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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been back active on this forum for a month or three. I've picked up good information from you guys. Heck, I've even given out a bit of advice, based on my experiences, and what I understood of the good information I had picked up. Tested out a set of limbs that should have been perfect, but wound up to heavy because of my long layoff from archery. Bought two new risers, 25" and a 19", with the goals of starting into barebow, and trying out a shortish riser. Bought a new light set of limbs, and a bunch of accessories.

Ive seen TP brought up around here, but not this particular issue. I have an hour or more, every weekday, as well as hours on the weekends, to go to the range. I know I enjoy the sport of archery. Yet, every time I start thinking of going to the range, i face anxiety, and start finding excuses and reasons not to go. So, i haven't made it yet. Can't shoot in my backyard, since it's illegal to shoot anywhere except at a range that's a business or a park that has an archery range (there are none of those).

How do I get past this? Is it just a matter of once I force myself to go the first time, everything will fall into place? Is this something I'll have to fight every time?

Any advice is greatly appreciated.
 

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Everything you have done in life was at one point “hard or impossible”, got to just drive in, after awhile you will look back and wonder why your held back.

Be realistic, shooting in front of other people naturally brings a little stress. Start close (10yards) and just stay at that range until you feel more confident. You will find that the archery community in general is made up of a bunch of guys and gals that like to help each other, of course there are outliers but who cares what they think.

Your not going to the range to gain other people’s approval, your doing it because it your interest. If someone pokes and prods you due to lack of experience or skill, they can either help you progress or go fly a kite. Those kinds of folks are the same ones who make fun of heavy set folks going to the gym trying to better their selves, no one respects them..
 

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Ranges have very different cultures from place to place, different rules and protocols. Best to visit one and get a sense of the vibe. The ones I will now always avoid are the hangouts, where people sit around and talk shop loudly, and also those dominated by Olympic or wheel bow archers where you get the scowls and can't get an elbow in on a target.

Just give it a go. You will feel stronger by doing so. Have to try before you buy anyway. But a good range, with good rules, people and culture is priceless.

(and BTW thanks for your advice on this forum - some great posts!)
 

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I’ve definitely been there. With my first few bouts of TP my shooting got so bad it was embarrassing. Arrows were hitting under the bale because I would freeze under the spot or to the right of the bale because of massive jerking of the bow. I would hole up in my garage to blind bale or go to the range when it would be empty to work through things, but it would come right back when I went to shoots again or shot indoors with others. I wish there were the resources back then that there are now cause my approach to TP sucked. My advise is to go put yourself out there because that’s the only way it’s going to get better. The more you go the more comfortable you will be, but don’t be surprised if there’s a two-steps-forward-one-step-back kind of thing. Eventually (hopefully) it’ll take fewer and fewer arrows to settle down each outing.

FWIW, the mental management book, With Winning in Mind, helped me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here's where the odd part of it is. I've been to the local range before. There's only one here. I used to go and shoot every single weekend. The only time I found it any where near stressful going there, was the one time I showed up to shoot, and the state shoot was going to start. So, it went from it being me on the 10 yard range, over on the side, to me having to move back to 20, and not having any more than 2 feet of space on either side of me. Once that happened, it took about 10 minutes before I packed up and cut things short, just too crowded. I went back several more times after that, before the tear in my tendon on my right elbow started my long layoff.

This afternoon, as I was in the middle of putting in a new light in one of my parents bathrooms, I had a thought, and wonder if by chance this could be the issue that's causing the apprehension. This, I have to admit, is embarrassing. The day after it happened, I reached out to a couple of old military buddies, both of which admitted that it had happened to them as well. Here at home I had an accident, back in August. Could have been very bad, but thankfully, no one was hurt. As such, I there are a few stipulations I have to adhere to, including not having the tools available to effectively protect my house, for a several more months. That's about as far as I'm willing to speak to the issue on a public forum, however, if someone feels they need further details, they are welcome to pm me. I do know that when these stipulations are over, I have an awful lot of work to do, mentally, to get past it. I'm doing what I can until it's over, but when it's over, that's when the real work begins for regaining accuracy with that set of tools. I can say that my confidence with those tools was severely shaken by the accident.

As far as my input on threads, I do hope my posts are helpful. I strive to be "contributing member of society" on the forums I belong to.
 

