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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been shooting a recurve for nearly a year. I started out with used aluminum arrows, then moved to Amazon carbon arrows. Now I want to get a decent pile of arrows. I have a 46#@28" Bob Lee takedown. I pull 30" draw. I use a 125grain field point and broadhead.

My local shop got in some Black Eagle Vintage. In 350, 400, 500 and 600 spine. What would get me close to a good shooting arrow. Charts recommend the 400 spine, but I am worried that they will be too stiff. Any suggestions?
 

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400 would be good but your going to have to play with your strike plate and brace height I would think.
im playing with some 400spine @ 31” 48# and are a tad stiff with 225gr up front.
also I think the vintage comes in 34” so you have room to trim down if needed.
500 would be very underspinned I would think

Chad
 

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Guess I would disagree with Chad. With just 125 up front I would vote for the 500's. Pull up Lancaster archery and order one of each and test them out>
 

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Were the aluminums and other carbons you had flying well for you through that bow?

If so what spine were they and how long were they and what point weight were you shooting?

I think that the 400 spine will be your best bet. If your are going to purchase a "pile" of arrows from the shop I bet that they will let you shoot some until you are tuned and know exactly what you need to purchase.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Were the aluminums and other carbons you had flying well for you through that bow?

If so what spine were they and how long were they and what point weight were you shooting?

I think that the 400 spine will be your best bet. If your are going to purchase a "pile" of arrows from the shop I bet that they will let you shoot some until you are tuned and know exactly what you need to purchase.
Not sure about the aluminum (gave them away as they were all cut too short) but the carbon are 400 spine Amazon specials, they fly nice and straight, but they are 32" vs 34" for the Black Eagles.
 

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I have been shooting a recurve for nearly a year. I started out with used aluminum arrows, then moved to Amazon carbon arrows. Now I want to get a decent pile of arrows. I have a 46#@28" Bob Lee takedown. I pull 30" draw. I use a 125grain field point and broadhead.

My local shop got in some Black Eagle Vintage. In 350, 400, 500 and 600 spine. What would get me close to a good shooting arrow. Charts recommend the 400 spine, but I am worried that they will be too stiff. Any suggestions?
I punched your bow info into the 3 Rivers spine calculator tool and found Gold Tip Hunters in 400 (similar to the Black Eagle Vintage) worked well at 32" length.

Having just been through the tuning process myself it's pretty fresh in my mind. I'd recommend you go with the 400s, then get a selection of tip weights (3 Rivers do a couple of test kits to help with this if you have trouble sourcing a variety) and experiment with bare shaft tuning as per the Fender Archery guide until you're happy.

Your 125 grain field point is quite light so if those shafts did show stiff you have room to move up in point weight, which won't hurt your FOC anyway.

Time to do some experimenting! :)

David
 

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Well, I wouldn't buy a pile to start out. Tune first. Then by the pile.

I think it's a bad idea to start out with a point weight and arrow length in mind. If you hit that with a pile, you should have bet the lottery instead. I hope you have glue on broadheads so you can change the weight without heating and reheating the insert.

Everyone shoots different, but .400 and 125 even full length sounds very stiff to me. With my setup and the way I shoot I could tune .600's with 125, and I'm shooting 50 at 29.

www.fenderarchery.com/blogs/archery-info/basic-tuning

Bowmania
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well I bought one box of the 400 grain arrows. They seem to shoot straight as my other arrows out of my Bob Lee. I put my 125grain tips on and was getting nice straight flight from 20 yards out. For $90/6 arrows the fletching is terrible. Bounced one off the side of my tennis ball and it hit my fence, ripping one fletch off. Probably going to install tradvanes eventually anyway.
 

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I shoot a one piece cut past centre 45# off the shelf three under 28 inch draw. Arrows are 400 spine 125 field tips with 40 grain inserts cut 30 inch with tips and knocks arrows are 31 inch. Mine fly great everyone on here suggested 500 or 600 spine i tried em but my trusty ole 400 spine powerflights shoot better than anything.
 

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I shoot a one piece cut past centre 45# off the shelf three under 28 inch draw. Arrows are 400 spine 125 field tips with 40 grain inserts cut 30 inch with tips and knocks arrows are 31 inch. Mine fly great everyone on here suggested 500 or 600 spine i tried em but my trusty ole 400 spine powerflights shoot better than anything.
For some reason allot of people on here have an underspine fetish. I wonder if they just have slow bows or they aren't drawing as far as they think they are? 🤔
 

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125 grain points tune well for middle weight bows with wooden or aluminum shafts. Carbon shafts are a very different matter. They are so much lighter that they need two or three times more weight up front to shoot at all sweetly and that weight requires much stiffer spine.

So do not start with a point weight in mind; start with a shaft length and spine appropriate for your draw length and bow weight, and tune with a selection of point and insert weights. I don't use carbons but am thinking 400 or even 300 spine left long for your draw length, with over 200 grains up front. Kindly let us know what you end up with. - lbg
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
125 grain points tune well for middle weight bows with wooden or aluminum shafts. Carbon shafts are a very different matter. They are so much lighter that they need two or three times more weight up front to shoot at all sweetly and that weight requires much stiffer spine.

So do not start with a point weight in mind; start with a shaft length and spine appropriate for your draw length and bow weight, and tune with a selection of point and insert weights. I don't use carbons but am thinking 400 or even 300 spine left long for your draw length, with over 200 grains up front. Kindly let us know what you end up with. - lbg
Well, it's been a while. The Black Eagle arrows in 400 spine are good. I have 125grain field points and 140grain inserts/weights on a 32" arrow. So 265grains, with 4" Trad Vanes. They fly great, even my bareshaft arrow. I also bought a dozen Beman ICS hunter arrows in 400 spine.
 

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Flying great is not an indication of being perfectly tuned. I can shoot a very stiff arrow that flies great, but being right handed that arrow will impact left of where I'm aiming.

Bowmania
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Flying great is not an indication of being perfectly tuned. I can shoot a very stiff arrow that flies great, but being right handed that arrow will impact left of where I'm aiming.

Bowmania
Yeah, I have them hitting where I want to hit, no side to side stuff going on.
 

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You shoot much nicer recurve bow than me. However, using a 45 pound limbed takedown recurve that I pull to 48 pounds I use a GT 500 spined, traditional carbon arrow, full length at 32 inches. This arrow weighs 8.6 GPI and with a 125 grain FP it weighs 460.20 grains, finished arrow weight.

With Magnus stinger two blades or Muzzy three blade broadheads it flies good. This arrow gives me 9.58 grains per pound of hunting weight. Which should be good for whitetails.
 
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