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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would appreciate advice on choosing arrows for recreational target shooting. I have read the Easton and Three Rivers arrow selection information and threads on the subject and am pretty confused. Please help!

I'll be using takedown recurve bows, a 19 lb. Bear Formula Bronze at first and then a Quinn Comet (35 lb.). I'd like to use aluminum arrows, preferably already complete and fletched with vanes. My draw length is about 28 inches and I think I'll need 29 or 30 inch arrows.

The Easton guide led me to size 1514/1516 or 1913/1914 arrows, but complete arrows seem to come mostly in other sizes. The Easton Genesis seems like a good choice, but it's only in 1820. Would that size be an okay choice with my bows? Any other arrows and sizes you would recommend? Will I need different arrows for the 19# and 35# bows?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Just spotted the typo in the title right after I posted it. It should say 19 lb, not 20 lb.
 

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Scott, welcome to Trad Talk.
To actually tune arrows to the two bows you mention, I believe you will need two different sets of arrows. However, depending on where you’re at on the learning curve, you might consider getting arrows that are correct for your 35 pound bow, and shooting them in your 19 or 20 pound bow even if they are not tuned properly for the lighter draw weight. If the main purpose for shooting the 20 pound bow is to develop proper form, you don’t really need tuned arrows for that, and it may be a while before you can really tell the difference anyway. Using this approach, as you gain skills and are ready to move up to the 35 pound bow, you will have arrows on hand that can easily be tuned, and you’ll have the repeatable shooting form needed to do that.
For the 35 pound bow, I think you’re looking at 1916 shafts if you go with aluminum arrows. Lancaster sells Easton Tribute arrows fletched with either feather or vanes at a reasonable price.
To buy aluminum arrows that are properly spined for a 20 pound bow can be difficult when your draw length is 28”. Most arrow shafts that I have seen with weaker spine ratings tend to be too short for adults. But I look forward to feedback from others on this, because it’s been a long time since I shot aluminum arrows.
I recently set up a 20 pound bow myself, to use when focusing entirely on form exercises. I ended up buying Black Eagle Intrepid shafts, which are carbon shafts that have a 32” factory length. I bought a few each rated at 900 and 1150 to see what tunes the best. I’m guessing the 1150’s will be closer to the mark, but it will be a few weeks before I know what works for me.
If you end up going with carbon shafts for the 35# bow, I think 700 spine arrows will be a good starting point. You might check out Gold Tip Warriors. Big Jim’s Dark Timber arrows are a good value also, but he’s been out of stock for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you! That's exactly the kind of information I need. I like that the Tribute is more of an entry-level arrow, as I'm just starting out.

Can you describe a bit how you chose 1916 shafts for the 35 pound bow? I'm trying to understand arrow selection better.

When I went through the Easton charts I ended up with only two options for my 35 pound bow, 1913 or 1914, but those are only available in Platinum Plus or Eclipse which seem like overkill for a beginner like me. Is it that 1916 is close enough to 1913 or 1914 and is available in an entry level model? I hope you don't mind all my questions!
 

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Probably, It is a bit of a guess because of form issues and most people shooting light bows arent drawing that far. If you bow has a plunger, the spine won't be as critical and you can get away with shooting an arrow that is a little bit on the stiff side.
 

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CM thanks for Easton link, I will be saving that for future use.
I’m happy to defer to the experience of others, but it looks like the stick bow guide accessed via the link provided assumes 28 inch arrows.
With a 30 inch arrow 1916 shafts can look more likely, according to the 3 Rivers calculator, fwtw.
Scott, this gives you a taste of how it goes when selecting arrows. The charts will get you in the right ballpark, and its good to understand the assumptions behind each chart or calculator.
Starting out, it’s easy to obsess on fine-tuning when all you really need to be is in the right ballpark.
Once you get to the point where your arrows are grouping at 20 yards or so, with good shooting form, I think it’s a good time to start experimenting with arrow tuning. But that’s probably a topic for a different thread :).
 

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I suggest 1816 Tribute shafts. I have them left full length and made up by Lancaster Archery with 3" feather fletching and NIBB or bullet target points. I somewhat prefer NIBBS as they have a long shaft that fits inside of and strengthens the front of the arrow. They would be ideal for the 35# and might work OK from the lighter bow. Some of my pupils have been able to use them with light bows. The alloy used in Tributes is the good one and I have found them to be just as accurate as the more costly Platinum and Jazz versions.

I also use 1916s in 35# bows but they require heavier screw-in points to tune for that weight.1914s would also work but as you have found would be more costly than the Tributes. Kindly let us know how they work in the lighter bow. If not good, I would find some light spined carbon shafts long enough for you. - lbg
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks, Fozziebear. Doing this progressively makes sense. For now, all I need are arrows I can use to learn the basics, using the 19-pound bow. The same goes for the bow, for that matter. I'm starting with the 19-pound bow only because I think it's probably easier to learn good form if I don't need much force to pull the bowstring. The only reason I'm planning on advancing to the 35-pound bow later on is that it's a Quinn Comet and I've heard it's a joy to shoot.

It looks as though the only issue may be getting 30 inch aluminum arrows that are suitable for the 19-pound bow. Perhaps 29 inches would be long enough? Tribute 1616 are available at 29 inches. The longest arrow I have is a fiberglass one that is 28.75 inches from tip to bottom of the nock curve, and at my full draw the tip was an inch (or a bit less) over the end of the bow.

If I do need 30-inch arrows I'll see if the 1816s I'm getting for the 35-pound bow will also work with the lighter bow. If not, then it's carbon fiber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks, longbowguy! I'll do exactly that. 30-inch Tribute 1816s for the 35-pound bow, and I'll see how I do with them on the 19-pound bow. I'm glad to learn I'll be able to get them made up complete.

If I have difficulty with the 1816s on the 19-pound bow, perhaps I'll try 1616s at 29 inches. Otherwise, carbon fiber. I'll just have to be extra careful not to break a CF arrow -- CF splinters look nasty!
 

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I suggest 1816 Tribute shafts. I have them left full length and made up by Lancaster Archery with 3" feather fletching and NIBB or bullet target points. I somewhat prefer NIBBS as they have a long shaft that fits inside of and strengthens the front of the arrow. They would be ideal for the 35# and might work OK from the lighter bow. Some of my pupils have been able to use them with light bows. The alloy used in Tributes is the good one and I have found them to be just as accurate as the more costly Platinum and Jazz versions.

I also use 1916s in 35# bows but they require heavier screw-in points to tune for that weight.1914s would also work but as you have found would be more costly than the Tributes. Kindly let us know how they work in the lighter bow. If not good, I would find some light spined carbon shafts long enough for you. - lbg
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Thanks, longbowguy! I'll do exactly that. 30-inch Tribute 1816s for the 35-pound bow, and I'll see how I do with them on the 19-pound bow. I'm glad to learn I'll be able to get them made up complete.


For most purposes I prefer aluminum shafts, or wooden ones! But for very light bows I suggest carbon ones because their light weights work better. The low power makes the horrid splinters issue highly unlikely. Those mostly occur with powerful compound bows. But if you make a foul hit on something hard flex check them for safety. - lbg
 
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