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This is not to start a conflict or anything else, just my .02, and that's it. I at one time had to take a hiatus from archery to deal with a situation. When we found out my first wife had cancer, it hit us like a ton of bricks. I had always been able to "fix" things. hell, I grew up on a large cattle ranch and we farmed so we could fix just about anything. During her 8 year battle I had to come to the realization that we don't always have the "tools" to fix things. i had some difficulties getting back into archery, and, there were other factors as well, however, I took the advice of a friend and sought counseling. It didn't take long to realize that there are alot of things we can't control, that peoples "perceptions are there realities" and we don't always understand everything. You have to find the right person, but it helped me a lot. Maybe not great advice, but it did help me. I may be overreaching but after 64 years, 4 adopted kids, the situation with my wife, I feel I have a bit of experience. reach out if you want. Life is too short to be alone or miserable and not find peace. The people on here are great and there is so much willingness to help.
 

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Can you at least do holding drills at home?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This is not to start a conflict or anything else, just my .02, and that's it. I at one time had to take a hiatus from archery to deal with a situation. When we found out my first wife had cancer, it hit us like a ton of bricks. I had always been able to "fix" things. hell, I grew up on a large cattle ranch and we farmed so we could fix just about anything. During her 8 year battle I had to come to the realization that we don't always have the "tools" to fix things. i had some difficulties getting back into archery, and, there were other factors as well, however, I took the advice of a friend and sought counseling. It didn't take long to realize that there are alot of things we can't control, that peoples "perceptions are there realities" and we don't always understand everything. You have to find the right person, but it helped me a lot. Maybe not great advice, but it did help me. I may be overreaching but after 64 years, 4 adopted kids, the situation with my wife, I feel I have a bit of experience. reach out if you want. Life is too short to be alone or miserable and not find peace. The people on here are great and there is so much willingness to help.
I was seeing someone, as stress just kept adding up. Only managed 4 appointments. Stresses of my wife's physical and mental issues, my parent's health, with mom bouncing in and out of the hospital and dad having Parkinson's and Post Polio. My own physical issues, with feeling like not being able to address them. I'll be talking to the patient advocate with my next appointment in July.

@Grantmac yes I can
 
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Holding drills really help certain anxieties for shooting.

As for the rest, I really empathize with that. I've had a terminally ill partner for several years and it just adds up to a lot of stress that you can't escape.
 
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Since you are a veteran there are various resources available. Some you know, there may be others. Find them.

Find a way to do form practice at home. In a garage or basement if you have them. I do not but I have a short hall toward the linen closet (no errant arrow can get past that). The Olympions do a lot of form practice at about 6 feet. So do I.

Further, get some judo points and go roving in some forest or creek bottom. Shoot at stumps, weeds, gopher holes, dead leaves. Enjoy nature. - lbg
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Holding drills really help certain anxieties for shooting.

As for the rest, I really empathize with that. I've had a terminally ill partner for several years and it just adds up to a lot of stress that you can't escape.
Thanks. I'll start trying some draw and holding drills. Add them to my fitness schedule.

Since you are a veteran there are various resources available. Some you know, there may be others. Find them.

Find a way to do form practice at home. In a garage or basement if you have them. I do not but I have a short hall toward the linen closet (no errant arrow can get past that). The Olympions do a lot of form practice at about 6 feet. So do I.

Further, get some judo points and go roving in some forest or creek bottom. Shoot at stumps, weeds, gopher holes, dead leaves. Enjoy nature. - lbg
I was talking with someone, it was supposedly just the preliminary appointments, and then forwarded to a more permanent person. Talking at the first appointment she said that she would do the paperwork to get me into the regular program. 3 months/ 4 appointments later she still hadn't done it. So patient advocate it is.

I had read on here at some point, that some people were filling in the worn out spots in their 3D targets with that spray foam insulation. So, I took a box and filled one with it. Will have to see if I have a spot in the house I can set that up. Didn't think about that. Thanks.

I'll see what I can figure out for roaming and stumping. That may be something that had to wait a bit. Will try to figure that out, too.
 

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If you can't find a bit of forest but have access to a bit of gassy hill, my favourite practice aside stumping is taking 3 tennis balls and 2 or 3 arrows for each to a safe and unpopulated slope somewhere, for an hour or two. Judo points work well to stop you losing them, or field points with a washer.

