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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've recently decided that it's time to start building my own arrows. The components I've selected are as follows.

  • Zwickey Eskimo's (screw in) 160 grains
  • Saunders 150 grain field points (9/32")
  • East Bloodlines (300 spine)
  • Gateway 4" shield cut feathers

The nocks and inserts I will be using are the standard ones (not F.O.C) that came with the Bloodline shafts.

My plan is to use a three fletch helical pattern with my feathers to help stabilize the broadheads (yes I understand tuning will also help), and I chose the 150 grain field points because I wanted the trajectory of my target arrows to be as close as possible to that of my hunting arrows.

I selected the 300 spine Bloodlines based off Easton's chart, which after selecting my draw weight and adding the extra pounds to allow for the added weight of my field points/broadheads it looked like the 300's would give me the most flexibility as far as overall arrow length is considered.

My draw length is 28" and my bow draws in at approximately 50lbs. I shoot with an open grip, and as such would like to use an arrow a little on the long side, just to be sure that the broadheads are well clear of my finger tips.

Has anyone got any recommendations or input on any of the above? Just trying to figure out if I'm heading down the right track. Would I be better off using a parabolic feather to help offset some of the drag of the helical twist?

P.S. I have already built up 6 arrows (3 fletched and 3 bare shaft) and after doing the necessary calculations my field point F.O.C is at 16.5% and my broadhead F.O.C is at 18.73%, both of which are a bit over Easton's recommended 10-15%. However, I have red in a few places that an F.O.C over 15% can really help with penetration (obviously a razor sharp broadhead helps to.)
 

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I hope that I am wrong, but I cannot image a 50# recurve using a .300 spine. I found them to be a touch heavy for a 55# Covert Hunter I had. Even with 175 grain tips. The CH is know to take a heavy spine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I hope that I am wrong, but I cannot image a 50# recurve using a .300 spine. I found them to be a touch heavy for a 55# Covert Hunter I had. Even with 175 grain tips. The CH is know to take a heavy spine.
Okay, you might well be right. I plan on using a longer arrow though, atleast 30" minimum.

What length arrow were you using? The spine will also vary depending on manufacturer.
 

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Way off, you should be at 400 spine. The Easton charts have been wrong for finger shooters for years. 160 grain points are not "heavy". If you want to check, order a couple single shafts and bareshaft with field points before you commit to a dozen.
 

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.300s left at 30"-31" will spine at more like .400s range, so at 50# at 28" drw length you might be in the right ball park spine, but might need to tweak with more weight changes up front to get it right.
it's all conjecture until you get them in the air.
 
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You might want to get the 75gr brass H inserts if you want to use the 300 spine. I’m shooting with a similar draw weight and length and I’d need a 400 with the regular 18gr insert. Lots of variables so very hard to know what each person needs.

If you can, it might be cheaper in the long run to order 2 individual shafts of each spine from Lancaster. That’s what I typically do when I switch to a new brand.
 

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Hey Arby, I'm starting to put together arrows too now. I'm using
Axis 5mm 400 spine
125 grn field tips
130 grn 2 blade stealth outback's
4in shield cut gateways.

Haven't tried the broad heads yet but the 400spine axis uncut at 31.5in fly real nice with this set up. I might try taking an inch off yet.
Bow weight is spot on at 50#.
Cheers.
 

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If you are cut to center and left long, they MIGHT be ok. But all my 50 lb bows shoot 400 spine with 200 grain total up front. All of these bows are cut just shy of center. One 40 lb cut to center takes a stiffer spine that my other 40 lb'ers though. 350 spine maybe? I think 300 will be too stiff.
 

