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Mammoth Hunter
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That's a lot of speculation based on little evidence so far as to the identity of the individual as far as I can see. Still should be a cool site to read about in the literature when the site report is released.
 

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Mammoth Hunter
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I think he shot three under and gapped?:shooting:
Interesting you mention this. I was going over some Scythian jewelry and statuary the other day from archaeological contexts, and they're clearly shown using a 3 finger release, though it's harder to tell if it is split finger or three under (likely split finger). I found this super interesting as most horse archery cultures are associated with thumb draws, but the earliest of them seem to have been using three fingers, even with quite short composite recurve bows.
 

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j-san = Jason
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I wonder why some cultures adopted a thumb draw and others developed a 3-finger draw? Might it have to do with the types of bows these cultures developed and some of them just worked better with a thumb draw?
 

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Mammoth Hunter
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I wonder why some cultures adopted a thumb draw and others developed a 3-finger draw? Might it have to do with the types of bows these cultures developed and some of them just worked better with a thumb draw?
That was sort of the dominant theory - shorter bows have so much string pinch that you need to use a thumb instead of three fingers. The Scythian example seems to counter this wisdom though, as their bows were short (48" in some examples) and yet they used three fingers.
 

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Premium Member
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I hope it is him and they uncover more good stuff like the my hero Otzi!:sbrug:
 

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I wonder why some cultures adopted a thumb draw and others developed a 3-finger draw? Might it have to do with the types of bows these cultures developed and some of them just worked better with a thumb draw?
Thumb draw and finger draw are related to the way, the arrow is placed at the bow.
The Hunnish, Hungarian or Turkish horse bows are shot with the arrow placed on the index finger and not on the knuckle of it. Thus, to let the archers paradox work, it is necessary to shoot with a thumb release. The reason why those bows are shot in this special way is, that the arrow can be pulled to of the back quiver, placed on the string and shot with one quick fluent movement.

At Hungarian horse archery tournaments the archer rides a galloping horse and has to fire 3 arrows at 3 targets at the same post when passing it. One arrow straight forward, one to the side ands third after having passed the pole backwards. During that run the archer rides completely freehand and shoots at the top of a gallop jump, when the movement of the horse is straightest. One run, three arrows forward, to the side and backwards. Those guys are awesome!

The mediterranean style is not that quick but a bit more precise in the aspect of repeatability.
 

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Modern Hungarian horse archery uses mediterranen draw style as well... but then with arrow on knuckle
 

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j-san = Jason
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That was sort of the dominant theory - shorter bows have so much string pinch that you need to use a thumb instead of three fingers. The Scythian example seems to counter this wisdom though, as their bows were short (48" in some examples) and yet they used three fingers.
Makes sense. I guess a tall English longbow makes for a very accommodating string angle.

Another thing I wondered was the technology involved in the composite bows used by the Asian and Mediterranean cultures. Did the Europeans ever develop the composite bow technology or did they not have to due to the kinds of wood readily available?
 
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