Throw the balls at different distances down or up a grassy slope and give yourself two or three shots on each. If you hit one it'll move, so shoot it again. Once you've shot at all balls, walk over, pick them up one at a time, throw each and start again. Start off from 5-20m throws until you're hitting each of those 3 balls, then throw them further, eventually one of them as far as you can. Practice kneeling shots and shooting with awkward foot placement.

Does wonders for the shooting in my experience, and is well worth the effort.
 

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Work, I have found the best drills. Make or buy you a shot trainer. Hook that to you heaviest bow. Draw the bow with only the trainer. No draw fingers or arrow on the string, just draw with your elbow and back. Get inside/ alignment as best you can. I Use rotational draw like Moe instructions. Do in doors as draw and hold. This bow is 10 pounds heavier. Then outside against a wall it blind bale. Draw aim, close your eye and just feel the shot. That gets me into drawing and hold drills. Approach each shot as you are not going to take the shot. Now if you feel the same as the blind shot. The shot should just happen. Please note this is the time I am now able to focus on the aiming. Don't fall back into taking the shot when your point is on the shot.
Dan
 

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I found your post confusing but it sounds like you have issues beyond archery and the range and the people there. And its out of my depth to comment on that.

But as to bows - if I had to go to a range to shoot - I probably would find a different hobby. Its just my personality. I like going out in my yard and shooting or into the woods and stumping by myself or with a friend or 2. Its probably that Im somewhat introverted by nature.
I deal with people everyday at work and etc, but it it takes a lot of my focus and I enjoy archery better with out that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
@DDD I'll look into getting a shot trainer. Might be a good option, and we'll worth a try. I did find out a few weeks ago, that I'm overbowed with 35# @28, which is frustrating, but after a long layoff from archery that includes 2 elbow surgeries and a bout of covid, I suppose I was fooling myself, thinking I still had the same strength and stamina I had when I stopped shooting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I found your post confusing but it sounds like you have issues beyond archery and the range and the people there. And its out of my depth to comment on that.

But as to bows - if I had to go to a range to shoot - I probably would find a different hobby. Its just my personality. I like going out in my yard and shooting or into the woods and stumping by myself or with a friend or 2. Its probably that Im somewhat introverted by nature.
I deal with people everyday at work and etc, but it it takes a lot of my focus and I enjoy archery better with out that.
I am also an introvert. I deal with people all day, both in the office, and handling inbound calls. I have to step outside of myself, so to speak, to be able to do my job. In other words, I have to use the non dominant parts of my personality, such as being outgoing, friendly, etc.

Yes, having to go to a range to shoot is not exactly fun. I'd much rather I could shoot in the backyard, but it's not legal to do so here. Odds are, most of my neighbors wouldn't say a wording indid shoot back there. That accident I alluded to earlier did land me in some hot water with the local authorities, temporarily, so I'd rather not take the chance of making things worse. Things will get back to normal for that, early next year.

I have an indoor range about a 20 minute drive from me. That's also, as it happens, about the same amount of time I drive to work. Come to find out, there's also an outdoor range about the same distance to the southwest. It's not being shooting at the range, itself, or the people there since last time the only time someone talkes to me whilenthere was to ask if their kid could try out my recurce, that is the problem. I suspect that the problem I'm running into is that subconsciously, I'm worried that I'll have a similar accident (but with an arrow this time) while at the range, and so I'm making excuses not to go. This is what I'm dealing with and trying to get around. I'm working to convince myself that what happened was a once in a lifetime thing, and won't happen again.
 

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Hey, how are you today? I'm thinking we have a homemade shot trainer here but do lend it out so not positive. They are pretty easy to make anyway. A shooting band is a great tool as well.

Learning your shot at the bale is the best training you can do and makes it easy to find a place at home to do it. You just need a few pointers to get started and then all the you tube coaches mentioned can help you fill in the gaps.

You can not work on your shot by shooting at targets, that is Len Cardinales quote not mine. It's why Rod Jenkins says not to be shooting at targets for three weeks in his course.

When you are ready there is a "bridge" program that eases you into shooting at distances and working on whatever aiming or not aiming system you choose.
 

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Learning your shot at the bale is the best training you can do and makes it easy to find a place at home to do it. You just need a few pointers to get started and then all the you tube coaches mentioned can help you fill in the gaps.

You can not work on your shot by shooting at targets, that is Len Cardinales quote not mine. It's why Rod Jenkins says not to be shooting at targets for three weeks in his course.
100% to this. If it's about coming back to archery & working on your shot, targets are the last thing you need in your sight picture.
 
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