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I shoot 300 spine at 29" with a half inch ss half out for a total of 225 up front (570 gr total) with my 50# Morrison Max 6 limbs - I draw a touch over 28". I use 2" four fletch and the arrows fly beautiful. I think center shot (I'm a touch off center) and individual release make a huge difference. I wouldn't sweat what others use and just go with what flies best for you . . . o f course that may/will change. I can also tune a 350 or 260 to shoot great but one is a little light for hunting (but wicked fun to shoot) and the other is too heavy for desired point on. Took me a few batches of arrows to fully realize there is no one perfect arrow for your bow. A point weight test kit is a great investment for arrow tuning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Apologies for the late reply, and thanks for all the input.

So I finally managed to get a bit of shooting time in, and.... the results are a bit surprising.

I started at a very close range of 5 metres (just in case the bare shafts were ridiculously far off) and worked my way back to 25 metres in 5 metre increments. The bare shafts seem to group in the middle of the target without any problems, the fletched arrows however, are consistently high and left! So much so that at 25 metres they were off the target, although I was starting to feel a bit worn out by this point so the operator might be to blame? I'm going to get some more shots in tomorrow and see if my results vary, if so I might start doing some arrow trimming or weight adjustment as required.

It might be worth noting that I decided to "gap shoot" all arrows rather than use my usual instinctive style of shooting. I opted for this method so that I could judge where the tip of the arrow was in relation to the target and where it ended up after I made the shot, this way I would have a good indication if the bareshafts were running stiff or weak.

Does anyone think it's a good idea to try bareshafting broadheads? I'd imagine that this might not work, due to the broadheads acting like fletching on the front of the arrow, correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just realised that I made a typo, my Easton Bloodlines are 330's not 300's....
 

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Right or left handed? Don't bareshaft broadheads. Get your bareshaft and fletched grouping together with field points. If you are new to aiming, you may have an alignment issue that you were correcting for without knowing it when you are snap shooting.
 

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Bart Harmeling
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Might be good to give us a current description of your total setup. Arrows and bow.

No need to shoot beyond 15yds at this point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Right or left handed? Don't bareshaft broadheads. Get your bareshaft and fletched grouping together with field points. If you are new to aiming, you may have an alignment issue that you were correcting for without knowing it when you are snap shooting.
So why shouldn't I bareshaft broadheads?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Might be good to give us a current description of your total setup. Arrows and bow.

No need to shoot beyond 15yds at this point.
Nuthatch, my bow is a Hoyt Satori, 19" riser, medium 50lb limbs. The arrows and components are as stated in my first post, except the shafts are a 330 spine NOT 300 (I made a typo in my first post) and are currently left uncut at 31.5" from end to end of the shaft.

I shoot three under and don't use any string walking or fixed crawl.

Hope this helps?
 

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Bart Harmeling
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The dynamic spine requirements of your bow are about 59#. Your arrows have a dynamic spine of almost 74#. Ideally they should be within 2# of each other, so it is likely that your arrows are pretty stiff. Do you have any heavier points you could try? 200 gn would bring the dynamic spine of the arrow down to 61.5.

Do you shoot right hand or left?
 

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Nuthatch, my bow is a Hoyt Satori, 19" riser, medium 50lb limbs. The arrows and components are as stated in my first post, except the shafts are a 330 spine NOT 300 (I made a typo in my first post) and are currently left uncut at 31.5" from end to end of the shaft.

I shoot three under and don't use any string walking or fixed crawl.

Hope this helps?
Still too stiff. Your bareshafts should tell you this. If you can add another 100 grains up front it may be close.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The dynamic spine requirements of your bow are about 59#. Your arrows have a dynamic spine of almost 74#. Ideally they should be within 2# of each other, so it is likely that your arrows are pretty stiff. Do you have any heavier points you could try? 200 gn would bring the dynamic spine of the arrow down to 61.5.

Do you shoot right hand or left?
How do you work this out? This is totally new to me.

Right handed by the way.
 

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Bart Harmeling
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Several years ago an avid archer named Stu Miller put together a Dynamic Spine Calculator. His first creation and subsequent versions where Excel files. 3 Rivers Archery hosts a web version that works with your browser. Here is a link to it.
 
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