" (7.5"). After 25 yards, it drops like a rock. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks everyone, all good, fair points!

I'm not that new to the sport as new to instinctive shooting. Mostly olimpic/compound target shooting without bothering about the ballistic much. Start shooting instinctive recently. So far I've been shooting with good results up to 20 yards but not further due to indoor limits. I was happy with the results and couldn't wait to have a crack at longer distances. But shooting outdoor, at longer distances been a surprise for me. The arrows flight looked really flat up till 20yd and suddenly dropping after 20yd. At least that was my impression. You all say that is all normal but it looked to my like the arrow was opened a parachute after 20yd.

So, keeping things instinctive, how do you guys cope with this. Is it all about experience and practice at longer distances or just getting stronger limbs?

Would a heavier arrow be more intuitive? I mean, it will fly slower, yes; with a higher arch, yes but will not have a more intuitive, easier anticipated trajectory? Like the way a badmington shuttlecock flies vs a tennis ball (I'm exaggerating a bit here).

Thus, I'm not arguing about the physics laws here but maybe there is a better more intuitive setting here, bow-arrow-archer.

Experimenting in archery is a bit expensive, therefore the reason to throw at you guys my silly questions before hurting my credit cards.

Thaks all,
Cheers

May the form be with you all!
 

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From the sounds of it to me, your equipment is doing what it鈥檚 supposed to. Your shooting a lighter shaft and smaller fletching.. weight will play into trajectory but if I鈥檓 reading correctly it鈥檚 your aiming system or lack of it.
If instinctive is how you choose to shoot that鈥檚 fine but you are going to put in the time to practice at much longer distances so your brain picks up the distance and the arrow drop so it can compensate.
your gear isn鈥檛 holding your arrow back it鈥檚 your aiming system or lack of an aiming system holding you back.
not being a jerk, don鈥檛 know how else to put it.

I have similar equipment specs and it鈥檚 possible to shoot much much farther.

Chad
 

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I鈥檝e gone to a more instinctive shooting method and a fast arrow is definitely more helpful than a slower one for me. I鈥檝e found there鈥檚 a big difference in my accuracy between 8gpp and 10gpp at the longer distances.

When shooting gap, a heavy arrow doesn鈥檛 matter as much as long as you judge yardage decently.
 

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Hmm, something seems not right to me. That set up should produce a fast arrow with a 29" draw. I misdoubt that the elevation would drop 10" between 20 and 25 yards if that is what you are saying. I cannot conveniently test that with my methods. Can someone else?

I shoot similar set ups that easily reach to 70 yards with reasonable aiming references. I regard it as an ideal set up for most general sport archery, targets and indoor archery. Aiming instinctively I find 15, 20 and 25 yards to be easy; 30, 35 to 40 are harder as sighting gaps are at their largest. I cannot see those gaps but my subconscious mind can. At 45, 50, 55, and 60 I can see them easily and switch to gap aiming. Beyon that I have to find aiming references on my bow or bow hand. - lbg
 
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