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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you make a precisely 62 3/8" flemish string? Every time comes out longer or shorter, too much to adjust it by adding/extracting turns. I keep undoing it until I get the right lenght, last time it was 4 times.
So, how can one calculate the lenght of the strands to obtain the right lenght of the finished string, from start.
I need to make a 62 3/8" (62.4", 1585mm) with all the twists and the stretching including. 14 strands, spectra 652 material.
Is there any chance?

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· Bart Harmeling
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Here's a screen shot of the specs I record for each string. Any of the variables can change the strings final length. I usually adjust the bundle length, twists in loops, or the loop length to change the final length. You can adjust the bundle length with out moving the jig's peg by skipping a nail and angle down to the next nail when winding strands around the jig. I'll include a photo to help explain. See the arrows that would result in a slightly shorter string.

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Drive two nails in a 2x to length and twist the loop on the bottom and blend in tight. Twist the top loop in and before you blend in the tail, wrap the loop around the other nail. Pull the loop down 1/4 inch and blend in the tail tight.
Twist the string up and set the brace.
By time everything seats in, you will be close.
 

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Just build longer or shorter sting and add or subract some twist.
To many twists make a creepy string. Once you have your string recipe for loop size vs length it is easy to get what you want.

I like less twists. My jig does even inches so i know what to do if i have a 62.5” string to make with a given material.

Flemishes are twisted so as long as string is not over twisted im not sure what your asking (exactly)? Some great advice above.

once you take a string apart a few times and redo and shorten last loop bundle string material will get fluffy and it gets hard to deal with and you can never get all the smal twist out of fiber.

HH~
 

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I was just about to give up on Flemish Twist strings and then I had an epiphany. Instead of trying to calculate the correct length ahead of time I measure as I go and "drop strands" to ensure that I hit the length I want/need for the string I'm building.

Dropping strands is a technique I use in whipmaking to control the taper in the whip. Yes, more material is wasted. However, the upside is more control over the finished product.

(Edit): just saw that in another thread hey Mister does something similar by braiding the loops on his bowstring. He's got great pics too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was just about to give up on Flemish Twist strings and then I had an epiphany. Instead of trying to calculate the correct length ahead of time I measure as I go and "drop strands" to ensure that I hit the length I want/need for the string I'm building.

Dropping strands is a technique I use in whipmaking to control the taper in the whip. Yes, more material is wasted. However, the upside is more control over the finished product.

(Edit): just saw that in another thread hey Mister does something similar by braiding the loops on his bowstring. He's got great pics too.
It wouldn't help because the "dropping" would happen after you make the loop, I mean you already decided on the length of the string by then.
 

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Gabriel,

I'm not speaking theoretically. This is how I make my strings and the reason I can achieve the string length I want. I understand that this may be difficult to understand because it's different from the normal method and I'm probably not describing what I see and do effectively. I will try to explain further.

All the strands (2 bundles) are cut to the same length. I don't try to calculate how long each strand should be. Some people stagger the length of their strands to build in taper. I'm not saying that this is wrong, merely that I'm terrible at using that approach. I suspect that many who struggle with making a Flemish string are likely running into a similar issue.

Once the top loop is complete I measure the total length from the loop to the end of my twist. Then I mark the corresponding point on the other end of the string and start my twist for the bottom loop. Likewise for the length of the string. This is closer to the plaitting/braiding method I'm already familiar with, so I decided to stay with it. I don't rely on the jig to calculate string length. I measure, begin and end the twist where I want it, and drop strands where I want them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Gabriel,

I'm not speaking theoretically. This is how I make my strings and the reason I can achieve the string length I want. I understand that this may be difficult to understand because it's different from the normal method and I'm probably not describing what I see and do effectively. I will try to explain further.

All the strands (2 bundles) are cut to the same length. I don't try to calculate how long each strand should be. Some people stagger the length of their strands to build in taper. I'm not saying that this is wrong, merely that I'm terrible at using that approach. I suspect that many who struggle with making a Flemish string are likely running into a similar issue.

Once the top loop is complete I measure the total length from the loop to the end of my twist. Then I mark the corresponding point on the other end of the string and start my twist for the bottom loop. Likewise for the length of the string. This is closer to the plaitting/braiding method I'm already familiar with, so I decided to stay with it. I don't rely on the jig to calculate string length. I measure, begin and end the twist where I want it, and drop strands where I want them.
Thanks for the clarification. Now let me try mine. What I'm interested from all your processes is the part where you decide your marking that will get the desired string lenght, after you make the first loop, measure, mark and start working on the second loop: "Once the top loop is complete I measure the total length from the loop to the end of my twist. Then I mark the corresponding point on the other end of the string and start my twist for the bottom loop. Likewise for the length of the string."
So I'm assuming you have a specific lenght in mind for the string when you start, thus what's your calculation method here?
 
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