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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started shooting last year to extend my hunting season. I selected a compound because "that's what everybody uses"; it seemed like the obvious choice. The compound was FUN and easy, too easy. It's like shooting a rifle, once it's setup you aim and shoot. So a few weeks ago I got a Samick Red Stag and am now outside every free moment shooting, it's so much different and more challenging, I am selling the compound. I am struggling with accuracy and since I'm shooting alone out there I thought I might ask you guys for any coaching tips you may have. Here is a video for you to criticize. Please feel free to pick apart my form and my gear. Thanks.

A few sets I shot today
 

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Your second sequence of shots looked like you might be getting onto your back muscles a little better, otherwise the only advice I'd give is to slow down at anchor to allow your bow arm to settle a little longer.
Feathers instead of vanes will probably help with your clearance issue and I'd also suggest a second nock serving under your arrow. Try a heavier point to weaken the spine and it'll most likely move those groups a little more right.

I'd say for shooting only a few weeks you've got a pretty solid grasp of the basics!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I haven't tied the lower nock point because I am not clear on exactly how to tune the vertical position. I would like to tie both upper and lower rather than use the bead.

What do you mean by getting on to my back muscles?
 

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Buy this DVD Bro. otherwise check out Rods clinic schedule. Go Bro!

 

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Sam makes an excellent suggestion, the entire Masters of the Barebow series of instructional DVDS are great and #3 will help a bunch. I'd also suggest YouTube tutorials by Jimmy Blackmon, he has some great ones and talks at length about ways of attaining good form and using the rhomboids(getting into your back) to draw the bow instead of using the shoulders.

In the second shot sequence instead of your string hand remaining at the cheek you'll see that it was sliding rearward along the cheek. You were maintaining a pull on the string at anchor and getting into your back muscles...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I watched Blackmon's indoor form video and I see what you mean Longrifle, it was the third shot in the second set. I can see that my elbow is low and I am a bit hunched for all my shots but that one looked more upright and I saw the elbow go higher during the draw. Thanks a ton, that is a solid point to work on. That's what I am looking for.
 

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S....L....O....W D...O...W....N !!

You didn't shoot your compound that quick, did you? :)

50# is a lot to start with but you seem to be handling it.... as long as it's not the reason you are shooting too quick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was a bit edgy filming, I didn't want to make it too long. Generally, I pause and stare at my focus point, many times I draw and then put it down because it doesn't feel right. I do agree I was going a a ridiculous pace, thanks for the tip, noted.
 

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You look like your having fun, keep doing what your doing. I agree with the others about slowing down. I get nervous when I film myself, so I understand. You do tend to have a "dead" release which is one way to shoot. Are you letting the string go, or are you focused on the target and it kinda just goes? It's important to not think about letting go, or trying to open your fingers. Make sure your tab hand stays close to your face or your left/rights will be off. Looks like you have a strong bow arm, that's a big plus. I like how you keep the bow raised till the arrow hits the target. I think your rest is out to far, try some thinner 2 sided tape if you can. A lot will change over the next few weeks, just keep having fun and you will sort out what works for you.
 

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many times I draw and then put it down because it doesn't feel right.
One of the smartest things you can do and we should all practice that. When you force the shot anyway the results are almost never as good as they would have been had we stopped, let down and regrouped, and started again with confidence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good tip, I didn't stop and lower during the video but I do this quite often. I try to make all my shots "The" shot when I'm shooting, I don't want to subconciously remember the bad ones.
 

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Jumping from compound to a wooden bow of hunting weight will be very tough. My suggestion is to get a cheap olympic metal riser + basic limbs of 30 -35# and start training from there. This rig will be much much easier to shoot accurately compared to the one you have. Once you build up the form and confidence you can go to the 50# bow.
 

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Certainly not new shooter stuff. 50# is a lot and can take the fun out of a 200 arrow session for some of us.

Strength and ex-compound lets you draw while raising the bow to target level. For others of us, there's a pre-draw with little resistance, then raise to target level and almost stop. Only then take the full poundage and at level use the back and less shoulder. I've had shoulder surgery so need to draw that way and cannot do the dual lift/draw you do.

Buy hey we all find a style and having fun is much more important. On that score, dumping the sniper-rifle compound sounds like a great move!




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Here's a link to Arne Moe's videos which are also very good...http://www.youtube.com/user/TheMoebow1

While it's possible to shoot vanes with a recurve, especially with an elevated rest, until your form is solid enough to let you really tune your bow feathers will be much more forgiving. Lots of shooters who have the skills to tune and shoot vanes stick with feathers, they are just easier to deal with for most people.

I agree with the second nock point under your arrow. You can make the kind that twist on the string, Rick Barbee posted a nice video on this site a few weeks ago.

When you feel your form is getting consistent give tuning a try, it will help you get the most out of your bow. The first link is general setup and the second link is bareshaft tuning, one of the more popular ways to get things right.

http://www.acsbows.com/bowtuning.html

http://www.acsbows.com/bareshaftplaning.html
 

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You're definately getting it. Get a sling for your bow hand. it helps keep the bowhand relaxed. Figure out a shot sequence that works for you and play it in your head every time you shoot. Helps with consistency and "nerves".
Most importantly, relax and enjoy yourself and the shot.:)
 

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Probably the most important thing you can do is get rid of the vanes. The problem they create is those misses to the left. THe plastic doesn't give when it hits the shelf. Arrow bounces to the left.

Next I back tension. You don't initiate the release with your fingers. "Use back tension to pull your fingers off the string." Rod Jenkins A Formaster is the easiest way to learn over the net.

RJ also says 45 second between shots. This isn't a lot of time!!! What your doing is "mindless" shooting. How can you think of what you did wrong on the last shot and correct on the next in the time you took between shots?

I have something that would help. PM me and I'll send it to you.

Bowmania
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So far I have refletched half a dozen shafts with 4" parabolic feathers and it seems to have given a fair bit more consistency to my groups. I also adjusted my nock point per Longrifle346's instructions. I am focusing most now on using my back like Blackmon's video describes.
 

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If at all possible get expert coaching.

A couple hours with a coach will buy you dividends that will last you forever.

I was fortunate enough to get (free) coaching from both an olypic quality archer and from Mr James Foster, who was Texas bare bow champion in the early '90's.

Learned more in a couple hours than I would have learned on my own, in years.

Also, like golf, you don't get into learning bad habits.
 

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Looks like the arrows are cut down a bit from full. That will make them stiffer than 3555s usually are. Try going to 125 grain points, that might fix both the high and the left.
 
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