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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Bit of a long shot, but anyone here with one?

Kind of fascinated with the look of this strange thing, despite the low grip not being my cup of tea. Marketed as a 'hunting style' riser. The alloy shelf hump looks good (some overhang?), sight mounts for bow quiver etc.



CNC'd, but would prefer 7075 alu than 6061-T6. Owner is an Olympiad, seems to know his stuff. I have limbs from them which have become my favourite bar none (N3 Progress), but also an inexpensive entry-level cast mag alloy riser from them (ET-1) which looks good but is pretty so-so in hand.
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Those 'arms' above the limb pockets worry me the most.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wondering what those bolts are in the place of where LLA normally is. No mention of if it has LLA (their ET-1 does) in the descrip. Will write to them. Would not buy an ILF riser without LLA personally.
 

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Hoyt older models have bolts because they use shims for LLA. This one looks that might work on the same principle. In the end it might be just "decoration" since the cut out in the riser is too aligned with the cutout in the silver-ish piece.
PS The Hoyt original system

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To me, the skeletonized design makes it look rather spindly. It does weigh in at only 1.76 pounds, so if you're wanting light weight, it certainly checks that box. The design also appears to incorporate a fair amount of deflex which should help make it point nicely and pleasant to shoot. The limb alignment system does appear similar to the Hoyt dowel system introduced around 2000 that used shims to achieve alignment versus the infinitely adjustable grub screw systems more commonly used today. Both systems work, although the latter may be easier to use. The alloy shelf hump appears designed to incorporate the use of a plunger(?) to establish centershot but perhaps there's more to it than the pictures reveal?

If you decide to buy this riser, be sure to share your experience with us.
 

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Interesting looking riser to be sure. Those little bars around the pocket seem to be there to add strength, while leaving the pocket skeletonized. (Is that a word?) I have to agree about the low grip, not for me. I'd have to figure out a way to build that up to a medium grip, and probably make it fatter in the process. I do wonder, however, if the grip is that way because they designed it to be shot while being held like a compound, and a wrist sling. It does look like it has some version of lla, but hard to tell with those pictures. Looks can be deceiving. The hump for shooting off the shelf is a nice addition, although odds are I would stick a springy rest on it, set the hump off tonthe side and probably forget where I put it. Even though it's 6061 aluminum instead of 7075, it is heat treated, so that is a good thing. If you decide to try it, by all means, let us know what you think of it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just to follow up on this, Nika Archery got back and said that yes those side bolts are LLA. All said, after looking at other med to very high deflex risers I've settled on my next ILF riser to be the Mybo Pathfinder. While a little more expensive, it looks quite a bit sturdier and offers more finishes/surfaces.

I will probably put my Nika N3 limbs on it.
 

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Mybo are truly gorgeous risers, you'll be happy.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'll look forward to your review of the Pathfinder. I hope you like it. It's a great looking riser but the lack of grip options was the deal killer for me.
Everywhere I read, the grip is the primary point of contention with this riser. I'm sure they'd be on to a best-seller if they had grip options, and in wood, polymers. I can see though that they're all about asserting their design, because they believe in it, and I'm willing to give them the benefit of the doubt.

That said there's no way in high summer or winter I'm taking that grip out without tennis wrap or similar, despite using a glove on the bow hand.
 
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